InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets
Illustration by Don Barnett

Troubleshooting the nested range


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InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets

with Deke McClelland

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Video: Troubleshooting the nested range

In the previous exercise, we set the nested Character Style to encompass the first sentence of each one of the styled paragraphs. Now I am working inside of a catch-up document. If you are just joining us, it's called Sentence range.indd, it's found inside the 05_nested numbered folder. But if you are still working inside the original Pages 194-195.indd document, stick with it. Let's check out what we've wrought so far. Let's go ahead and take a look at the results of our modifications. I am going to go ahead and hide this Paragraph Styles palette, so we have a little more room on screen.
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  1. 45m 34s
    1. How style automation works and why every file needs it
      2m 26s
    2. Installing the DekeKeys shortcuts
      3m 58s
    3. Meet the Eyedropper tool
      2m 12s
    4. Using the "loaded" Eyedropper
      2m 23s
    5. Loading new attributes
      1m 33s
    6. Lifting some attributes (and not others)
      4m 18s
    7. Eyedropper FYIs
      4m 51s
    8. The five kinds of style sheets
      3m 17s
    9. Meet the paragraph style
      2m 45s
    10. Applying the Find/Change command
      3m 41s
    11. The style sheet domino effect
      4m 10s
    12. Meet the object style
      4m 18s
    13. Appending a paragraph style to an object style
      2m 5s
    14. The power of the local override
      3m 37s
  2. 29m 56s
    1. The most common and useful style sheet
      40s
    2. Creating a paragraph style
      3m 56s
    3. The Paragraph Style Options dialog box
      3m 55s
    4. Assigning a keypad shortcut
      3m 8s
    5. The better way to create a style
      1m 29s
    6. Basing one style on another
      3m 15s
    7. Assigning a Next Style setting
      2m 30s
    8. Creating a closed style loop
      1m 39s
    9. Using the Quick Apply function
      3m 29s
    10. Formatting an entire story in one click
      2m 43s
    11. Auto-formatting as you type
      3m 12s
  3. 20m 41s
    1. Style sheets are dynamic
      38s
    2. Changing the font for multiple style sheets
      4m 29s
    3. Updating a shared attribute
      2m 23s
    4. Type style, skew, and tracking
      4m 12s
    5. Clearing and integrating local overrides
      3m 5s
    6. Removing widows with Balance Ragged Lines
      2m 47s
    7. Additional tricks for clearing overrides
      3m 7s
  4. 35m 9s
    1. Styling words, numbers, and symbols
      1m 15s
    2. Organizing style sheets
      6m 14s
    3. Character styles protect overrides
      5m 21s
    4. Creating a character style
      3m 44s
    5. Prioritizing style sheet shortcuts
      5m 23s
    6. Applying your new character style
      2m 50s
    7. Updating two styles in one pass
      4m 23s
    8. When in doubt, be obsessive
      5m 59s
  5. 1h 17m
    1. Character styles on steroids
      1m 15s
    2. Repeating style elements
      3m 59s
    3. Establishing a nested style
      3m 32s
    4. Setting the range of a nested style
      4m 3s
    5. Troubleshooting the nested range
      6m 49s
    6. Assigning automatic numbers
      2m 13s
    7. Assigning automatic bullets
      4m 49s
    8. Starting and restarting numbered sequences
      4m 15s
    9. Nesting a number or bullet style
      4m 45s
    10. Setting precise guidelines
      6m 23s
    11. Right-aligning numbers
      7m 31s
    12. Center-aligning bullets
      4m 9s
    13. Auto-numbering figures
      3m 0s
    14. Creating a custom Number setting
      4m 18s
    15. Specifying a chapter number
      3m 9s
    16. Numbering across threaded frames
      4m 4s
    17. Using a "list" to number across stories
      4m 28s
    18. What you can and can't do
      4m 36s
  6. 53m 12s
    1. If you make tables, listen up
      1m 0s
    2. A tale of two tables: Introducing the document
      2m 15s
    3. Creating a cell style
      5m 8s
    4. Adjusting the Inset values
      3m 36s
    5. Formatting the body of a table
      4m 22s
    6. Creating and applying column styles
      5m 32s
    7. Creating an all-inclusive table style
      4m 42s
    8. Converting and styling a table
      4m 48s
    9. Fixing formatting errors
      4m 20s
    10. Fixing row height and column width
      5m 24s
    11. An argument for independent cell styles
      2m 33s
    12. Making a dependent cell style
      3m 25s
    13. Selectively applying a cell style
      6m 7s
  7. 1h 10m
    1. The convergence of very nearly everything
      1m 18s
    2. Updating a style from the Find Font command
      4m 23s
    3. Step, Repeat, and Distribute
      4m 57s
    4. Adding text; removing style
      3m 2s
    5. Object-level formatting attributes
      3m 48s
    6. Creating an object style
      3m 42s
    7. Creating paired paragraph styles
      6m 27s
    8. Nesting paired paragraph styles
      3m 8s
    9. Inline and above line graphics
      5m 18s
    10. Creating an anchored object
      6m 29s
    11. Viewing frames and threads
      3m 52s
    12. Creating an anchored object style
      3m 48s
    13. Establishing anchored object defaults
      3m 44s
    14. Problems? Fit the frame to the contents
      4m 35s
    15. Employing a highly selective object style
      5m 27s
    16. The best way to anchor objects
      2m 23s
    17. Moving and anchoring text and objects
      4m 4s
  8. 1m 7s
    1. Goodbye
      1m 7s

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Watch the Online Video Course InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets
5h 37m Intermediate Apr 04, 2008

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Like other page layout applications, InDesign allows users to control the appearance of every element on a page. It helps format elements with style sheets, which collect formatting attributes for easy replication. But that's where the similarities end. InDesign CS3 One-on-One: Style Sheets demonstrates why InDesign's style sheets are far more powerful than anything found in any other page layout program. Pioneering electronic publisher and author Deke McClelland goes to the heart of InDesign's style sheets, and discusses how they define and guide just about every other program feature. He covers how to format words, paragraphs, whole frames, objects, tables, and even entire stories with a single click. Exercise files accompany the course.

Download Deke's customized keyboard layouts for InDesign Style Sheets from the Exercise Files tab.

Topics include:
  • Replicating formatting attributes with the Eyedropper tool
  • Creating and applying paragraph styles
  • Formatting stories with New Style and Quick Apply
  • Understanding and exploiting local overrides
  • Augmenting text with character styles
  • Employing nested and numbered styles
  • Using a "list" to number across stories
  • Working with table and cell styles
  • Creating and employing object styles
  • Automating whole page designs with anchored object styles
Subject:
Design
Software:
InDesign
Author:
Deke McClelland

Troubleshooting the nested range

In the previous exercise, we set the nested Character Style to encompass the first sentence of each one of the styled paragraphs. Now I am working inside of a catch-up document. If you are just joining us, it's called Sentence range.indd, it's found inside the 05_nested numbered folder. But if you are still working inside the original Pages 194-195.indd document, stick with it. Let's check out what we've wrought so far. Let's go ahead and take a look at the results of our modifications. I am going to go ahead and hide this Paragraph Styles palette, so we have a little more room on screen.

You can see that the style works beautifully for the first couple of paragraphs with the exception, of course, of the missing number. Right now we are missing the number at the outset of the step, but we will take care of that in the future exercise, when we take a look at Auto Numbering. Otherwise, these first couple of paragraphs looks totally hunky-dory but the inset bullet items, they don't look right at all. Notice that the steps always begin with a very short sentence. So that Step Leader is a short sentence. It serves as a kind of miniature headline, whereas if I work with normal sentences like these right here at the outset of the bulleted items, the styling looks totally wrong. It looks ridiculous.

That's a function of the fact that we need to update those child styles, so the style that is associated with these paragraphs, I'll go ahead and double click in there and bring up the Paragraph Styles palette. The Step Bullet style is a child to the Step style, so it got edited along with. We are going to have to fix that in an upcoming exercise, but for now I am going to leave it alone. And then let's go ahead and go over to the right-hand side of the page. We have got a lot of problems here; we have got another bullet that's all messed up, these two bullets are horribly messed up.

This guy is okay; he is missing a number but otherwise he is alright, and then if we go down here, this is the problem we really are going to take care of inside of this exercise. Notice that we have got this item that says, 'Magnify the image,' and incidentally, this is the final paragraph on the right-hand page, on page 195. Notice that it says, 'Magnify the image,' and then it says ..., and then we have got, 'And examine it closely.' And that little ... there, which is known by the way as an ellipses, that indicates that there is more text to follow of course.

That ... is throwing off the Nested Style. Now had I used an ellipses character, that's actually a special character which you can get to on the Mac. I know that you can press Option+; on the Mac to get the ellipses character. I forget how you get it under Windows, but it doesn't matter because I am not going to use it. Basically, it's like this. That ... character, which would avoid this problem, spaces the periods too close to each other and basically it goes against the Chicago Manual of Style. And my editors are absolutely ironclad where that's concerned and they have lectured me up, down and sideways on why you have to have little bit of space between each one of the periods.

I just say, you know what, fine. If Chicago Manual of Style says this is the way it's got to be, this is the way it's going to be. But by virtue of the fact that we have got spaces and periods combined together that makes InDesign think that we have ended the sentence at this point and it goes ahead and ignores the 'and examine it closely' as well as the couple of our periods right there. If we want to take care of that we have got to change the Nested Style range. So what I am going to do is I am going to press the W key, which exits the Preview mode as you may know, and you can also by the way, you can go down to the little icon at the bottom of the tool box and you can switch from Preview to Normal right here if you prefer.

But I like to use that W keyboard shortcut; it's very easy to switch in, like so, and out of the Preview mode just by pressing W. Also, by the way, you go up to the Type menu and make sure that you can see the hidden character. So if the command at the end of the Type menu says, Hide Hidden Characters, that's good. If it says Show Hidden Characters, go ahead and choose it so that you can see the hidden characters by which I mean in this case the spaces right there. Now normal spaces appear as little dots, kind of tiny bullets, little blue bullets in our case.

That little number sign indicates the end of the story. But right there we have got a bullet with a little kind of a hat on it right there, a little overscore, and that tells us that that's an en space, which is a space that's half of the size of the type size. So in our case, our type size is set to 10.5 so this is a space that's about 5 1/4 points wide, so very, very narrow of course. However, it's wider than a standard space and it's also invariable, so it doesn't change to suit the justification of the paragraph.

It gives us a little extra space right after the Step Leader. It's also something that we can reference when we are building our Nested Style. So here's what I am going to do, and by the way if you want to take a look at all of the other, I'll go ahead and scroll up here- painfully slowly actually. Let's go ahead and see if we can move a little more quickly. I've got these en spaces at the end of each one of the Step Leaders. So this is very consistent formatting that is to say inside of this document, so we can advantage of it. I am going to go ahead and deselect my text, whether by pressing Ctrl+Shift+A or Command+Shift+A on the Mac, and then I am going to move my text over a little bit here, so that I can see it, when I have the gianormous Paragraph Style Options dialog box open.

I'll go to the Paragraph Styles palette, I'll double click on that Step Style there, move it over a little bit so we can see what we were doing. Make sure that Preview checkbox is on. I'll go down in Drop Caps and Nested Styles right there. Right now, I've got Step Leader through and including the first sentence inside of each one of these paragraphs. Let's go ahead and change it so that it's Up To since we are going up to a character inside of the paragraph. We will go up to the first occurrence of and we'll go ahead and change this option to an En Space right there.

So this time we are saying Step Leader up to the first en space. Now it hasn't changed anything onscreen; I need to click off once again and notice it goes ahead and updates that text and that is exactly what we want. I am going to go ahead and click OK. Now if I zoom out, you can see that that sentence is taken care of in that paragraph, in the last paragraph on the page, and the other step paragraphs are handled just beautifully; this guy is fine and we are ignoring the bullet items, by the way, which have turned totally blue italics on us now, because there are no en spaces inside the bullet items.

This guy is handled beautifully and this guy is handled beautifully as well. So all we care about is the steps and all we are getting is great results, where the steps are concerned. In the next exercise, we are going to assign numbers to each one of our steps using InDesign CS3's Auto Numbering feature.

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