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Using inline notes

From: Collaborative Workflows with InDesign and InCopy

Video: Using inline notes

So moving into the brave new world of InDesign and InCopy workflow you might find yourself missing some analog things like little sticky paper notes that you could have attach to proofs as they wind their way around the department. Well actually InDesign and InCopy have an electronic way of attaching a sticky note to a story and it's called, surprisingly enough, notes. So let me show you how you work with notes in InDesign. And all the notes that you add to your layout in InDesign can be read by the InCopy user and in fact this layout has some notes that the InCopy user added that we'll take a look at later on in the video.

Using inline notes

So moving into the brave new world of InDesign and InCopy workflow you might find yourself missing some analog things like little sticky paper notes that you could have attach to proofs as they wind their way around the department. Well actually InDesign and InCopy have an electronic way of attaching a sticky note to a story and it's called, surprisingly enough, notes. So let me show you how you work with notes in InDesign. And all the notes that you add to your layout in InDesign can be read by the InCopy user and in fact this layout has some notes that the InCopy user added that we'll take a look at later on in the video.

The Notes menu in CS5 is actually sort of hidden. You have to go under the Type menu and go down here to Notes. So it's right above Track Changes. And right now everything is grayed out because the only place that you can add a note is inside of a text frame with the Type tool. So we click with the Type tool inside of the text frame, let's say right after the word Shrub here, and then go to Type > Notes and it's still grayed out. Why? Because you have to check out the story first.

When you add a note to a story you are actually changing something inside the story and then of course you have to check it out if you ever want to edit a story, as you already know. So I'm going to right-click and choose InCopy > Check Out. And now let's go to the Type menu, go to Notes, and now we can add a note. There is this thing called Notes mode that really I don't know anybody ever uses. All you ever need to do is choose New Note. And in fact this is a really good command to assign the keyboard shortcut to since it doesn't have one. So choose New Note and then you don't have to go into and out of Notes mode.

What happens when you're in Layout View is that the Notes panel automatically opens up but bet you didn't know there was a Notes panel. By yes there is. It is hiding here in Window under Editorial right there. Remember we open the Assignments panel from the Editorial flyout, but there's where Notes is. So at this point you can just start typing your note. Like I might want to say Is there a better way to start off this section? I don't what kind of notes I might be given to the editors, telling them how to write the stories, but you know I could write a note if I wanted to.

The note will include who wrote the note, when I wrote it, and even how many words and characters are in there which is kind of crazy. I am going to close this panel to show you, I don't know if you can see, but I'm to zoom in here with Command+plus or Ctrl+Plus that the icon indicating that I left a note is this weird little "I Dream of Jeannie" kind of hourglass thing. It adds no white space to the story so you never have to worry about a note you know accidentally adding too much space inside running text.

And it won't print and it won't export to PDF so you don't see this icon anywhere else rather than in Layout view, in Normal view, in InDesign or InCopy. This tells you that somebody left a note and then icon is in their user color. To see the contents of the note there is many ways to get their the easiest is to hover your type cursor over the top half of the note, won't work over the bottom half, I don't know why, but over the top half of the note it turned into a pointing finger and the tooltip tells you all about the note. The contents of the note, who wrote it. Or you can just click and then the notes panel opens up and tells you.

Another way to tell where the note is, is to click somewhere in the story and then in the Type menu go to Notes and choose Next Note. And the cursor will automatically jump to the note icon and open up the Notes panel. I think it's a lot easier though in many cases to see a note in Story Editor. So I'm going to close the Notes panel and zoom out with Ctrl+0 to fit the page in the Window or Command+0 are on a Mac.

With my cursor blinking here I can go to the Edit menu and choose Edit in Story Editor or press Command+Y or Ctrl+Y. And in this view the note appears inline in this little frame. This is exactly how it appears in InCopy in the Story view or Galley view and I talk about using notes InCopy in a different video. Now, when you are in this view, as long as you have checked out the story you can go ahead and add notes if you'd like. So I'm going to click right here. And this time I am going to right- click and choose New Note right from the right-click menu. I am a big fan of right-clicking.

And there is my empty frame with my cursor blinking inside it and I'm going to say, "20 feet? Are you sure?" Commenting on the previous sentence. When you are in this view in Story Editor view you can click on either side of these Note icons to expand or collapse them. There are also commands inside the Notes flyout menu to expand or collapse the Notes in the Story and notice this is fast way to remove the notes in the story. People ask me that all the time.

If you want to remove an individual note all you need to do is click to the right or to the left of its frame and press the Delete or forward Delete key, just like any other character. So be careful if you do that by accident. I am going to Undo to bring it back. Now, you cannot print out notes from InDesign. You can from InCopy. So if you have some notes in here and you need a record of them, you have to ask your InCopy colleague do that for you. And what happens when you open up a document and you're wondering, gee, I wonder if the InCopy user left any notes? Do you have to open every individual story and look at it in Story Editor mode? Do you have to zoom in really closely to look for icons in their user color? Yes and yes.

No, I'm kidding. Now you don't have to do either one. Actually the fastest way to find to see if there is a note is to go to the Type menu, go to Notes and here is the tip. If Previous and Next Note are black, they are not dimmed, that means that there was a note somewhere in this document. If there are no notes in this document these will both be dimmed. So what I usually do is when I open up a file, if I suspect there might be notes, or my editor tells me I've left a couple of notes in there for you. I'll immediately go here and choose Next Note. What happens is that InDesign jumps to the very first note and shows me the contents.

Now, this is not really that useful because I don't know where this note is, right? If I try to zoom in with Command+Plus or Ctrl+Plus, nothing happens because my cursor is blinking inside the note. What I want is for InDesign to put the cursor at the note icon in the story. And that's what this handy little button is for, Go to Note Anchor. So click that and you have to trust that it is blinking next to the anchor, but now if you press Command+Plus or Ctrl+ Plus, it will zoom in right on the note anchor. Ta-da! All right, and at the bottom of the Notes panel we have Go to Next Note and Go to Previous Note.

So this is the fast way to quickly jump through the document, ah, there is a note anchor, and see where all the notes are. One question that a lot of users have is what happens if we want to add a note not to a text frame, but say to a picture or something like that? Well unfortunately there really are no solutions for that in the InDesign and InCopy workflow. There are couple of notes plug-ins available, third-party plug-ins, but even those don't let you do that. The one tip that I would have for that is-- Let me zoom out to Fit Page in Window. Let's just close out of here and press Command+0 or Ctrl+0-- is to put a big fat text frame in the pasteboard in InDesign and then export this empty frame to InCopy format and then that way people can check this out and write notes to each other in the pasteboard.

So it's a sneaky little thing called pasteboard notes. But otherwise the built-in notes feature is pretty handy and it's nice to be able to be able to add notes exactly in the text where you want that comment to appear, but not have it hurt to the printout or the PDF at all.

Show transcript

This video is part of

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  1. 3m 57s
    1. Welcome
      1m 25s
    2. Using the exercise files
      2m 32s
  2. 25m 58s
    1. Overview of this course
      3m 2s
    2. Understanding the parallel workflow
      6m 54s
    3. Rewards and challenges in the new workflow
      9m 3s
    4. Requirements and recommendations
      6m 59s
  3. 32m 52s
    1. Setting up projects and users
      3m 32s
    2. Understanding stories and frames
      7m 1s
    3. Making stories editable for InCopy from InDesign
      7m 25s
    4. Editing workflow stories in InCopy
      7m 32s
    5. Checking stories in and out
      4m 48s
    6. Completing a project in InDesign
      2m 34s
  4. 32m 34s
    1. Three main views of a file
      8m 37s
    2. Becoming familiar with default panels
      6m 4s
    3. Customizing the interface
      9m 4s
    4. Navigating stories and views
      8m 49s
  5. 43m 18s
    1. Working with the Assignments panel
      5m 15s
    2. Editing in Layout view
      8m 44s
    3. Editing in Story or Galley view
      10m 49s
    4. Copyfitting text
      5m 49s
    5. Inserting special characters
      6m 39s
    6. Importing text
      3m 34s
    7. Working with read-only layouts
      2m 28s
  6. 32m 6s
    1. Applying styles for copyfit
      7m 37s
    2. Applying local character formatting
      6m 53s
    3. Applying local paragraph formatting
      7m 10s
    4. Splitting and spanning columns
      5m 7s
    5. Using the Eyedropper tool to copy/paste formatting
      5m 19s
  7. 40m 27s
    1. Checking spelling
      4m 51s
    2. Using the language dictionaries
      3m 23s
    3. Using the thesaurus
      1m 46s
    4. Using Find/Change
      10m 34s
    5. Working with the Autocorrect feature
      2m 59s
    6. Building text macros
      4m 55s
    7. Using inline notes
      6m 22s
    8. Working with built-in scripts
      5m 37s
  8. 25m 36s
    1. Adding footnotes
      2m 22s
    2. Using conditional text
      6m 16s
    3. Creating hyperlinks
      3m 33s
    4. Inserting cross-references
      7m 29s
    5. Working with tables
      5m 56s
  9. 14m 25s
    1. Setting up and using Track Changes
      6m 4s
    2. Customizing the markup
      4m 7s
    3. Accepting and rejecting changes
      4m 14s
  10. 27m 30s
    1. Using the Position tool
      5m 14s
    2. Using the Object menu
      5m 58s
    3. Importing and replacing images
      6m 36s
    4. Inserting images into the story
      5m 22s
    5. Using Mini Bridge and Bridge
      4m 20s
  11. 25m 45s
    1. Creating new InCopy documents
      6m 54s
    2. Creating InCopy templates
      6m 10s
    3. Opening linked InCopy stories directly
      3m 20s
    4. Opening Word files in InCopy
      2m 59s
    5. Placing Buzzword files in InCopy
      6m 22s
  12. 23m 37s
    1. Exporting stories to Word, RTF, and Buzzword
      5m 2s
    2. Exporting layouts to PDF
      4m 36s
    3. Exporting galleys and stories to PDF
      7m 11s
    4. Printing from InCopy
      6m 48s
  13. 48m 17s
    1. Exporting stories from the layout
      10m 2s
    2. Working with the Assignments panel in InDesign
      7m 8s
    3. Editing and updating files
      7m 37s
    4. Using inline notes
      7m 39s
    5. Workflow features in the Links panel
      6m 0s
    6. Placing new InCopy files
      4m 15s
    7. Closing out of a project
      5m 36s
  14. 23m 29s
    1. Layout workflow overview
      8m 11s
    2. Updating stories and designs
      11m 38s
    3. Tips for successful layout workflows
      3m 40s
  15. 27m 16s
    1. Creating assignments in InDesign
      12m 19s
    2. Working with assignments in InCopy
      5m 22s
    3. Keeping layout files local
      2m 42s
    4. Solving common assignment issues
      6m 53s
  16. 19m 0s
    1. Creating assignment packages in InDesign
      4m 42s
    2. Working with assignment packages in InCopy
      5m 20s
    3. Keeping packages up to date
      2m 33s
    4. Using DropBox with an InCopy workflow
      6m 25s
  17. 4m 27s
    1. Community help and resources
      4m 11s
    2. Goodbye
      16s

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