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The five kinds of style sheets

From: InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets

Video: The five kinds of style sheets

Alright. So we have seen the Eyedropper tool right here, which is certainly tricked out, it's the best implementation of an Eyedropper tool that I have seen. The only problem that I have with it and the reason that I don't actually use it on a regular basis when I'm laying out pages is that it really offers a strange marriage of convenience and inconvenience. On one hand you can just go ahead and lift some attributes and apply them very quickly to some other type inside of a document. On the other hand, if you want to lift some attributes and not other attributes, you have to actually dig in to the tool by double clicking on it, change some settings, click OK, go ahead and lift some new settings and on and on.

The five kinds of style sheets

Alright. So we have seen the Eyedropper tool right here, which is certainly tricked out, it's the best implementation of an Eyedropper tool that I have seen. The only problem that I have with it and the reason that I don't actually use it on a regular basis when I'm laying out pages is that it really offers a strange marriage of convenience and inconvenience. On one hand you can just go ahead and lift some attributes and apply them very quickly to some other type inside of a document. On the other hand, if you want to lift some attributes and not other attributes, you have to actually dig in to the tool by double clicking on it, change some settings, click OK, go ahead and lift some new settings and on and on.

So that part, I don't think is very convenient. The better way to work is to lay down some style sheets that represent the core formatting attributes that you are going to want to replicate over and over again. I'm here to tell you every single kind of text that I have inside of a document, every single word of text. Every single letter of text is linked to some style sheet by the time I get done with it. I recommend you do the same as well. They are that useful, that powerful, that you need to be using them on a regular basis.

So tell you what, in the remaining exercises of this chapter, I'm going to introduce you to style sheets, the five kinds of style sheets that are going on inside of InDesign. Probably it's going to go too quick for you by the way. So you may want to work along with me. You may want to just sit back and relax, and then in subsequent chapters, we will dig into each and every one of the various kinds of style sheets and see how they work. Alright. So it here goes. What I want you to do is, go up to the Type menu and notice that here is our first group of style sheets. There is Character Styles, and this command by the way brings up a palette.

All of the style sheets commands bring up palettes, because that's how you get to style sheets in InDesign. And some of them have keyboard shortcuts, like Shift+F11 here for the Character Styles. Character Styles affect independent characters of type or characters and words of type, and they allow you to store character level formatting attributes like typeface, and leading and type size and so on. Paragraph Styles affect entire paragraphs at a time and they go ahead and store not only paragraph level formatting attributes like alignment, and paragraph spacing, but also character level formatting attributes.

Then we have, if you go over here to the Window menu, you can see Object Styles, which also has a keyboard shortcut, Ctrl+F7, or Command+F7 on a Mac, for what it's worth. Object Styles allow you to go ahead and save object level formatting attributes, which include things like text wrap and anchored object settings and fill and stroke as well as potentially Paragraph Styles, which themselves can include Character Styles. So a lot of these styles include other types of style sheets as well. Then finally if we go down to Type & Tables here, you can see these guys in here, we have got Table Styles, which has no keyboard shortcut, which affects entire tables at a time and then Table Styles include Cell Styles, which style individual cells and they can include character and paragraph level styles as well as we will see.

Now in the remaining exercises of this chapter, I'm going to be focusing on the two most common and the two most useful kinds of style sheets in my estimation anyway, which are Paragraph Styles and Object Styles. Coming right up stay tuned.

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InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets

89 video lessons · 10822 viewers

Deke McClelland
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 49m 7s
    1. How style automation works and why every file needs it
      2m 26s
    2. Installing the DekeKeys shortcuts
      3m 58s
    3. Meet the Eyedropper tool
      5m 43s
    4. Using the "loaded" Eyedropper
      2m 23s
    5. Loading new attributes
      1m 33s
    6. Lifting some attributes (and not others)
      4m 19s
    7. Eyedropper FYIs
      4m 51s
    8. The five kinds of style sheets
      3m 16s
    9. Meet the paragraph style
      2m 46s
    10. Applying the Find/Change command
      3m 41s
    11. The style sheet domino effect
      4m 10s
    12. Meet the object style
      4m 19s
    13. Appending a paragraph style to an object style
      2m 5s
    14. The power of the local override
      3m 37s
  2. 30m 5s
    1. The most common and useful style sheet
      40s
    2. Creating a paragraph style
      3m 57s
    3. The Paragraph Style Options dialog box
      3m 56s
    4. Assigning a keypad shortcut
      3m 9s
    5. The better way to create a style
      1m 30s
    6. Basing one style on another
      3m 16s
    7. Assigning a Next Style setting
      2m 31s
    8. Creating a closed style loop
      1m 40s
    9. Using the Quick Apply function
      3m 30s
    10. Formatting an entire story in one click
      2m 43s
    11. Auto-formatting as you type
      3m 13s
  3. 20m 44s
    1. Style sheets are dynamic
      39s
    2. Changing the font for multiple style sheets
      4m 29s
    3. Updating a shared attribute
      2m 24s
    4. Type style, skew, and tracking
      4m 12s
    5. Clearing and integrating local overrides
      3m 6s
    6. Removing widows with Balance Ragged Lines
      2m 47s
    7. Additional tricks for clearing overrides
      3m 7s
  4. 35m 13s
    1. Styling words, numbers, and symbols
      1m 16s
    2. Organizing style sheets
      6m 14s
    3. Character styles protect overrides
      5m 21s
    4. Creating a character style
      3m 44s
    5. Prioritizing style sheet shortcuts
      5m 24s
    6. Applying your new character style
      2m 51s
    7. Updating two styles in one pass
      4m 24s
    8. When in doubt, be obsessive
      5m 59s
  5. 1h 17m
    1. Character styles on steroids
      1m 15s
    2. Repeating style elements
      4m 0s
    3. Establishing a nested style
      3m 32s
    4. Setting the range of a nested style
      4m 3s
    5. Troubleshooting the nested range
      6m 49s
    6. Assigning automatic numbers
      2m 13s
    7. Assigning automatic bullets
      4m 49s
    8. Starting and restarting numbered sequences
      4m 16s
    9. Nesting a number or bullet style
      4m 45s
    10. Setting precise guidelines
      6m 24s
    11. Right-aligning numbers
      7m 31s
    12. Center-aligning bullets
      4m 10s
    13. Auto-numbering figures
      3m 0s
    14. Creating a custom Number setting
      4m 18s
    15. Specifying a chapter number
      3m 9s
    16. Numbering across threaded frames
      4m 5s
    17. Using a "list" to number across stories
      4m 29s
    18. What you can and can't do
      4m 37s
  6. 53m 18s
    1. If you make tables, listen up
      1m 1s
    2. A tale of two tables: Introducing the document
      2m 15s
    3. Creating a cell style
      5m 8s
    4. Adjusting the Inset values
      3m 37s
    5. Formatting the body of a table
      4m 22s
    6. Creating and applying column styles
      5m 32s
    7. Creating an all-inclusive table style
      4m 42s
    8. Converting and styling a table
      4m 49s
    9. Fixing formatting errors
      4m 21s
    10. Fixing row height and column width
      5m 25s
    11. An argument for independent cell styles
      2m 33s
    12. Making a dependent cell style
      3m 26s
    13. Selectively applying a cell style
      6m 7s
  7. 1h 10m
    1. The convergence of very nearly everything
      1m 18s
    2. Updating a style from the Find Font command
      4m 24s
    3. Step, Repeat, and Distribute
      4m 57s
    4. Adding text; removing style
      3m 3s
    5. Object-level formatting attributes
      3m 48s
    6. Creating an object style
      3m 43s
    7. Creating paired paragraph styles
      6m 28s
    8. Nesting paired paragraph styles
      3m 9s
    9. Inline and above line graphics
      5m 19s
    10. Creating an anchored object
      6m 29s
    11. Viewing frames and threads
      3m 52s
    12. Creating an anchored object style
      3m 48s
    13. Establishing anchored object defaults
      3m 44s
    14. Problems? Fit the frame to the contents
      4m 35s
    15. Employing a highly selective object style
      5m 27s
    16. The best way to anchor objects
      2m 23s
    17. Moving and anchoring text and objects
      4m 4s
  8. 1m 7s
    1. Goodbye
      1m 7s

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