Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Lightroom 4 Essentials: 01 Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module

Including multiple images in Photoshop as layers


From:

Lightroom 4 Essentials: 01 Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module

with Chris Orwig
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 1s
    1. Welcome
      1m 1s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 0s
  2. 13m 33s
    1. The broad Photoshop Lightroom overview
      3m 52s
    2. The photographic workflow puzzle
      3m 45s
    3. Why use Photoshop Lightroom?
      5m 56s
  3. 30m 18s
    1. The Photoshop Lightroom interface
      5m 21s
    2. Using the interface shortcuts
      4m 57s
    3. Working with panels
      4m 24s
    4. Customizing the identity plate and module pickers
      5m 49s
    5. Customizing interface elements
      5m 5s
    6. Creating a custom panel end mark
      3m 45s
    7. Using module tips
      57s
  4. 36m 32s
    1. Importing images and looking at file formats
      5m 27s
    2. Importing preferences
      3m 13s
    3. Introducing the Import dialog
      5m 10s
    4. Setting catalog preferences and import and preview options
      5m 38s
    5. Importing from a folder
      4m 2s
    6. Importing photos from a CF card
      10m 22s
    7. Creating an import preset
      2m 40s
  5. 11m 37s
    1. Drag-and-drop importing
      2m 8s
    2. Auto-importing from a watched folder
      4m 48s
    3. Importing from iPhoto or Aperture
      4m 41s
  6. 9m 36s
    1. Introducing tethered capture
      3m 47s
    2. Working with tethered capture
      2m 55s
    3. Considering color management with tethered capture
      2m 54s
  7. 24m 21s
    1. Introducing catalogs
      3m 12s
    2. Demystifying catalogs by way of comparison
      3m 34s
    3. Optimizing and backing up catalogs
      6m 13s
    4. Importing and updating legacy catalogs
      6m 38s
    5. Exporting a catalog
      3m 53s
    6. Learning more about catalogs
      51s
  8. 41m 51s
    1. Working in the Grid and Loupe views
      2m 14s
    2. Navigating and zooming
      4m 47s
    3. Customizing the Grid and Loupe views
      5m 14s
    4. Customizing the Filmstrip
      3m 17s
    5. Comparing two images
      5m 23s
    6. Surveying two or more images
      3m 15s
    7. Working with folders and files
      4m 2s
    8. Deleting and removing images from folders
      3m 1s
    9. Working with multiple hard drives
      8m 2s
    10. Dual-monitor support
      2m 36s
  9. 30m 25s
    1. Working with flags, stars, and labels
      5m 20s
    2. Adding ratings with the Painter tool
      3m 32s
    3. Filtering by flag, stars, and labels
      3m 58s
    4. A filtering workflow
      5m 54s
    5. Filtering by file type
      1m 54s
    6. Filtering by type and metadata
      3m 22s
    7. Sorting photos
      1m 58s
    8. Stacking photos into groups
      4m 27s
  10. 21m 51s
    1. Using Smart Collections
      4m 7s
    2. Using Quick Collections
      2m 25s
    3. What is a collection?
      3m 39s
    4. Working with collections
      3m 22s
    5. Going further with collections
      3m 17s
    6. An evaluative-collection workflow
      5m 1s
  11. 12m 23s
    1. Overviewing the new Map module
      2m 32s
    2. Tagging images with locations
      3m 46s
    3. Creating saved locations
      6m 5s
  12. 10m 44s
    1. Using Quick Develop
      3m 39s
    2. Synchronizing settings
      3m 12s
    3. Making incremental adjustments
      3m 53s
  13. 31m 41s
    1. Playing video in Photoshop Lightroom
      3m 50s
    2. Trimming a video
      4m 11s
    3. Editing the color and tone of a video
      5m 2s
    4. Using presets to edit the color and tone of a video
      1m 49s
    5. Setting the poster frame
      1m 35s
    6. Capturing a still image from a video
      3m 9s
    7. Exporting to a hard drive
      2m 37s
    8. Publishing to a hard drive
      3m 35s
    9. Publishing video to Facebook
      3m 18s
    10. Publishing video to Flickr
      2m 35s
  14. 17m 11s
    1. Why use DNG?
      7m 32s
    2. Converting to DNG and the Embed Fast Load Data option
      3m 45s
    3. Reducing file size with the lossy compressed DNG
      5m 54s
  15. 22m 39s
    1. Adding keywords
      3m 33s
    2. Creating and using keyword sets
      3m 6s
    3. Synchronizing keywords
      1m 58s
    4. Keywording with the Painter tool
      1m 29s
    5. Working with the Metadata panel
      4m 44s
    6. Adding copyright metadata with a template
      4m 23s
    7. Filtering photographs based on metadata
      3m 26s
  16. 27m 34s
    1. External editing preferences
      5m 14s
    2. Editing raw photos in Photoshop
      4m 43s
    3. Editing an original TIFF, PSD, or JPG file in Photoshop
      3m 40s
    4. Editing a modified TIFF, PSD, or JPG file in Photoshop
      4m 44s
    5. Opening an image as a Smart Object in Photoshop
      4m 34s
    6. Including multiple images in Photoshop as layers
      4m 39s
  17. 29m 1s
    1. Exporting photographs to a hard drive, CD, or DVD
      4m 44s
    2. Publishing to a folder
      4m 5s
    3. Using exporting presets
      4m 51s
    4. Emailing photographs from Photoshop Lightroom
      5m 34s
    5. Exporting to Adobe Revel
      3m 39s
    6. Uploading photos to Facebook and Flickr
      6m 8s
  18. 32s
    1. Goodbye
      32s

Video: Including multiple images in Photoshop as layers

In many occasions, opening up one image at a time, well that will be enough. Yet, there will be those other situations where it would really be nice if you could open up say two, three, four images at a time and have those all in one Photoshop document as different layers. What would be an occasion for that? Well, maybe you are working on a composite, perhaps you have a group photograph and you need to composite an expression from one image to another in order to finish that image off. Or maybe it's a creative composite, or maybe you are compositing based on exposure and you want to combine two different exposures together in Photoshop. Or maybe like in this scenario, you have one image here that you like, and then another that you like, and it would be kind of fun to put these side-by-side.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Lightroom 4 Essentials: 01 Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module
6h 13m Beginner Mar 05, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Join photographer and author Chris Orwig in Photoshop Lightroom 4 Essentials: Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module, as he explores the interface of this popular image-management program and shows how to use its Library module to organize and manage a photo library. The course covers importing both still images and video; shooting in tethered-capture mode; organizing and rating images with flags, stars, labels, and location tags; and working with collections. The course also details how to export, email, and share photos, and introduces the Lightroom 4 video-editing features, as well as its ability to work together with the full editing power of Photoshop. Exercise files are included with the course.

Topics include:
  • Customizing the interface
  • Importing from a memory card
  • Auto-importing from a watched folder
  • Considering color management with tethered capture
  • Working with catalogs
  • Comparing two images in a library
  • Working with multiple hard drives
  • Stacking photos in groups
  • Using smart collections and quick collections
  • Using Quick Develop to process images
  • Editing the color and tonality of video
  • Adding copyright data to photographs
  • Exporting, emailing, and publishing photographs
Subjects:
Photography Photo Management Sharing Photos
Software:
Lightroom
Author:
Chris Orwig

Including multiple images in Photoshop as layers

In many occasions, opening up one image at a time, well that will be enough. Yet, there will be those other situations where it would really be nice if you could open up say two, three, four images at a time and have those all in one Photoshop document as different layers. What would be an occasion for that? Well, maybe you are working on a composite, perhaps you have a group photograph and you need to composite an expression from one image to another in order to finish that image off. Or maybe it's a creative composite, or maybe you are compositing based on exposure and you want to combine two different exposures together in Photoshop. Or maybe like in this scenario, you have one image here that you like, and then another that you like, and it would be kind of fun to put these side-by-side.

You know how you can do that in Lightroom? You click on one, you hold down Command or Ctrl+Click on the other image and then you go to say this Compare or Survey view. Now, when you go to that view, you get to see the images side-by-side, and it's just kind of interesting. And you think to yourself, yeah, this would be fun as a diptych, which means having two images next to each other. What I want to do is I want to arrange those two images side-by-side in Photoshop. Keep in mind of course, you could arrange three, or four, five or whatever it is as well.

I am just going to do two for demo purposes. Well, in order to open these files as layers in Photoshop, you can right-click or Ctrl+Click on top of one of the images. We could do that here in the Survey or Compare view or in the Filmstrip or in the Grid view. All that you do is right-click or Ctrl+ Click, choose Edit In, and then navigate to the bottom of this menu over here which is Open as Layers in Photoshop. In this case, we will go ahead and open this up.

This says, we will need some Camera RAW plug-in. Fine! We will open these anyway. We know Photoshop is set up with that plug-in, and now we have these files open inside of this document. Let's take a look. Well, here I am going to go ahead and expand this a little bit just to cover up more and we have two different layers. I am going to reorder my layers for a moment. You will notice that I have one image which is much smaller than the other. Now, why is that? Well, why that is, is these particular JPEGs were just different sizes. So the reason why I want to use these files was to illustrate that.

If you have various sized documents, well it's going to maintain whatever size they are. If they are RAW files, of course, it will bring them in their native RAW file size. If they are JPEGs or crop files like you can see here, well it's going to bring them in whatever size they are and just maintain that file size integrity, and that's a good thing. Well, in order to do a layout here, what I might do is click on the bottom image, and I will choose my Move tool. I am going to go to Edit, and then select Free Transform here. I am just going to free transform this so that these images are the same height.

Now again, I'm not trying to teach Photoshop but rather kind of go through a workflow of arranging things a little bit. I will drag this file off to the side here. Now that, that's off to the side, what I really need to do is to open up some canvas space. I can't see all of this image. Well, in order to do that, we can go to Image, and then choose Reveal All. That will extend the Photoshop canvas to include both pictures. Perfect! We can just use a Crop tool. Select the Crop tool and click-and-drag over this.

Now, if all of this Photoshop work is a little bit distracting or overwhelming or you don't know how to do this, well, don't worry. Again, I'm not trying to teach Photoshop here, but just illustrate how we could start to work with these files when we bring them into Photoshop. You could do anything that you know how to do here in Photoshop. In this case, I am just arranging two things side-by-side. Well, next of course, I need to save this out. Well, if I go to save this file, what will happen? File, I will choose Save. Then, we will say okay, we saved it.

It's now a TIF file because we have layers in it and then I'll go ahead and close it. Back inside of Lightroom, this document, this two images side-by-side, well it's now part of my Lightroom catalog. That's a great thing of course about Lightroom and Photoshop as they communicate well together, they get along. The work we do in one application is remembered, or taken note of, or included in the other application, and then we can be on our way in order to continue to work in whatever way we need to. As you can see from this process, it opens up this new opportunity to open up two or more images from Lightroom into a single-layered Photoshop document in order to make corrections or creative enhancements or unique layouts like we did here.

There are currently no FAQs about Lightroom 4 Essentials: 01 Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Lightroom 4 Essentials: 01 Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked