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Fine-tuning the selected design

From: Designing a Logo

Video: Fine-tuning the selected design

Okay the results are in. My client has got back to me and she wants this one. Now we are still undecided about exactly where the type is going to be juxtaposed next to the image. I said to her I want to refine it a little bit more. I'm not entirely sold on the shapes that we have here. We both liked the concept and we are leaning towards this orientation with the hard edge on the left. Round three now begins. The first thing I want to do is when I originally made this shape, I made it rather hurriedly. It was inspired by a photograph and let's take a look at that photograph. I have got the source image right there and that's just the detail of the photograph that I was using as my inspiration for this. I made the original with a rectangle; then I had made one of the ends pointed and then reflected various copies of that around the center point and then duplicated that overlapped the two.

Fine-tuning the selected design

Okay the results are in. My client has got back to me and she wants this one. Now we are still undecided about exactly where the type is going to be juxtaposed next to the image. I said to her I want to refine it a little bit more. I'm not entirely sold on the shapes that we have here. We both liked the concept and we are leaning towards this orientation with the hard edge on the left. Round three now begins. The first thing I want to do is when I originally made this shape, I made it rather hurriedly. It was inspired by a photograph and let's take a look at that photograph. I have got the source image right there and that's just the detail of the photograph that I was using as my inspiration for this. I made the original with a rectangle; then I had made one of the ends pointed and then reflected various copies of that around the center point and then duplicated that overlapped the two.

It's looking a bit uniform and I thought what I would like to do is just mix it up a bit, make it look a little bit more plant like, a little bit less uniform. So how I did this was I placed the image and we saw that when I was tracing the rose in an earlier video and I just traced over the shapes and essentially used the same approach as I did here; reflecting or rather rotating copies. But then just adjusting the copies, so they are not all quite exactly the same.

Another approach that I tried, it came off a little bit but just to use the Warp tool and now if I use the Warp tool you can see what I mean, I can just bend these around a little bit. So that's something else that you might want to experiment with; having refined this to this state, you may see on your screens there is a little ghosting of the rectangle edge down at the bottom there, where my cursor is. I assure you that isn't actually there and if I zoom in nice and big we see that it goes away. That's just a screen anomaly.

So the next thing I need to decide is what am I going to do with the type; the next thing I need to decide is where am I going to put the type relative to the image and that's what I'm experimenting within in this particular version. So beginning up here, we are really getting into the fine tuning at this point, is the type going to go at the bottom, is it going to go at the top and then some live breaking news, my client wants to change the tagline. So it's no longer garden design & planting, it's now planting & design. So that kind of changes things a little bit.

I'm noticing with, there are two lines of lowercase text, the spacing between those two lines is looking a little bit odd to me and that's just because of the shapes of the characters. So I thought what I'll do is I'll put the tagline in all caps, so I'm leaning towards this now. But in these versions here, versions 5 and 6 my reservations here are the combination of the image and the type create an overall shape that's a little bit too big. I think I want something a little bit more contained and for that reason I'm now looking at putting the type either on the top or on the bottom and I'm going to go with it on the bottom.

For the type what I have done is, I have made sure that their width of the tagline is exactly the same as the widths of the company name and I did that just by turning on some guides, which I'll create a couple of guides. There is a guide right there and another guide right there and then I just selected this piece of type and holding down the Shift key, dragged it out to that guide so that its exactly of the width of the line of type above.

So the next decision we want to make is what color we are using. So far I just been using a fairly generic green chosen from the Swatches panel but we want to specify a specific Pantone color, a spot color. By spot color, I mean a color reference by number and chosen from a color matching system and the most commonly used color matching system is the Pantone system. So here I have chosen three different versions Pantone 369 the lighter green, 354 the more forestry green and then the 349, which is the very dark green. To choose these Pantone colors we need to do that using the Swatches panel and come to the Swatches Library menu where I click and come down to Color Books and the one I want is Pantone Solid Uncoated. I'm choosing uncoated because this is going to be printed on uncoated stock for a business cards. So there is my Swatches panel right there and if I don't see this Find field then I can just make sure that is ticked right there.

If I type in my numbers, it would jump to that number. If I select the items I want to apply the color to, click on the color, the color thereafter appears in my Swatches panel and it's distinguished in my Swatches panel by having this triangle and a dot in the bottom right- hand corner. So I send these versions off to my client, I wait, she gets back to me and she says "I like the first one." Which I find a little surprising but she is the client so we are going to go with the first one, the Pantone 369.

My next step is to create a few different versions of the logo then we are going to evaluate the logo according to the criteria that we set up at the beginning of this series of videos. So here are my finished logos, I have got five different versions of little more or less the same but let's look at how they differ. So I have what I'm calling the Regular version that's the one we have been seeing up until now. I have the Boxed version and this is for use and I could go into how they should be used in the usage guidelines which is coming up in a couple of movies time.

The Boxed version just has a half point role around the elements and this is for when the logo is going to be used in conjunction with lots of other elements on the page, just to isolate it so that our logo doesn't look crowded in by any other elements that may be adjacent to it. Then down here, I have what I'm calling the Bleed version. Now when I started experimenting with the logo in the context of a business card, I felt that it works best or maybe it works best, I'm still undecided about that. Bleeding of the edge here on the left and the bottom, so for the Bleed version I'm repositioning the type at the top of the image and I'm extending the image itself by 3 millimeters or one-eight of an inch on the left and on the bottom.

The Reversed version is for use on a solid color background, bear in mind that what we see here is the reversed version on our background but when we come to prepare the file I'm going to be deleting that green background, I need to show it here because otherwise our white on white is not going to show up and then finally we have a Black & White version for use when we are printing in only one color ink. Then at the bottom of the page I have just quickly knocked up the logo in the context of a business card and I'm defining the bounds of the business card by this rectangle, that's three and a half inches by two inches.

Of course when we actually come to do the business card for real, I would make sure that that stroked box is not really there. Finally I would just like to revisit those criteria that we started with at the beginning of this series of videos. So I'm going to come to my Layers panel and turn on Layer 1. We said at the beginning that a good logo has a strong uncluttered image comprised of only the most essential elements. I think that's true, uses imagery that's appropriate for your type of business, definitely, compliments your company name, absolutely. Uses a readable font that does not compete with the logo symbol, yes and you will notice that I have done in fact to using the type all in black with spaces between deep and green. Whereas originally I was thinking that I would have it be a logo element where I differentiated the words by color and no space.

But I feel that the color in the image itself is enough color so I don't want to compete with the logo and for that reason the type is all now in black. And looks good in black and white as well as in color. Yes, I think so. Perhaps I'm being over generous here but I'm going to give myself five out of five on this. I hope that you got a similar score on your logo and of course bear in mind, it is very subjective. All right, next we are going to look at preparing the digital files.

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Designing a Logo

31 video lessons · 58038 viewers

Nigel French
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