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Exploring initial drawing creation

From: Up and Running with Autodesk Inventor

Video: Exploring initial drawing creation

Now that we know how to create parts and assemblies, it's time to talk about how to document your designs. In order to get a part or an assembly manufactured, you're almost always going to be required to create a drawing for manufacturing. To create a drawing, we're going to start by hitting the New button found in the Getting Started tab under the Launch panel. Because IDWs are the default drawing format in Inventor, we'll select the standard.idw file type, and Inventor will configure our initial drawing for us. Here on the screen you can see our initial drawing sheet.

Exploring initial drawing creation

Now that we know how to create parts and assemblies, it's time to talk about how to document your designs. In order to get a part or an assembly manufactured, you're almost always going to be required to create a drawing for manufacturing. To create a drawing, we're going to start by hitting the New button found in the Getting Started tab under the Launch panel. Because IDWs are the default drawing format in Inventor, we'll select the standard.idw file type, and Inventor will configure our initial drawing for us. Here on the screen you can see our initial drawing sheet.

This represents the piece of paper that your views are going to be printed on. On that sheet you can see a border has been added, and also a title block, and just like parts and assemblies, the browser represents what you are seeing on the screen. On the left you can see that Sheet 1 has been created for us, we have a default border that has been added, and a default title block. Above that in the browser you have a folder called Drawing Resources. This is where Inventor stores all of the things that you can add to the sheet and also some preconfigured sheet formats that could help speed the drawing creation process.

Sheet formats are preconfigured layouts for drawings. For example, if you're going to create parts that are very similar all the time and that require the same types of views, you can lay out all your drawing views, select the sheet size, lay out the title block and border information, and save that configuration to the sheet format. That way the next time you go to create a drawing you can use a sheet format to automatically pre-configure all that information. Next we have Borders. As I mentioned, when you create a new drawing, Inventor is going to configure a border for you based on the sheet size.

If you don't like the default border that is being used, you can create your own, or in this case I'm going to just delete the one we have, and it's removed from the Graphics window. If I simply want to replace the drawing border and have Inventor preconfigured for me, I can double-click the default border in the browser. It preconfigures everything and replaces that drawing. I'm going to go ahead and remove that border one more time and show you another way to insert a border. Rather than just double-clicking, you can right- click on the default border and insert a drawing border.

This allows you to configure the zones that are laid out in your border to meet your design needs. I'm going to go ahead and leave the default settings, and hit OK, but I want to point out where the zones are. For example, if I'm working on a complex drawing, and I wanted to have somebody review a specific piece of information on the drawing sheet, I can help them locate the piece of information I'm looking for by telling them to look in zone D4, for example. You can see here D represents the rows, and 4 represents the columns. If I tell somebody to look in zone D4, they're going to look in this area of the drawing for the information we're discussing.

If the default borders don't work for you, you can right-click on the folder and select to define a new border. In most cases you're not going to do that, and if you do, I would highly recommend speaking with your CAD Manager because often companies have predefined borders, predefined title blocks, and predefined sheet layouts that are used on a regular basis in the company. Next, we have Title Blocks. By default, Inventor creates a couple of different title blocks for you based on the standard you select during install. In this case, we selected ANSI and two default title blocks were created for us.

I'm going to circle back to title blocks in just one minute. Before I do that, I'm going to talk about how to edit the sheet. One of the things you might need to change with the sheet is the sheet size, and this is where the title blocks and sheets are connected. If I hover over the sheet in a browser and right-click, I have the option to edit this sheet. I can change the name of the sheet, perhaps I want to name it to reflect the information that's on the sheet, or I could change the sheet size. Say, for example, I wanted to print this on an 8.5 by 11 sheet of paper, which is represented by the A sheet size.

I could select A from the list and hit OK and my sheet size changes and my title block is updated to indicate the new sheet size. The one thing that didn't change was the physical size of the title block in the drawing sheet space itself. We have the ANSI-Large title block listed, and it's physically a little bit larger for larger sheets. I'm going to go ahead and remove that from the drawing, and I can return to the Title Blocks folder and double-click my ANSI A to insert the smaller title block, and you can see that it now takes up less space on the sheet.

Again, just like Borders, Title Blocks can be configured as well, but I highly recommend talking to your CAD Manager to make sure that you are following common standards for your company.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Up and Running with Autodesk Inventor
Up and Running with Autodesk Inventor

40 video lessons · 7784 viewers

John Helfen
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 1m 28s
    1. Welcome
      41s
    2. Using the exercise files
      47s
  2. 8m 3s
    1. Exploring major workflow steps
      2m 19s
    2. Reviewing different file types
      4m 43s
    3. Exploring essential settings
      1m 1s
  3. 21m 39s
    1. Navigating using the ViewCube
      3m 26s
    2. Navigating using the navigation tools
      5m 36s
    3. Using the browser
      3m 17s
    4. Using the ribbon bar
      2m 10s
    5. Using the Quick Access Toolbar
      1m 4s
    6. Customizing the toolbars
      3m 7s
    7. Using the Marking menu
      2m 59s
  4. 48m 42s
    1. Introducing sketching
      3m 18s
    2. Working with origin geometry
      3m 47s
    3. Understanding constraints
      8m 43s
    4. Drawing with the Line tool
      8m 8s
    5. Dimensioning a part
      5m 0s
    6. Creating parameters
      8m 50s
    7. Creating circles and rectangles
      10m 56s
  5. 38m 31s
    1. Introducing part modeling
      2m 34s
    2. Creating a base extrusion
      5m 12s
    3. Creating multiple extrusions
      7m 35s
    4. Creating a cone by revolving
      6m 12s
    5. Creating holes
      6m 12s
    6. Creating a threaded hole
      3m 3s
    7. Using placed features
      2m 33s
    8. Editing part features
      5m 10s
  6. 25m 52s
    1. Introducing assemblies
      54s
    2. Placing components
      6m 29s
    3. Creating and managing constraints
      7m 50s
    4. Assembling parts
      7m 16s
    5. Understanding the Insert constraint
      3m 23s
  7. 25m 12s
    1. Exploring initial drawing creation
      4m 43s
    2. Placing views
      6m 11s
    3. Creating section and detail views
      5m 10s
    4. Setting basic dimensions
      2m 43s
    5. Changing dimension precision
      1m 24s
    6. Creating baseline dimensions
      1m 52s
    7. Creating center lines, center marks, and hole notes
      3m 9s
  8. 1m 20s
    1. Next steps
      1m 20s

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