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Exporting images for a Blurb photo book

From: Lightroom 3 Advanced Techniques

Video: Exporting images for a Blurb photo book

It is indeed a really exciting time for digital photography. And Blurb, and other bookmaking companies like Blurb, have all of a sudden given photographers this whole new way to assemble and create and print their own books. There's something special about binding images together inside of a book. It somehow creates a more cohesive set. You can tell a distinct story. If you haven't ever created a book, now is the time. So here, what I want to do in the beginning is talk about how we can first select our photographs that we want to use in a book project, and then take a look at how we can export those images in order to prepare those properly to print well inside of a Blurb book. All right! Well, first things first.

Exporting images for a Blurb photo book

It is indeed a really exciting time for digital photography. And Blurb, and other bookmaking companies like Blurb, have all of a sudden given photographers this whole new way to assemble and create and print their own books. There's something special about binding images together inside of a book. It somehow creates a more cohesive set. You can tell a distinct story. If you haven't ever created a book, now is the time. So here, what I want to do in the beginning is talk about how we can first select our photographs that we want to use in a book project, and then take a look at how we can export those images in order to prepare those properly to print well inside of a Blurb book. All right! Well, first things first.

Here I am, inside of this costa_rica folder. You'll notice that I have DNG files here. You want to start with your high-res files, your RAW files, your DNG files-- whatever those are, so that you make sure you have file sizes that are big enough to be printed at whatever size book you want to make. All right! The next thing we want to do is go through our photographs and somehow label or rank or rate those images. I'm going to do this pretty quickly. So I'll go ahead and start over at the beginning of the set and click on one image. Then I'll press my Arrow key to move through my photographs.

When I see a photograph that I like, I'm going to add a star rating. I'll press the 1 key to add a 1-star rating. I'm going to be pretty quick about this, just simply choosing some images that I think might be fun to include, or to print inside of a book project. So far, so good. Just making my way through here, and I'll select these guys as well. Now, when you're making your selections, you do want to think a little bit about narrative and about thread and what you're trying to communicate with a book. We'll talk a little bit more about that later.

I'll give you a resource to dig deeper into that topic. Here though, I want to focus in on the mechanics. I've selected my images. I'll go ahead and press the Backslash key in the Library module go to Attribute, and then say, just show me the images that have a one-star rating. Well, here they are. Looks like I have a duplicate, so I'll select one of those, and I'm going to remove that rating by pressing the 0 key. Okay, I have a nice little set of photos. Next thing I'm going to do is press Command+A on a Mac--Ctrl+A on Windows--to select all of those images, and then I'll create a collection.

Collections are a really nice way to group images together in a way that isn't contingent upon file or hard drive or a folder location. So here, we'll go to our Collections panel. We'll click the Plus icon, and then we'll choose Create Collection. We'll name this one "Costa Rica - Book." I want to include the selected photos in this collection, and here I will click Create. Now, I'm aware that I'm going a little bit quickly here, but I'm assuming that you already know how to add labels and stars and all of those things.

Also, I'm assuming you know a bit about collections. Well, now that we have this collection, what we need to do next is we need to export these 18 photographs. So here, we'll go into our collection, and we'll select all by pressing Command+A on a Mac--Ctrl+A on Windows. The next thing we need to do is to go to our File pulldown menu and then choose Export. Whenever you see "..." that tells you that if you click now, it will open a dialog. All right, well, what we want to do is we want to export to our hard drive.

Then we want to walk through our different settings here, and just dial these in so that they will work well for a Blurb book. First thing we want to do is select a folder. I've already created one on my Desktop, so I'm going to go ahead and choose that folder. It's called costa_rica. And then I'll click Choose. I'm going to go down File Naming. We'll go ahead and leave their names as is. That's fine. Next, for File Settings, this is actually where it gets pretty important. What we want to do is choose a JPEG format. That's a format that works really well with Blurb. And then for Color Space, we need to choose sRGB.

Now, I know a lot of people are thinking, "sRGB? Why is that? That's such a small color space." Well, that's the color space that Blurb uses, so we need to convert our images to sRGB, so that they look good when we start to assemble and build this book. We're going to check off this box. We don't want video files, of course. Our quality, crank that all the way up. We want full size JPEGs. Now making our way down, we don't need to do any image sizing. What about output sharpening? Now, this is actually a little bit debated.

There are those who say, you know what, you should do your input sharpening in Lightroom, make your images look good, and because you've done that, you don't need to do any more output sharpening, especially for Blurb type of books. Then I have a few other colleagues that say, well, you know what, I do both. I do some input sharpening in Lightroom. In the Develop module, I sharpen so it looks good to my eye. But then, I've found that Sharpen For, a Matte Paper, with Standard Amount looks well on Blurb. What you're going to have to do is experiment a little bit.

I think part of this has to do with the lenses that you use, how you shoot, whether you're shooting in a studio, or outdoors, or if it's journalistic, or what the exposure is like, and how your lenses and camera works together. So, for starters, what I would encourage is to actually leave your Output Sharpening off and to create your first book without that, and then go ahead and create a second version of your book. Now, I know that that will cost you something, but what you're going to need to do in order to create a good book is actually do a couple of tests, and see how it renders color, see how it deals with contrast, see how Blurb prints images in regards to sharpness. All right! Well, I'll go ahead and turn this one off, because we'll say this is my first book. These images are already sharp.

Then I'll scroll down. Metadata, don't need any of that. Watermarking, nothing. Post-Processing, again, I'll just have it do nothing there. Well, now that I've dialed in all of those settings, what I'm going to do is create a new preset for myself, and I'll go ahead and just call this one "Blurb." And I'll put it in my User Presets folder and click Create. Well, that way, whenever I want to access that, all that I need to do is to click on this Blurb preset, and then the one variable that I'll want to change will be the folder location where I'll save my files, so that each book project has its different and distinct folder, yet it will remember my file settings here, and it will speed up my overall process.

All right! Well, now that we've dialed in these different settings, we're ready to export. The next step is to simply click Export. Lightroom will now go through these files, and it will create these full-res JPEG sRGB files, and once this export is complete, I'll then be ready to start to assemble and to build my book. We'll talk about how we can do that in the next two movies.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Lightroom 3 Advanced Techniques
Lightroom 3 Advanced Techniques

91 video lessons · 17715 viewers

Chris Orwig
Author

 
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  1. 5m 57s
    1. Welcome
      2m 11s
    2. Strategies for success
      1m 49s
    3. Using the exercise files
      1m 57s
  2. 39m 0s
    1. Understanding how Lightroom, Bridge, and Photoshop work together
      6m 25s
    2. Working with Lightroom, Bridge, and Photoshop
      6m 35s
    3. Maximizing compatibility with Photoshop
      4m 7s
    4. Resolving Camera Raw mismatches
      7m 47s
    5. Customizing external editor naming
      3m 54s
    6. Stacking multiple photos
      5m 25s
    7. What to do when Bridge isn't seeing the raw adjustments
      4m 47s
  3. 18m 30s
    1. Setting up an additional external editor
      6m 38s
    2. Should I work with TIFF or PSD files?
      1m 3s
    3. Setting up an export preset
      4m 4s
    4. Integrating Photoshop actions into Lightroom
      6m 45s
  4. 11m 46s
    1. What are catalogs and why do they matter?
      3m 38s
    2. Where are my images?
      4m 2s
    3. The nuts and bolts of catalogs
      1m 52s
    4. Understanding catalogs, collections, and folders
      2m 14s
  5. 15m 22s
    1. Working with folders
      3m 22s
    2. Working with collections
      3m 55s
    3. The collections workflow
      8m 5s
  6. 16m 5s
    1. Exporting and importing catalogs
      7m 52s
    2. Diagramming multiple catalogs and computers
      2m 10s
    3. When to use multiple catalogs on one computer
      3m 40s
    4. Cleaning up the catalog mess
      2m 23s
  7. 10m 55s
    1. Catalog backup defaults
      4m 7s
    2. Performing a better catalog backup
      3m 45s
    3. Restoring from a backup catalog
      1m 27s
    4. Optimizing catalogs
      1m 36s
  8. 12m 24s
    1. Hard drive options
      9m 50s
    2. Further resources
      2m 34s
  9. 9m 46s
    1. Setting up tethered capture
      3m 12s
    2. Custom tethered capture white balance
      6m 34s
  10. 43m 38s
    1. Enhancing eyes
      8m 59s
    2. Whitening teeth
      2m 51s
    3. Smoothing skin
      6m 45s
    4. Reducing small blemishes
      6m 56s
    5. Darkening or dodging with the Adjustment brush
      2m 29s
    6. Adding dimensions and contrast
      4m 53s
    7. Retouching workflow with Photoshop and Lightroom, pt. 1: Reducing blemishes
      7m 10s
    8. Retouching workflow with Photoshop and Lightroom, pt. 2: Smoothing skin
      3m 35s
  11. 21m 42s
    1. Understanding color space and preventing color profile mismatch
      3m 29s
    2. Monitor calibration with ColorMunki
      1m 5s
    3. Working with ColorChecker Passport
      59s
    4. Creating and exporting a ColorChecker Passport profile
      5m 44s
    5. Choosing and applying a profile
      6m 42s
    6. Saving a profile as a preset
      3m 43s
  12. 19m 0s
    1. Are your prints too dark?
      5m 47s
    2. Monitor brightness presets
      3m 4s
    3. Custom grid layouts
      3m 38s
    4. Importing and exporting custom presets
      2m 31s
    5. Exporting from Lightroom to Pictage
      4m 0s
  13. 20m 19s
    1. Designing a custom watermark in Photoshop
      7m 0s
    2. Implementing a custom watermark
      3m 54s
    3. Using a custom watermark for effect in a slideshow
      5m 54s
    4. Using a custom watermark for effect in a web gallery
      3m 31s
  14. 15m 28s
    1. Exporting images for a Blurb photo book
      6m 45s
    2. Downloading and installing Blurb BookSmart
      44s
    3. Building and designing a Blurb book
      7m 59s
  15. 17m 26s
    1. Publishing to the iPhone or iPad
      8m 45s
    2. Publishing to Facebook
      2m 24s
    3. Publishing to Flickr
      3m 19s
    4. Publishing to SmugMug
      2m 58s
  16. 17m 31s
    1. Web galleries and web hosting
      2m 52s
    2. Creating and uploading a gallery
      6m 29s
    3. Popular web gallery plug-ins
      3m 10s
    4. Installing and uploading a web gallery plug-in
      5m 0s
  17. 25m 44s
    1. Exporting to burn on DVD or Blu-ray
      5m 33s
    2. Exporting to a blog
      9m 16s
    3. Exporting for the web
      3m 26s
    4. Exporting and posting a slideshow or video
      4m 34s
    5. Creating a Lightroom screensaver
      2m 55s
  18. 10m 10s
    1. Creating a client web gallery template
      4m 1s
    2. Sending high-resolution images via FTP
      6m 9s
  19. 10m 23s
    1. Emailing images from Lightroom
      5m 31s
    2. Emailing images from Lightroom with Gmail
      4m 52s
  20. 11m 59s
    1. Installing plug-ins
      6m 17s
    2. Accessing plug-ins
      3m 10s
    3. Creative plug-in resources
      2m 32s
  21. 45m 6s
    1. General navigation shortcuts
      6m 21s
    2. Importing shortcuts
      5m 49s
    3. Library module shortcuts
      8m 15s
    4. Develop module shortcuts, pt. 1
      4m 42s
    5. Develop module shortcuts, pt. 2
      4m 29s
    6. Develop module shortcuts, pt. 3
      5m 24s
    7. Develop module shortcuts, pt. 4
      3m 39s
    8. Develop module shortcuts, pt. 5
      5m 11s
    9. Shortcut resources
      1m 16s
  22. 6m 13s
    1. General tips
      2m 28s
    2. Increasing the cache size for greater speed
      3m 45s
  23. 55s
    1. Goodbye
      55s

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