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Exporting photos

From: Up and Running with Lightroom 5

Video: Exporting photos

When you're done processing a photo in Lightroom, you may be wondering how to get a copy of the photo with your adjustments to use outside of Lightroom. Your first instinct may be to try to save a copy of the photo in whatever format and size you need at the moment. But as you may have noticed, there is no Save button in Lightroom. Instead, you'll use the Export command. Which I'm going to cover in this movie. I'll start by selecting the files that I want to export either here in the Library module grid view or if I were in another module in the film strip. I'll click on this photo and shift click on this one. And then I'll open those into the Export dialogue box by going up to the File menu and choosing Export.

Exporting photos

When you're done processing a photo in Lightroom, you may be wondering how to get a copy of the photo with your adjustments to use outside of Lightroom. Your first instinct may be to try to save a copy of the photo in whatever format and size you need at the moment. But as you may have noticed, there is no Save button in Lightroom. Instead, you'll use the Export command. Which I'm going to cover in this movie. I'll start by selecting the files that I want to export either here in the Library module grid view or if I were in another module in the film strip. I'll click on this photo and shift click on this one. And then I'll open those into the Export dialogue box by going up to the File menu and choosing Export.

Or here in the Library module there's a big Export button at the bottom of the column on the left. Here in the Expert Dialogue box, I could start with any of the presets that come with Lightroom. These are just combinations of the settings on the right. So, let's create our own settings this time, walking through the settings in the sections on the right. First I'll go the Export to menu and I usually leave this set to hard drive. But if you want you can export directly to Email attaching these photos to an Email message in your default Email client.

Or you can burn the exported photos directly to a CD or DVD. I'll leave the set to hard drive. Next I'll choose the destination to which I'm going to export these photos. From this first menu, I can choose to export to a specific folder or to put this in the same folder as the original. By the way, it's okay to export to the same folder as the original because Lightroom will not write over your originals. I'm going to choose Specific folder and then I click Choose to specify a folder. I'd like to export to my desktop, so I'll navigate there and then I'll click Choose.

Now, rather than have the exported photos scattered around my desktop, I can create a sub-folder to put them in from right here in the Export dialogue box. So I'll check Put in Sub-Folder. And I'll create a new sub-folder, I'll call this one Website photos, because I'd like to create some jpegs to put on my website. And, then I'll click add to catalog and this will add the exported photos to my Lightroom catalog; in addition to the originals that are already there. This saves me the step of having to do that later by importing the exported jpegs.

In the next section, I have the option to rename the exported files. If I do that it won't change the name of the originals. I'll check rename to, and then I'll click this menu where I have a choice of a number of different file naming formulas. These are the same formulas that we saw when we were talking about renaming photos inside Lightroom. When I'm renaming photos on Export, I think it's a good idea to keep the original file number in the new file name so that I know which photo goes with which. So, I might choose Custom name, original file number here.

And then in the custom text field, I'll type some text that will appear at the beginning of the new name of each exported file. So, I might type my name in some circumstances, and underscore, or a hyphen, and maybe what the photos are for. What you type here depends on what you plan to do with the photos. And here you can see an example of how the photos will be named, with the file number of each photo inside the new name for the exported photos. I'm going to scroll down. In the next section there are some settings for exporting video, but I'm not exporting video right now so I'll skip over that. In the file setting section, I'll choose the format of the exported copies of my photos.

From the image format menu I see I have a choice of JPG, PSD or Photoshop document format, TIF format, DNG format. Which is Adobe's Open Source RAW format or original, which would keep the format of the exported files the same as the originals. I'll go with JPG because I'm trying to prepare some photos to post on my website. Depending on which format you choose, you may have some other options to set here in the file setting section. For JPGs, you can choose Image Quality.

And this sets the JPG compression quality. You can leave this at 100, or if you want your files to be smaller, you can move it down. I'll go with around 80, as a compromise between file size and quality. Now if you need your files to be no bigger than a certain file size in terms of size on disk. Then you can check limit file size too and type a number here, and that will cause light room to change the compression quality to meet that restriction. That isn't the case here so I'll uncheck that. And then I'll go to the colored space field where I'll choose a color profile to be imbedded in my exported files. If I were exporting a copy for print, or maybe to bring into Photoshop for further editing.

I would choose adobe RGB or pro photo RGB, both of which are wide color spaces. But a file with either of those two color spaces can look flat when you put it on the web. So I'm going to chose sRGB, when I'm exporting a photo for online use. That brings us to the image sizing section. Here, I can restrict the size of the exported photos if I've chosen JPEG, TIFF, or PSD as the export format. To do that, I'll check resize to fit, and then I can choose from the options in this menu.

I'm going to choose long edge and I'm going to specify a size in pixels. I'll type 400 here. And I'll make sure that this menu is set to pixels because I'm preparing these photos for the web. If I were preparing photos for print, then I could choose inches here. But I'll go with pixels. And the long edge choice guarantees that whether I'm exporting a landscape or portrait orientation photo, its longest edge won't be longer than 400 pixels. And it'll have the same aspect ration of width to height as my original. If I happen to be exporting some really small files, maybe some thumbnails to start with, I would check Don't Enlarge.

So that they wouldn't be enlarged to 400 pixels, but I'll leave that unchecked because I'm starting with large DNG RAW files here. Now because I'm exporting images that I'm sizing in pixels. It doesn't matter what's in the resolution field here. Because here, resolution refers to the number of pixels per inch. That would be allocated if this photo were going to print. So if I were going to print this photo on my desktop Ink Jet printer. I might type 300 pixels per inch here. Since it's going to the web it really doesn't matter what's here. I'll just leave it at it's default.

Now I'll come down to the output sharpening field. Almost every photo can benefit from a little sharpening, before output. Output sharpening is in addition to any sharpening you've already done, back in the detail panel in the develop module. So, you don't want to have gone too far with sharpening there. The amount of sharpening that's applied upon an output, depends on the size of the file, and it's destination. So I'll check sharpen for and then I'll specify what I'm going to use this file for. I'm putting it on the web, so the answer is screen. If I were printing, I would choose either matte paper or a glossy paper.

And I'll leave the amount of sharpening set to standard. Then I'll scroll down more. And here, I can specify the amount of metadata to include in the exported copies. I can choose between all meta data, a smaller sub set of meta data, copyright and contact information only or copyright only. I'll go with copyright only. And that will embed copyrights in the files but keep in mind that that doesn't print copyright information on the surface of the photos. If I want to do that, then I'll come down to the watermarking section and check watermark.

And if I leave that set to simple copyright watermark, Lightroom will add on the surface of each exported photo a copyright symbol and my name. If I want a more elaborate watermark, I can come to this menu and choose Edit Watermarks. And that will open a large dialogue box where I can create my own custom watermark that will appear on the surface of every exported photo. Now come down to post processing and here I'll tell like what I want it to do when its finished exporting this photos. I'd like to see the exported photos in the finder so I'll choose Show in Finder. Now if I thought I might want to apply all these settings to other photos in the future and not have to go through all these sections one by one. I might save this combination of settings as a preset. To do that I click the Add button.

I'll give my new preset a name. I'll call this website photo's. And I'm going to store this in my user presets. And I'll click Create. And here you can see my new user preset. And next time I want to apply this, I can do that from here inside the Export window or from the File menu. Now that I've set all these options, I'm going to come down and click the Export button. Here you can see a progress bar that tells me that Lightroom is exporting those photos. And applying all the settings that I chose to the exported copies. When the export is finished, Lightroom opened my finder window, so that I can see the exported copies of these photos.

With the format, the naming convention, and the size that I specified in the export dialogue box. Back in Lightroom, you can see my original photos here, and here, my new folders of the exported copies of those photos. In the future, if I wanted other copies of my originals in a different format, or with different names. I would just come back to my folder and export these again, with different settings. So that's how you can get copies of your processed files out of Lightroom. Now, you may think of the Export command as a sort of Save as command.

Because this is a way that you can get copies of your processed files out of white room, for use elsewhere.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Up and Running with Lightroom 5
Up and Running with Lightroom 5

40 video lessons · 19848 viewers

Jan Kabili
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 5m 24s
    1. Welcome
      1m 2s
    2. Using the exercise files
      4m 22s
  2. 30m 31s
    1. Understanding catalogs
      4m 21s
    2. Organizing your photos before importing
      3m 10s
    3. Deciding where to store your photos
      4m 28s
    4. Importing photos from a drive
      8m 14s
    5. Importing photos from a camera
      10m 18s
  3. 1h 15m
    1. Library module workspace
      7m 21s
    2. Viewing and sorting photos
      6m 16s
    3. Selecting photos
      7m 9s
    4. Reviewing and rating photos
      8m 41s
    5. Organizing with collections
      6m 27s
    6. Using Smart Collections
      6m 21s
    7. Keywording
      4m 51s
    8. Finding photos by keyword
      5m 40s
    9. Finding photos with the Metadata filter
      4m 53s
    10. Moving files and folders
      7m 16s
    11. Renaming photos
      4m 18s
    12. Working with Smart Previews when traveling
      6m 6s
  4. 54m 18s
    1. Develop module workspace
      6m 14s
    2. Cropping and straightening
      4m 25s
    3. Fixing perspective with Upright
      7m 19s
    4. Setting white balance
      4m 41s
    5. Using the histogram to evaluate tones
      4m 5s
    6. Adjusting tone and color in the Basic panel
      8m 45s
    7. Fine-tuning colors in the HSL panel
      3m 35s
    8. Converting to black and white
      3m 56s
    9. Using virtual copies
      3m 43s
    10. Reducing digital noise
      3m 24s
    11. Sharpening
      4m 11s
  5. 26m 21s
    1. Targeting edits with the Adjustment Brush
      6m 45s
    2. Spotlighting and vignetting with the Radial filter
      6m 0s
    3. Gradual editing with the Graduated filter
      4m 5s
    4. Removing dust spots with Spot Removal circles
      6m 12s
    5. Removing content with Spot Removal brushstrokes
      3m 19s
  6. 30m 40s
    1. Exporting photos
      9m 22s
    2. Setting up a connection to Facebook
      6m 22s
    3. Sharing photos to Facebook
      5m 44s
    4. Printing photos
      9m 12s
  7. 26s
    1. Next steps
      26s

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