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Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop

From: Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together

Video: Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop

In the last chapter we focused on starting with raw files, adjusting them in Lightroom, and moving them to Photoshop for further editing. In this chapter we'll look at starting that workflow with pixel-based images, rather than raw files. This movie is an overview of the subject, in the rest of the movies in this chapter, we'll dive into the details of the three workflows I'll introduce here for editing pixel-based images in Lightroom and Photoshop together. What do I mean by pixel-based images? Lightroom supports three pixel-based formats: PSD, which stands for Photoshop Document, Photoshop's proprietary format, TIFF, and JPEG.

Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop

In the last chapter we focused on starting with raw files, adjusting them in Lightroom, and moving them to Photoshop for further editing. In this chapter we'll look at starting that workflow with pixel-based images, rather than raw files. This movie is an overview of the subject, in the rest of the movies in this chapter, we'll dive into the details of the three workflows I'll introduce here for editing pixel-based images in Lightroom and Photoshop together. What do I mean by pixel-based images? Lightroom supports three pixel-based formats: PSD, which stands for Photoshop Document, Photoshop's proprietary format, TIFF, and JPEG.

I'll use PSDs as examples in these movies. When I start with a pixel-based image, like this PSD, the adjustments that I apply to it in Lightroom are nondestructive, as we saw that they are for a raw file. In fact, all Lightroom adjustments are just nondestructive instructions, they don't change actual pixels. So if I go to the basic panel and I drag some of these sliders, I'm not changing the actual pixels in this PSD.

As with a raw file it makes sense to use Lightroom's intuitive controls to optimize the appearance of this image and then take it over to Photoshop for just those edits that I can best accomplish there, and that's done with the same command that you saw me use on raw files. Under the Photo menu, choosing Edit In, and Edit in Adobe Photoshop. The first difference you'll see when you start with a pixel-based file like this one as opposed to a raw file, is that it doesn't just open into Photoshop at this point. Instead, you are faced with this window, giving you a choice of three paths, and I think that on the surface of this dialogue box, it's not exactly clear what you are going to get when you choose a particular path, although Adobe has made an attempt to answer that by the little taglines under each of the choices, but there's a lot more to it as we'll see in the following movies.

But just to give you a peek at what's to come and a sense of what each of these will give you, if you choose Edit a Copy with Lightroom Adjustments, you will get not only your original file, but also a copy of that file in your Lightroom catalog. So this is good choice if you want a copy in your catalog that displays both your Lightroom Adjustments and your Photoshop Adjustments. Now the Lightroom Adjustments will be embedded into the copy so that you won't be able to change them, but you'll still have the original file in your catalog with your Lightroom adjustments applied in Lightroom's typical nondestructive, re-editable way.

If you were to choose Edit a Copy instead, you would end up with two files in your catalog, again: the original with, your nondestructive Lightroom Adjustments, and a copy made from that original that ignores your Lightroom Adjustments. This copy will display any Photoshop Adjustments you may have added. So this is a good choice if, after you've made Lightroom Adjustments to an image, you decide you want an unadjusted copy of the original, perhaps for experimenting with other looks. And then there is Edit Original. This option will give you just one file in your Lightroom catalog, the original file, and it will have both your non destructive Lightroom adjustments and your Photoshop Adjustments.

This option is like editing the image independently in Lightroom and Photoshop. One thing about this option is that after you make Lightroom Adjustments and open it in to Photoshop, when the images open in Photoshop for editing, it won't display those Lightroom adjustments, so don't be surprised by that. You can use this option to access and reedit any Photoshop layers that you've added using any of the three workflows. So let's say that you adjust photo quality in Lightroom first as I just did, and then you use one of these other options, say, Edit a Copy with Lightroom Adjustments to add type layers in Photoshop. And then you save in Photoshop and you come back to Lightroom.

Well, let's say you then decide you want to change font of the Photoshop type layers. That's when you use Edit Original to reopen the file into Photoshop and all the layers will be intact there and ready for editing, and then you can save back into Lightroom again. And we'll see that workflow too. So that's an introduction to editing a pixel-based photo using Lightroom and Photoshop together. Let's dive in and get to the details.

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This video is part of

Image for Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together
Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together

32 video lessons · 13274 viewers

Jan Kabili
Author

 
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  1. 10m 38s
    1. Welcome
      36s
    2. Using the exercise files
      4m 4s
    3. Why use Lightroom and Photoshop together?
      5m 58s
  2. 16m 37s
    1. Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop
      6m 20s
    2. Setting file naming preferences in Lightroom
      4m 27s
    3. Maximizing PSD compatibility in Photoshop
      4m 40s
    4. Matching color settings
      1m 10s
  3. 24m 25s
    1. Passing raw files from Lightroom to Photoshop
      8m 17s
    2. Handling mismatches with Open Anyway
      6m 21s
    3. Handling mismatches with Render using Lightroom
      4m 43s
    4. Updating your software
      5m 4s
  4. 19m 41s
    1. Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop
      4m 9s
    2. Choosing Edit a Copy With Lightroom Adjustments
      5m 26s
    3. Choosing Edit a Copy
      3m 59s
    4. Choosing Edit Original
      3m 34s
    5. Revisiting edits
      2m 33s
  5. 17m 9s
    1. Creating presets for editing in Photoshop
      4m 51s
    2. Passing photos to Photoshop with presets
      4m 48s
    3. Creating presets for editing in Elements
      3m 4s
    4. Passing photos to Elements with presets
      4m 26s
  6. 10m 44s
    1. Sorting and stacking edited photos in Lightroom
      5m 1s
    2. Synchronizing metadata between Lightroom and Bridge
      5m 43s
  7. 56m 22s
    1. Building a panorama with Lightroom and Photoshop
      6m 57s
    2. Creating an HDR image with Lightroom and Photoshop
      5m 51s
    3. Creating a Photoshop Smart Object from Lightroom
      6m 32s
    4. Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom
      4m 47s
    5. Applying photographic filters
      5m 33s
    6. Photo compositing
      7m 30s
    7. Making precise local corrections
      5m 28s
    8. Retouching and removing content
      6m 36s
    9. Enhancing photos with text and graphics
      7m 8s
  8. 39s
    1. Goodbye
      39s

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