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Up and Running with HTML
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Do I need to learn HTML5?


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Up and Running with HTML

with James Williamson

Video: Do I need to learn HTML5?

By now, if you've paid any attention at all to web design, you've probably heard of HTML5. That's because there's so much hype surrounding it that it's really hard to get a clear picture of what exactly HTML5 is and how it impacts the process of learning web design. And because of this, you might be a little bit confused as to the best route to take when learning HTML, and where you should start. The best way to clear that up is to take a brief look at the history of HTML and where it stands today. You can trace the HTML's history way back to 1991, when Tim Berners-Lee published a document called "HTML Tags." This document described a set of tags that can be used to mark up the content of online documents.
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  1. 2m 12s
    1. Welcome
      55s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 17s
  2. 29m 30s
    1. Learning HTML
      2m 47s
    2. Choosing a code editor
      5m 2s
    3. Exploring basic HTML syntax
      8m 18s
    4. Do I need to learn HTML5?
      5m 6s
    5. Exploring HTML references
      8m 17s
  3. 35m 40s
    1. Exploring an HTML document
      5m 19s
    2. Working with doctype declarations
      4m 3s
    3. Examining the document head
      8m 20s
    4. Looking at the document body
      3m 21s
    5. Adding document structure
      8m 52s
    6. Lab: Coding a basic page
      3m 9s
    7. Solution: Coding a basic page
      2m 36s
  4. 1h 23m
    1. How does HTML format text?
      5m 51s
    2. Adding headings
      7m 24s
    3. Formatting paragraphs
      4m 54s
    4. Controlling line breaks
      3m 50s
    5. Creating lists
      10m 37s
    6. Emphasizing text
      6m 42s
    7. Displaying special characters
      5m 8s
    8. Controlling whitespace
      4m 35s
    9. Inserting images
      9m 20s
    10. Lab: Controlling page content
      13m 57s
    11. Solution: Controlling page content
      10m 55s
  5. 31m 54s
    1. Linking to pages within your site
      6m 45s
    2. Linking to external pages
      3m 2s
    3. Linking to downloadable resources
      2m 25s
    4. Linking to page regions
      8m 0s
    5. Lab: Creating Links
      5m 57s
    6. Solution: Creating Links
      5m 45s
  6. 40m 27s
    1. Examining basic table structure
      5m 10s
    2. Adding content to tables
      6m 20s
    3. Setting table attributes
      7m 42s
    4. Adding table captions
      4m 3s
    5. Defining table headers
      2m 13s
    6. Making table data accessible
      5m 46s
    7. Lab: Building tables
      4m 13s
    8. Solution: Building tables
      5m 0s
  7. 43m 23s
    1. Understanding the relationship between HTML and CSS
      4m 58s
    2. Creating inline styles
      4m 53s
    3. Exploring the style element
      5m 13s
    4. Basic font styling
      9m 24s
    5. Changing color
      4m 55s
    6. Taking styles further
      5m 24s
    7. Lab: Controlling basic styles
      5m 10s
    8. Solution: Controlling basic styles
      3m 26s
  8. 5m 44s
    1. Next steps
      2m 56s
    2. Additional resources
      2m 48s

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Up and Running with HTML
4h 32m Beginner Oct 19, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course is designed to quickly lead you through the steps of building an HTML website, from creating a new page to building links and tables. Author James Williamson simplifies the coding process, with straightforward steps you can recreate on your own. The course explains the basic structure of an HTML document, shows how to add text and images, and introduces font styling with CSS. James also offers a bonus design challenge at the end of each chapter, where he asks you to think of a solution before offering his own.

Topics include:
  • Choosing a code editor
  • Coding a basic page
  • Adding headings
  • Formatting paragraphs
  • Creating lists
  • Inserting images
  • Linking to internal and external pages
  • Linking to downloadable content
  • Building tables with headers and captions
  • Creating inline CSS styles
  • Changing the color and font of your text
Subjects:
Web Web Design Web Development
Software:
HTML
Author:
James Williamson

Do I need to learn HTML5?

By now, if you've paid any attention at all to web design, you've probably heard of HTML5. That's because there's so much hype surrounding it that it's really hard to get a clear picture of what exactly HTML5 is and how it impacts the process of learning web design. And because of this, you might be a little bit confused as to the best route to take when learning HTML, and where you should start. The best way to clear that up is to take a brief look at the history of HTML and where it stands today. You can trace the HTML's history way back to 1991, when Tim Berners-Lee published a document called "HTML Tags." This document described a set of tags that can be used to mark up the content of online documents.

This eventually led to the publication of the very first HTML specification: HTML 2.0 in 1995. HTML 3.2 then followed in 1997, only to be replaced by HTML 4.0 later the same year. Now the early days of HTML largely mirrored the Internet itself as the specifications matured right alongside the web. And the browser vendors often ignored the earlier specifications, proposed their own tags, or even implemented them in different ways.

By the time HTML 4.0 was published, the web community began to push browser developers to support the specification as it was written, and HTML 4.0 support nearly became universal. Around 2000 the W3C--that's the standards body responsible for publishing HTML--began the process of trying to move HTML towards XML by publishing the XHTML 1.0 specification. Now, their goal was to eventually have HTML follow the stricter rules of XML and have the language be more extensible.

For the most part it was exactly like HTML 4.0 with really only a few presentational tags removed and slightly stricter syntax rules. In fact, there are three different flavors of XHTML. There's transitional, strict, and frameset. Now transitional tells user agents to be a little bit more forgiving of syntax errors, while strict tells user agents to enforce strict parsing rules, even to the point of halting the loading of pages if errors are encountered. It's that degree of strictness that eventually doomed XHTML as adopting that type of error handling would basically break thousands of legacy sites all the way across the web.

Work on the XHTML 2.0 specification stagnated, and in 2009 the W3C dropped the charter, which halted all the work on it. That leads us to HTML5. While the W3C was so busy kind of spinning its wheels, if you will, on XHTML, a group of organizations and individuals got together in 2004 to continue the work on HTML, basically attempting to move the HTML 4.0 specification forward. And this group called themselves the Web HyperText Application Technology Working Group, which is usually referred to as the equally awkward WHATWG.

Their specification, which was entitled Web Applications 1.0, eventually was adopted by the W3C and renamed HTML5. Currently, the W3C works on publishing a stable version of this specification, while the WHATWG continues to work on what they call a living standard of the specification. Basically, what that means is they've removed the version number, simply referred to it as HTML. They just continued to update it. As a standard, HTML5 really isn't that different from HTML 4.

It introduces a few new elements. It gives user agents clear rules about how HTML should be parsed and how errors should be handled. But where the specification really diverges from HTML 4.0 is its focus on building applications. Things like drag and drop, location detection, and support for drawing services like canvas make it more of a platform for developing applications than a mere markup language. Now, for the most part, the W3C has split all those application-focused areas into their own specifications, so a lot of what you hear referred to as HTML5 is actually a collection of individual specifications.

What does that all mean for you? For the moment, the bulk of sites online use either HTML 4.0 or XHTML 1.0. To be honest, there's not a huge difference between pages that use HTML 4, XHTML, or even HTML5. XHTML requires slight differences in syntax and HTML5 introduces a few new elements. For the most part the biggest decision you'll be faced with is which doc type to use, which we'll cover a little bit later on. My advice is that if you're brand-new to web design, stick with learning the HTML 4.0 syntax.

Then learn the new tags that HTML5 gives you and when it's appropriate to use them and gradually add those newer HTML5 features as you become more comfortable with writing clean, well-structured HTML.

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