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Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together
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Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom


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Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together

with Jan Kabili

Video: Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom

In this movie we are going to take a look at the last command in the Photo > Edit In menu in Lightroom, Open as Layers in Photoshop. You could use this command to take multiple images from Lightroom, and bring them into Photoshop into a single file, and you might do that for many purposes. Maybe you want to make a layered composite or put together some bracketed exposures of the same scene. In this case I'm going to show you a very unique technique in Photoshop for taking multiple images, each of which has a different point of focus and all of which have a shallow depth of field, and blend them together so that it looks like you have one single image with an extended depth of field.
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  1. 10m 38s
    1. Welcome
      36s
    2. Using the exercise files
      4m 4s
    3. Why use Lightroom and Photoshop together?
      5m 58s
  2. 16m 37s
    1. Setting Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop
      6m 20s
    2. Setting file naming preferences in Lightroom
      4m 27s
    3. Maximizing PSD compatibility in Photoshop
      4m 40s
    4. Matching color settings
      1m 10s
  3. 24m 25s
    1. Passing raw files from Lightroom to Photoshop
      8m 17s
    2. Handling mismatches with Open Anyway
      6m 21s
    3. Handling mismatches with Render using Lightroom
      4m 43s
    4. Updating your software
      5m 4s
  4. 19m 41s
    1. Passing non-raw photos from Lightroom to Photoshop
      4m 9s
    2. Choosing Edit a Copy With Lightroom Adjustments
      5m 26s
    3. Choosing Edit a Copy
      3m 59s
    4. Choosing Edit Original
      3m 34s
    5. Revisiting edits
      2m 33s
  5. 17m 9s
    1. Creating presets for editing in Photoshop
      4m 51s
    2. Passing photos to Photoshop with presets
      4m 48s
    3. Creating presets for editing in Elements
      3m 4s
    4. Passing photos to Elements with presets
      4m 26s
  6. 10m 44s
    1. Sorting and stacking edited photos in Lightroom
      5m 1s
    2. Synchronizing metadata between Lightroom and Bridge
      5m 43s
  7. 56m 22s
    1. Building a panorama with Lightroom and Photoshop
      6m 57s
    2. Creating an HDR image with Lightroom and Photoshop
      5m 51s
    3. Creating a Photoshop Smart Object from Lightroom
      6m 32s
    4. Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom
      4m 47s
    5. Applying photographic filters
      5m 33s
    6. Photo compositing
      7m 30s
    7. Making precise local corrections
      5m 28s
    8. Retouching and removing content
      6m 36s
    9. Enhancing photos with text and graphics
      7m 8s
  8. 39s
    1. Goodbye
      39s

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Using Lightroom and Photoshop Together
2h 36m Intermediate Oct 05, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

By combining Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop, you can take full advantage of each program's capabilities. Use Lightroom for photo organizing, sharing, and basic image enhancement. When you need more advanced retouching and editing features, one click sends a photo from Lightroom to Photoshop.

In this course, photographer and author Jan Kabili shows how to combine both programs. The course begins with details on how to set up the two programs for maximum compatibility. The course then covers strategies for working with photos in a variety of formats, sending them from Lightroom to Photoshop to viewing the edited results in Lightroom. The final chapter demonstrates several real-world scenarios for using Lightroom and Photoshop together.

Topics include:
  • Setting the Lightroom preferences for editing in Photoshop
  • Passing photos from Lightroom to Photoshop
  • Handling software version mismatches
  • Viewing and organizing Photoshop-edited photos in Lightroom
  • Creating Lightroom presets for external editing
  • Using Lightroom with Photoshop Elements
  • Building a panorama with Lightroom and Photoshop
  • Passing multiple photos to Photoshop for compositing
  • Sending photos to Photoshop for retouching and removing content
  • Bringing photos into Photoshop to add text and graphics
Subjects:
Photography Photo Management
Software:
Photoshop Lightroom
Author:
Jan Kabili

Opening as layers in Photoshop from Lightroom

In this movie we are going to take a look at the last command in the Photo > Edit In menu in Lightroom, Open as Layers in Photoshop. You could use this command to take multiple images from Lightroom, and bring them into Photoshop into a single file, and you might do that for many purposes. Maybe you want to make a layered composite or put together some bracketed exposures of the same scene. In this case I'm going to show you a very unique technique in Photoshop for taking multiple images, each of which has a different point of focus and all of which have a shallow depth of field, and blend them together so that it looks like you have one single image with an extended depth of field.

Well, why you would want to do that? It's because when you're shooting photos the available light sometimes forces you to open you F stop so wide that you can't capture the depth of field that you would like. So this is a work around for that situation. When you are shooting with this technique in mind, I suggest you put your photo on a tripod and your exposure and focus settings to manual. Set your exposure and leave it there, and change only one thing between shots, the point of focus, as I've done in these five images. The first thing I'm going to do is to make some adjustments to the first image.

Because I shot all these photos in the same light, I can adjust one and then apply my adjustments to all of them, a real timesaver. So with that first photo selected, I'll go to the Basic panel and I'll tweak some sliders. And now I'm going to synchronize those adjustments to the other four images. So with the first one selected, I'll hold the Shift key and click the last thumbnail in the filmstrip. Now the frame around the first one should be brighter than the frames around all of the other four, because the first image is the one from which I am going to take the settings. It's the most selected image.

Now I'll just click the Sync button at the bottom of the column on the right, I'll make sure everything is checked and I'll click Synchronize. That applies the same adjustments to the other four photos as well. Now it's time to take these four photos and pass them over to Photoshop as layers in a single file. With all five images still selected in the filmstrip, I'll go to the Photo menu and choose Edit In, and I'll go all the way to the bottom of that menu, Open as Layers in Photoshop. Lightroom passed over to Photoshop all five photos and stacked them into the layers that you see here in the Layers panel in a single document.

The next thing I want to do is have Photoshop align all these layers so that their content lines up. So with the top layer selected, I'll hold the Shift key and select the bottom layer and then I'll go to the Edit menu and I'll choose Auto-Align Layers. I'll leave all these setting at their defaults in the Auto-Align Layers dialog and I'll click OK. There are a few transparent pixels along the edges, indicating that Photoshop did rotate some of these layers to get them to line up perfectly. Now the real magic happens. With all five layers still selected in the Layers panel, I'm going to go over to the Edit menu, and this time I'll choose Auto-Blend Layers.

In the Auto-Blend Layers dialog, I'm going to leave Stack Images selected, because I'm not making a Panorama. I just want the images to be blended in a stack. And I do want to leave Seamless Tones and Colors checked, so that Photoshop does its best to blend the tones and colors in the five images. I'll click OK. Photoshop has now blended all five images together and look at the result. Remember that each of the five images had only one bottle in focus to start and now I have a single image in which all five bottles appear to be in focus, that's pretty amazing.

And if you look in the Layers panel, you can see that Photoshop accomplished that by creating these intricate layer masks, which it added to each layer. At this point if you wanted to, you could get the Crop tool and crop away these transparent pixels. I'm just going to leave them there for now, I'll take care of them in a minute. I'd actually like to apply a filter to this image, but when I go to the Filter menu I see that most of them are grayed out. So in order to apply filters or some other Photoshop features, I'm going to have to first take the image back to Lightroom and then bring it back to Photoshop, at which point all of these layers will be flattened and I'll have all the Photoshop tools available.

So I'll press Cmd+S, Ctrl+S on the PC, and I'll close the resulting TIFF. I'll go back to Lightroom, and in the filmstrip in Lightroom, you can see I have not only my first five raw files, I also have a TIFF, which was created in that Lightroom to Photoshop workflow. The TIFF format and the file name are derived from choices I made earlier in Lightroom's External Editing Preferences. I'm not done with this image yet, I'd also like to try to straighten up the bottles a little bit, and I think that the perfect feature to do that is a filter in Photoshop, the Adaptive Wide Angle filter. So in the next movie, I'll take this TIFF file back into Photoshop, as an example of yet another practical reason to use Photoshop with Lightroom.

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