Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

HTML5 First Look
Illustration by

New structural tags


From:

HTML5 First Look

with James Williamson

Video: New structural tags

HTML 4 provided us with a number of tags that helped to give our content meaning. However, other than the heading elements, none of the elements in HTML 4 helped to define a document's structure. Although it is a common practice to use a div element to section content and identify it through a class or ID attribute, in reality, this adds no additional meaning to your page structure at all. To help give authors more control over the structure of their HTML documents, HTML5 introduces several new structural tags to help identify and section content.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 3m 56s
    1. Welcome
      1m 1s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 50s
    3. Who is this course for?
      1m 5s
  2. 21m 12s
    1. Exploring prior standards
      4m 26s
    2. Why do we need HTML5?
      3m 32s
    3. HTML5 timeline
      4m 24s
    4. Current HTML5 support
      4m 25s
    5. What HTML5 is (and what it isn't)
      4m 25s
  3. 27m 49s
    1. HTML5 vs. HTML4
      3m 25s
    2. New structural tags
      6m 1s
    3. New content tags
      4m 7s
    4. New application-focused tags
      5m 32s
    5. Deprecated elements
      4m 28s
    6. API overview
      4m 16s
  4. 22m 29s
    1. Content models
      5m 33s
    2. Understanding the outline algorithm
      3m 21s
    3. The role of ‹div› tags
      4m 20s
    4. Using ID and class attributes
      2m 6s
    5. DOCTYPE declarations
      4m 16s
    6. Character encoding
      2m 53s
  5. 41m 27s
    1. Basic page structure
      3m 40s
    2. Structuring top-level elements
      7m 30s
    3. Structuring interior content
      8m 42s
    4. Building headers
      9m 11s
    5. Checking document outlines
      5m 46s
    6. Ensuring cross-browser structure
      6m 38s
  6. 27m 53s
    1. New input types
      5m 57s
    2. Setting form autofocus
      2m 53s
    3. Using placeholder data
      4m 4s
    4. Marking required fields
      3m 24s
    5. Working with number inputs
      5m 49s
    6. Using date pickers
      5m 46s
  7. 1h 1m
    1. Canvas overview
      6m 21s
    2. Adding canvas content
      8m 58s
    3. Drawing in the canvas environment
      12m 9s
    4. Drag-and-drop API overview
      6m 18s
    5. Offline applications overview
      7m 11s
    6. Video overview
      5m 45s
    7. Encoding video
      8m 23s
    8. Adding video
      5m 58s
  8. 57m 33s
    1. Geolocation API overview
      5m 50s
    2. Web storage API overview
      5m 40s
    3. WebSockets overview
      4m 16s
    4. CSS3 overview
      6m 38s
    5. Enhancing typography with CSS3
      7m 42s
    6. Using @font-face
      7m 11s
    7. Styling HTML5 with CSS3
      10m 23s
    8. Using CSS3 transitions
      9m 53s
  9. 5m 6s
    1. Final thoughts
      3m 49s
    2. Goodbye
      1m 17s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
HTML5 First Look
4h 28m Beginner Aug 23, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In HTML5 First Look, author James Williamson introduces the newest HTML specification, providing a high-level overview of HTML5 in its current state, how it differs from HTML 4, the current level of support in various browsers and mobile devices, and how the specification might evolve in the future. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Understanding the history of HTML5
  • Using new tags
  • Understanding HTML5 semantics
  • Coding ID and class attributes in HTML5
  • Structuring documents
  • Building forms
  • Exploring HTML5 native APIs
  • Encoding and adding HTML5 video
  • Exploring associated technologies such as CSS3
Subjects:
Developer Web Web Design Web Development
Software:
HTML
Author:
James Williamson

New structural tags

HTML 4 provided us with a number of tags that helped to give our content meaning. However, other than the heading elements, none of the elements in HTML 4 helped to define a document's structure. Although it is a common practice to use a div element to section content and identify it through a class or ID attribute, in reality, this adds no additional meaning to your page structure at all. To help give authors more control over the structure of their HTML documents, HTML5 introduces several new structural tags to help identify and section content.

In many places, these tags will allow you to replace container div tags with meaningful semantic markup. In this movie, I want to take a moment to introduce you to these tags and give you a brief introduction regarding their use. We'll start with the section element. According to the HTML5 specification, the section element represents a generic section of a document or application. A section, in this context, is a thematic grouping of content, typically with a heading. Note the emphasis on the grouping of thematic content and the typical need for a heading.

Sections could be chapters, introductions, product descriptions, or any other distinct section of content. I've seen plenty of demos where the section tag is used as simply a replacement for the div tag. Well, that's not always correct. If you need a container tag to specifically assist with styling or scripting, use the div tag. Sections should be distinct regions with distinct titles within your document. Now, look at it this way. If you were creating an outline of your document, any element identified as a section would be listed as a bullet point in that outline.

That's a great way to help determine whether content belongs in a section or not. Next up, I want to talk about the article element. There seems to be a great deal of confusion about the section and article tags, so let's take a look at what the specification has to say about articles. The article element represents a self- contained composition in a document, page, application, or site and that is intended to be independently distributable or reusable, e.g. in syndication. This could be a forum post, a magazine or newspaper article, a blog entry, a user-submitted comment, an interactive widget or gadget, or any other independent item of content.

The point of emphasis here is on the independent nature of the content. If the content can be syndicated through a feed or republished on its own, an article tag is warranted. The aside element represents a section of a page that consists of content that is tangentially related to the content around the aside element, and which could be considered separate from that content. Such sections are often represented as sidebars in printed typography. The biggest concern with the aside tag is the location in which it is used.

It should be nested within the section of content that it relates to. An aside located at the top level of the document would relate to the entire page, whereas an aside within an article itself should relate to that article's content. Asides are perfect for pull quotes, adds, related navigational groupings, or yes, even sidebar content. The header element, while not by definition a sectional tag, can assist greatly with the structure of your sites. The specification defines the header element as follows.

The header element represents a group of introductory or navigational aids. A header element is intended to usually contain the section's heading,an h1-h6 element or an hgroup elemen, t but that is not required. The header element can also be used to wrap a section's table of contents, a search form, or any relevant logos. Headers and sections go hand-in-hand. Although not required, a document can contain multiple headers. You might use one header to identify the overall page content and then use another heading within each new section or article.

The hgroup element is related to the header element, but is not reliant on the header element for its functionality. According to the specification, the hgroup element represents the heading of a section. The element is used to group a set of h1-h6 elements when the heading tag has multiple levels, such as subheadings, alternate titles, or taglines. If you place any heading tag, h1-h6, at the top of the section, the HTML5 specification states that the content is used as a heading for that section. However, if you have taglines, subheadings, or subtitles, the hgroup element can group those elements together, so that they are identified as relating to each other, instead of acting as individual headings for separate sections.

The footer element allows you to create footers for content sections. Like the header element, a page can contain multiple footers if sections within the page require them. The specification for the footer element has this to say. The footer element represents a footer for its nearest ancestor sectioning content or sectioning root element. A footer typically contains information about its section such as who wrote it, links to related documents, copyright data, and the like. Now, that's actually pretty straightforward if you think about it. The final new structural element is the nav element.

The specification's definition reads, "The nav element represents a section of a page that links to other pages or to parts within the page: a section with navigation links." The specification goes on to discuss two very important points on the use of the nav element. First, the nav element is only to be used for major navigational blocks within your content. It's not designed to wrap every grouping of links. Second, the specification also intends for the nav element to be used by assistive technology in determining when navigation should be skipped or immediately available for user agents like screen readers.

These new elements will help add structure and meaning to your markup. Later in this title, we'll examine each of these new elements in more detail and discuss the outline algorithm that drives how to properly structure pages with these new tags.

There are currently no FAQs about HTML5 First Look.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed HTML5 First Look.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.