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Using rich black (percentages of CMYK)

From: InDesign CS5: Print Production Guidelines

Video: Using rich black (percentages of CMYK)

We're going to go ahead and take a look at when you would use rich black and how you create a rich black swatch. Rich black is needed when you have a large black coverage, because if you used 100% black ink when you print this job on a printing press, the black ink rollers couldn't keep up and you would get more of a gray, muddy look than a nice vibrant, rich black. So we're going to go ahead and look at our Separations Preview panel, and when we turn off our black plate, we can see that our entire cover goes away, which is a good indication this particular cover is currently 100% black.

Using rich black (percentages of CMYK)

We're going to go ahead and take a look at when you would use rich black and how you create a rich black swatch. Rich black is needed when you have a large black coverage, because if you used 100% black ink when you print this job on a printing press, the black ink rollers couldn't keep up and you would get more of a gray, muddy look than a nice vibrant, rich black. So we're going to go ahead and look at our Separations Preview panel, and when we turn off our black plate, we can see that our entire cover goes away, which is a good indication this particular cover is currently 100% black.

I'm going to go and create a new swatch. Open up my Swatches panel, and I'm going to deselect Name with Color Value and type in Rich Black. Next, I'm going to enter 60% Cyan, 40% Magenta, 20% Yellow, and 100% Black. When I click OK, it adds it to my Swatches panel. Next, I'm going to select my cover and I'm going to apply to the fill this rich black. When I close my Swatches panel and I hover over my cover, I can see it's now made up of 60% Cyan, 40% Magenta, 20% Yellow, and 100% Black.

These four percentages give you a nice vibrant, rich black, and now I can be ensured that I will get a nice rich black cover. One thing to keep in mind though, is if you're not printing a four-color job, this will added expense. If it's only intended to be a two-color job or even a one-color job, some people just simply add one of the process inks behind the black. So you want to make sure you talk to your printer and see how this is going to be printed.

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This video is part of

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InDesign CS5: Print Production Guidelines

42 video lessons · 15408 viewers

James Wamser
Author

 
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  1. 3m 19s
    1. Welcome
      54s
    2. Using the exercise files
      31s
    3. Asking the right questions before starting your document
      1m 54s
  2. 21m 59s
    1. Building documents correctly
      3m 9s
    2. Understanding facing pages vs. non-facing pages
      2m 8s
    3. Creating a four-page spread with a left-hand page 1
      1m 48s
    4. Creating a gatefold layout
      2m 7s
    5. Creating a letterfold layout
      2m 27s
    6. Creating a book cover layout for a perfect bound book
      3m 11s
    7. Creating a calendar layout
      3m 13s
    8. Creating a drill edge
      3m 56s
  3. 11m 16s
    1. Understanding the preflight settings
      4m 55s
    2. Creating profiles
      2m 26s
    3. Loading and embedding profiles
      1m 18s
    4. Looking at the results
      2m 37s
  4. 10m 13s
    1. Understanding process colors, spot colors, and the Ink Manager
      1m 57s
    2. Using overprint vs. knockout
      1m 46s
    3. Using rich black (percentages of CMYK)
      1m 44s
    4. Checking for unnamed colors
      2m 4s
    5. Using mixed inks and registration
      2m 42s
  5. 4m 25s
    1. Using layers
      2m 25s
    2. Understanding Conditional Text and GREP
      2m 0s
  6. 6m 6s
    1. Understanding document fonts
      1m 33s
    2. Avoiding common font problems
      2m 57s
    3. Choosing the best font formats
      1m 36s
  7. 9m 0s
    1. Looking at the Links panel
      1m 32s
    2. Customizing the Links panel
      1m 56s
    3. Understanding resolution and scaling
      2m 4s
    4. Understanding actual resolution vs. effective resolution
      1m 53s
    5. Choosing file formats
      1m 35s
  8. 6m 47s
    1. Understanding RGB and CMYK
      2m 13s
    2. Using ICC profiles
      2m 13s
    3. Converting from RGB to CMYK during PDF export
      2m 21s
  9. 7m 44s
    1. Understanding accurate soft proofing in Acrobat
      2m 32s
    2. Using the Separations Preview panel
      3m 16s
    3. Using the Flattener Preview panel
      1m 56s
  10. 11m 43s
    1. Packaging your files
      2m 0s
    2. Using Adobe PDF presets
      2m 2s
    3. Understanding PDF/X-1a vs. PDF/X4
      3m 20s
    4. Understanding when to create an Acrobat layer
      1m 25s
    5. Using single pages vs. spreads
      2m 56s
  11. 2m 14s
    1. Final thoughts: 10 things to keep your printer happy
      2m 14s

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