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Up and Running with HTML
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Lab: Creating Links


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Up and Running with HTML

with James Williamson

Video: Lab: Creating Links

In this lab, we'll put all that we've learned about links to the test. Now, once again, we're going to be working on our Up and Running with HTML reference site, this time focusing on the site's navigation and all of the internal links. So, let's take a closer look at it. Now, at first glance, you might say "oh man, another one of these," but don't worry; it's not quite as long or as quite as involved as the previous lab. We will be working on all the files in the site, but we don't have quite as much to do in this one. So I have the lab_instructions.txt file opened up. You can find this one in 04_05, and then of course we've opened up all the HTML files.
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  1. 2m 12s
    1. Welcome
      55s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 17s
  2. 29m 30s
    1. Learning HTML
      2m 47s
    2. Choosing a code editor
      5m 2s
    3. Exploring basic HTML syntax
      8m 18s
    4. Do I need to learn HTML5?
      5m 6s
    5. Exploring HTML references
      8m 17s
  3. 35m 40s
    1. Exploring an HTML document
      5m 19s
    2. Working with doctype declarations
      4m 3s
    3. Examining the document head
      8m 20s
    4. Looking at the document body
      3m 21s
    5. Adding document structure
      8m 52s
    6. Lab: Coding a basic page
      3m 9s
    7. Solution: Coding a basic page
      2m 36s
  4. 1h 23m
    1. How does HTML format text?
      5m 51s
    2. Adding headings
      7m 24s
    3. Formatting paragraphs
      4m 54s
    4. Controlling line breaks
      3m 50s
    5. Creating lists
      10m 37s
    6. Emphasizing text
      6m 42s
    7. Displaying special characters
      5m 8s
    8. Controlling whitespace
      4m 35s
    9. Inserting images
      9m 20s
    10. Lab: Controlling page content
      13m 57s
    11. Solution: Controlling page content
      10m 55s
  5. 31m 54s
    1. Linking to pages within your site
      6m 45s
    2. Linking to external pages
      3m 2s
    3. Linking to downloadable resources
      2m 25s
    4. Linking to page regions
      8m 0s
    5. Lab: Creating Links
      5m 57s
    6. Solution: Creating Links
      5m 45s
  6. 40m 27s
    1. Examining basic table structure
      5m 10s
    2. Adding content to tables
      6m 20s
    3. Setting table attributes
      7m 42s
    4. Adding table captions
      4m 3s
    5. Defining table headers
      2m 13s
    6. Making table data accessible
      5m 46s
    7. Lab: Building tables
      4m 13s
    8. Solution: Building tables
      5m 0s
  7. 43m 23s
    1. Understanding the relationship between HTML and CSS
      4m 58s
    2. Creating inline styles
      4m 53s
    3. Exploring the style element
      5m 13s
    4. Basic font styling
      9m 24s
    5. Changing color
      4m 55s
    6. Taking styles further
      5m 24s
    7. Lab: Controlling basic styles
      5m 10s
    8. Solution: Controlling basic styles
      3m 26s
  8. 5m 44s
    1. Next steps
      2m 56s
    2. Additional resources
      2m 48s

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Up and Running with HTML
4h 32m Beginner Oct 19, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course is designed to quickly lead you through the steps of building an HTML website, from creating a new page to building links and tables. Author James Williamson simplifies the coding process, with straightforward steps you can recreate on your own. The course explains the basic structure of an HTML document, shows how to add text and images, and introduces font styling with CSS. James also offers a bonus design challenge at the end of each chapter, where he asks you to think of a solution before offering his own.

Topics include:
  • Choosing a code editor
  • Coding a basic page
  • Adding headings
  • Formatting paragraphs
  • Creating lists
  • Inserting images
  • Linking to internal and external pages
  • Linking to downloadable content
  • Building tables with headers and captions
  • Creating inline CSS styles
  • Changing the color and font of your text
Subjects:
Web Web Design Web Development
Software:
HTML
Author:
James Williamson

Lab: Creating Links

In this lab, we'll put all that we've learned about links to the test. Now, once again, we're going to be working on our Up and Running with HTML reference site, this time focusing on the site's navigation and all of the internal links. So, let's take a closer look at it. Now, at first glance, you might say "oh man, another one of these," but don't worry; it's not quite as long or as quite as involved as the previous lab. We will be working on all the files in the site, but we don't have quite as much to do in this one. So I have the lab_instructions.txt file opened up. You can find this one in 04_05, and then of course we've opened up all the HTML files.

We don't need the CSS file opened, just the HTM files. Okay, so step number one is to build page navigation. Now, this is going to apply to all of the pages, so go ahead and open all them up. So our instructions are "Using document-relative links," so in other words that's links relative to the documents inside the site, "enhance the list at the top of the document so that it links to the appropriate pages in the reference site." Be sure to add meaningful descriptions to each link. Okay, so what does that mean? Well, if you look in each one of these HTML files, at the very, very top of the page--or at least towards the top of the content--we have this list and then you'll find it in every single page.

And of course this is a menu. Now, lists are fantastic ways to structure menus, and it's overwhelmingly the most common way on the web to structure a menu, is to use this type of an unordered list. So here we have the Introduction to HTML, which is the page we are on; and we have HTML syntax, which is the syntax page; Creating links, which is this links.htm page; HTML reference, which is the reference.htm; and then Next steps, which of course is next. So you have to link each one of these items in this list to these pages, and you're going to need to do it for every single one of these documents.

It's not that difficult and once you do it on one page, you should be able to handle the rest of them pretty easily. Remember that in an addition to the link, you want to pass along descriptive text that talks about that link a little bit and describes it in just a really concise fashion; it doesn't have to be a lot of detail. You want to keep that to one sentence at least. Okay, now going back into our lab_instructions, we are also going to be linking to external sites. Now, for this one, we only have to work on one file and that will be the links.htm. Okay, so we are basically focusing on the footer of the page.

In the footer, locate the first reference to lynda.com. Create a link that links that text to the actual lynda.com site. So we're going to be using an absolute link here to link to an external page. Modify the link so that the site opens in a new tab or window, so we're going to have to pass more information to this particular link to make it open up in either a new tab or a new window. Then we have to remember to add descriptive text for that link. Now before we go onto the next step, I want to show you what I am talking about here. If I go over to the links.htm and I scroll all the way down to the code--let me turn my Word Wrap on, just to make it a little bit easier to read.

I'll go all the way down into the code. Towards the bottom of the page, I can find our footer right down here. And you can see here we have copyright lynda.com, follow me and lynda.com on Twitter. So it's the first reference to lynda.com that we want to make the link to, and if we look at that within the browser, you can see the other pages already have the link there. So don't go and cheat; focus on this one and see if you can figure out exactly how we're going to resolve that. All right! Now we still have a couple of more things we want to do down here in this footer. I'll go back to instructions in just a moment, but what we're going to do is these two little twitter handles--@jameswillweb, which is mine, and the @lynda.com one, which is the lynda.com one--what you will need to do is browse out to Twitter and find the lynda.com profile page and you want to use that URL as a link that people can click on to go to lynda.com and follow the lynda.com feed on Twitter. So you'll need to add that right down here as well.

So that's our last instruction on number two, which is to browse to Twitter, find the profile page, and then add a link to the follow us on Twitter text for lynda.com. Finally, we have one last task, which is going to be to use fragment identifiers. It's under the step number 3, Link to internal sections. So we're going to be working on two files here: the reference.htm and syntax.htm. Let me show you what we are going to be doing here. I am going to jump back into the browser. And the reference page, if you scroll down to reference page, at the very bottom is this Common Named Character Entities table.

What you're going to need to do is instead of making somebody scroll all the way through the glossary to get to that, right up here we have a line that says, "you'll find a quick reference to common HTML terms and a table of frequently used named character entities." I would like you to take the named character entities, make that clickable so that it would jump them down the page to this table. So that's actually going to require a couple of steps, and you're going to have to modify code in more than one location, so keep that in mind. If we look at that within the code, if I go to the reference page, you can see--once again let me turn Word Wrap on. Here we go.

You will see, here is the paragraph that we need to create the link in and then if we scroll down to where the table is, here is the table that we need to jump down to. So you'll need to do a little bit of work on both of those sections in order to make that happen. Now, the last thing that I want you to do is if you go into the syntax page, syntax.htm-- again, let me show you this visually first-- down towards the very bottom of this page-- as a matter of fact, the very last sentence-- that says, "You can also find a useful list of character entities on the HTML Reference page, and a more comprehensive list on Wikipedia." Well, we have a link here going to Wikipedia, so I would love to have a link here that not only takes you to the reference page, but jumps you directly to that table.

Again, if we go back into our code and we go to our syntax page, if I scroll all the way down towards the bottom, just above the footer, we'll go ahead and find that in our code as well. So that's where you want to focus. Keep in mind that as you work, if you get stuck, you can always go back and watch the previous movies in the chapter over if you need a little bit of a hint in terms of the syntax that we are using, or you can open the files in the finished_files folder for a really quick hint. And when you are done, don't forget to watch the solutions movie and compare your resultsto mine.

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