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Exploring major workflow steps

From: Up and Running with Autodesk Inventor

Video: Exploring major workflow steps

When starting a new course on Autodesk Inventor, I find it very helpful to step back and provide everyone with an overview of what Autodesk Inventor does and go over a few of the basic workflow steps, so everyone has a good understanding of why we're here and where we're going. During this course, we will be working with a small engine that you might find in an RC boat. But to cover the basic workflow concepts, I like to fall back to the toys that allow me to do the things I do today, the trusty LEGO. The reason for this is nearly everyone on the planet will recognize what they are and how they work without too much explanation, and it allows me to easily explain the concepts.

Exploring major workflow steps

When starting a new course on Autodesk Inventor, I find it very helpful to step back and provide everyone with an overview of what Autodesk Inventor does and go over a few of the basic workflow steps, so everyone has a good understanding of why we're here and where we're going. During this course, we will be working with a small engine that you might find in an RC boat. But to cover the basic workflow concepts, I like to fall back to the toys that allow me to do the things I do today, the trusty LEGO. The reason for this is nearly everyone on the planet will recognize what they are and how they work without too much explanation, and it allows me to easily explain the concepts.

I see Legos as one of the most basic physical prototyping tools around. You have a bucket of standard parts, and you snap them together in different configurations to build anything you could dream of. Autodesk Inventor is a digital prototyping tool that allows you to build parts like a single Lego brick, or parts of an engine, and then put them together and test how they would function before you actually manufacture any real parts. But an Autodesk Inventor, rather than starting with a bunch of predefined bricks that you might pull out of a bucket stored in the closet, you're actually pulling parts that you've built from a folder on your hard drive.

The workflow in Inventor can be broken down into three major steps, building parts, assembling parts, and documenting your designs with drawings. When building parts, you'll sketch 2D shapes and use modeling operations to add and remove material to sculpt a part. I've captured a few images to help show how you might build a simple LEGO brick in Inventor so that you can better understand the process. Once you've built the parts needed for your design, you can begin pulling them into an assembly file and connecting them, in this case, to build a simple LEGO house.

Once you understand the software, you'll be able to build much more complex parts and assemble those to build something more advanced. Last but certainly not least, you must be able to document your designs so that when the time comes, you can have those parts manufactured. This will be done by creating views of your parts and assemblies that will be used to completely define how the part should be manufactured. The beauty of the entire system is that all the parts, assemblies, and drawings are connected. So if changes are made to any part, the assemblies that contain the part and the drawings all update instantly, so you can focus on improving your designs, rather than wasting time redrawing 2D views of your parts.

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This video is part of

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Up and Running with Autodesk Inventor

40 video lessons · 7796 viewers

John Helfen
Author

 
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  1. 1m 28s
    1. Welcome
      41s
    2. Using the exercise files
      47s
  2. 8m 3s
    1. Exploring major workflow steps
      2m 19s
    2. Reviewing different file types
      4m 43s
    3. Exploring essential settings
      1m 1s
  3. 21m 39s
    1. Navigating using the ViewCube
      3m 26s
    2. Navigating using the navigation tools
      5m 36s
    3. Using the browser
      3m 17s
    4. Using the ribbon bar
      2m 10s
    5. Using the Quick Access Toolbar
      1m 4s
    6. Customizing the toolbars
      3m 7s
    7. Using the Marking menu
      2m 59s
  4. 48m 42s
    1. Introducing sketching
      3m 18s
    2. Working with origin geometry
      3m 47s
    3. Understanding constraints
      8m 43s
    4. Drawing with the Line tool
      8m 8s
    5. Dimensioning a part
      5m 0s
    6. Creating parameters
      8m 50s
    7. Creating circles and rectangles
      10m 56s
  5. 38m 31s
    1. Introducing part modeling
      2m 34s
    2. Creating a base extrusion
      5m 12s
    3. Creating multiple extrusions
      7m 35s
    4. Creating a cone by revolving
      6m 12s
    5. Creating holes
      6m 12s
    6. Creating a threaded hole
      3m 3s
    7. Using placed features
      2m 33s
    8. Editing part features
      5m 10s
  6. 25m 52s
    1. Introducing assemblies
      54s
    2. Placing components
      6m 29s
    3. Creating and managing constraints
      7m 50s
    4. Assembling parts
      7m 16s
    5. Understanding the Insert constraint
      3m 23s
  7. 25m 12s
    1. Exploring initial drawing creation
      4m 43s
    2. Placing views
      6m 11s
    3. Creating section and detail views
      5m 10s
    4. Setting basic dimensions
      2m 43s
    5. Changing dimension precision
      1m 24s
    6. Creating baseline dimensions
      1m 52s
    7. Creating center lines, center marks, and hole notes
      3m 9s
  8. 1m 20s
    1. Next steps
      1m 20s

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