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Applying masks

From: Keynote '09 Essential Training

Video: Applying masks

Masks allow you to crop and resize your images within the Keynote application itself, giving you a fast and easy way to get your images to fit just right. Let's look at a mask right now. This particular slide here I'm going to click on, you see this control come up for Edit mask. That's letting us know that this particular photograph has a mask associated with it. We double click on the image and you can see grayed out here. This is the actual size of this particular image and this area, the one that we were seeing was the masked part of that. In fact, all three images on this side have been masked off. But let's recreate this leftmost image in the next slide. We'll go down to Slide 2, which is the same slide but without that image. Go up to the Media Browser and we'll pull over 848 front and let go and you can see indeed it is rather large.

Applying masks

Masks allow you to crop and resize your images within the Keynote application itself, giving you a fast and easy way to get your images to fit just right. Let's look at a mask right now. This particular slide here I'm going to click on, you see this control come up for Edit mask. That's letting us know that this particular photograph has a mask associated with it. We double click on the image and you can see grayed out here. This is the actual size of this particular image and this area, the one that we were seeing was the masked part of that. In fact, all three images on this side have been masked off. But let's recreate this leftmost image in the next slide. We'll go down to Slide 2, which is the same slide but without that image. Go up to the Media Browser and we'll pull over 848 front and let go and you can see indeed it is rather large.

It will be close to my Media browser out here. And let me open up my Inspector and click on the Metrics inspector. So you can see it's a fairly large photograph that's here, it is 1617 wide and with this photograph selected, I'm going to go up here in the toolbar and click on the Masks button and that gives me a default mask size. So notice these boundary handles here. These represent the boundaries of the mask itself. The gray parts, you can see the edge. This represents the original photograph and I can change the mask boundary the way I want to and if I click off of that, you can see now it's created it's own independent image. Now if I want to go back to my original and change that, I can, up here in the Metrics inspector I can click on original size and it comes right back. So let me mask it again.

Now it's helpful to see that this Mask Editing mode has about three states, if you will. This first state here with the hand showing and the mask control window up means I can grab and I can move the image around within the mask itself with the mask staying static. If I let go, I can also, with that same Hand tool, grab the handle of the photograph itself. Here you can see I can scale it that way. I can also scale it in this mode by clicking on this slider within the mask control and scaling the image that way.

So now, you might be asking where are the controls for the mask edge. Well, if I click on that edge once, it will bring that part back up and I can reedit the mask edges again. In fact what I'm going to do now is line it up with the existing photographs at the top there, grab the bottom there. And I can also move the entire mask and keep the photograph still. If I grab that edge right here, click and hold. Now I'm just dragging sideways.

Now notice that I'm only moving the mask. The photograph is not moving with me. So it's good to be conscious of what part of this editing state you are in. For instance, now if I rollover and that hand appears, if I click and hold, now I can just move the photograph but the mask will stay in place. I align it up pretty much to where original one was. Out there and then click off. And then the third state is this final state, which is, if I grab the handle of this object now, it's going to let me scale the fully masked object.

So the entire object now is treated almost like a new photograph and the entire masked photograph will scale if I grab that particular corner and I can give this object a frame like the other ones. Go to Picture frame, drop it down to little 40s and I can scale this just like I can in the other object. Now let's go to slide 3. Let me close up my Inspector window here. Let's say you are given the task of making all of these photographs have round corners.

The design I came to is that I need these with round corners. What can you do? Well you can also build masks using existing shapes. And we're going to do that on this particular slide. I'm going to go up here to Shapes and I'm going to pull down a curved rectangle and I'm going to drag it over this photo to get in the center. Then I'm going to grab a corner and holding the Option key so it stays centered. I'm going to grab it up and you can see there it locks in to the size of the existing photograph. Now we wanted a radius change, so I'll pull on this Radius tool and increase the radius of that curve to give it a little bit more curviness and because I want that same shape to mask across the other photographs, I'm going to hold down the Option key, click and hold and that allows me to duplicate this slide and while still holding the Option key, I'm going to click and hold again.

You can see I can move that shape over to that one as well for not the mask yet but that's what we are going to do next. If I marquee select both of them, so now I have both the mask and the photograph selected. I'll go up here to the Format menu and pull down the mask with selected shape. And when I choose that, you can see what happens. It created a mask based on that shape. If I click off, you will see very clearly it created a curved shape of the mask around that photograph, perfect. I'll do the same thing. Now let me select both of these and go up to Format.

Oops, it won't work, why wouldn't it work? We can only do one at a time. Keynote doesn't know which shape is going to mask which object in this particular case. So you can do that one at a time. So I'll Marquee select both of those and now you see that command comes up, Mask with Selected Shape. Format > Mask with selected shape. That looks great. Now suddenly you realize, oops! I forgot to do this bottom 3. How do I get that shape back? Now what you can do is click on one of those and up here in the Format menu, choose Unmask.

What that does is that will bring it back to the original photograph and the shape for which you made that mask. So let me click off of that, click on that shape again, hold down the Option key and drag so now I'm duplicating it again and I won't make that same mistake. I'll copy it there, click and hold Option key, drag it over here and again Option+ Drag over there. Now I'll marquee select this object again and I can do it fast with masking Shift+Command+M, select that, Shift+ Command+M, Shift+Command+M. Now notice that it's showing me the original size of the photograph. That's okay. It's all being masked up but it is helpful. It gives you little reminder that, hey, there is a pretty big photograph behind there in case you care and then Command+Shift here, same thing, click off and there I have my masks for my shapes.

So the upshot is that the flexibility of the mask function that's built into Keynote allows you to focus your energies on building your presentation story rather than spending your time in an external editor, cropping and masking your images.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Keynote '09 Essential Training
Keynote '09 Essential Training

59 video lessons · 29810 viewers

Craig Syverson
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 6s
    1. Welcome
      1m 15s
    2. Using the exercise files
      51s
  2. 13m 57s
    1. Exploring the user interface
      3m 54s
    2. Customizing the user interface
      2m 11s
    3. Using the Media Browser
      1m 42s
    4. Understanding the Document Warning
      2m 57s
    5. Understanding Keynote themes
      3m 13s
  3. 13m 8s
    1. Understanding master slides
      4m 45s
    2. Making changes to slides and masters
      3m 54s
    3. Creating a media placeholder on a master slide
      2m 18s
    4. Creating an object placeholder on a master slide
      2m 11s
  4. 12m 53s
    1. Layout and alignment of objects
      7m 28s
    2. Understanding stacking order
      5m 25s
  5. 35m 44s
    1. Working with free text objects
      4m 23s
    2. Comparing types of text objects
      4m 14s
    3. Formatting text in Keynote
      4m 5s
    4. Working with shape objects
      6m 40s
    5. Working with advanced shapes and colors
      5m 44s
    6. Using connection lines
      4m 40s
    7. Adding hyperlinks
      5m 58s
  6. 32m 43s
    1. Adding and formatting tables
      4m 16s
    2. Building conditional formatting and calculations
      4m 48s
    3. Chart types
      3m 44s
    4. Working with chart data
      5m 17s
    5. Formatting charts
      6m 10s
    6. Working with 3D charts
      5m 10s
    7. Linking charts with Numbers '09
      3m 18s
  7. 29m 17s
    1. Working with graphic files
      7m 49s
    2. Working with multimedia files
      4m 41s
    3. Applying masks
      6m 55s
    4. Applying image adjustments
      4m 15s
    5. Using the Instant Alpha tool
      5m 37s
  8. 18m 8s
    1. Using 2D and 3D transitions
      6m 11s
    2. Creating transitions with text effects
      3m 9s
    3. Creating transitions with object effects
      4m 16s
    4. Introducing Magic Move
      4m 32s
  9. 30m 27s
    1. Using basic build parameters
      7m 33s
    2. Expanding on basic builds
      5m 20s
    3. Creating table and chart builds
      6m 41s
    4. Using smart builds
      3m 21s
    5. Building basic actions
      3m 43s
    6. Creating actions on a path
      3m 49s
  10. 28m 36s
    1. Using the Document Inspector
      5m 39s
    2. Organizing slides in the slide navigator
      2m 57s
    3. Organizing a presentation in Outline mode
      2m 54s
    4. Playing a slideshow
      2m 46s
    5. Adding notes
      1m 42s
    6. Using the Presenter Display
      5m 21s
    7. Recording narration for a slideshow
      3m 2s
    8. Using remote controls
      4m 15s
  11. 34m 54s
    1. Saving Keynote files
      5m 39s
    2. Saving a Keynote presentation as a PowerPoint file
      2m 17s
    3. Exporting presentations as PDFs
      3m 56s
    4. Sharing a Keynote presentation as a QuickTime movie
      7m 57s
    5. Exporting presentations as still images
      2m 14s
    6. Adding comments on a presentation
      1m 42s
    7. Collaborating with iWork.com
      7m 54s
    8. Printing presentations
      3m 15s
  12. 21s
    1. Goodbye
      21s

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