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Pushing changes to a remote repository

From: Git Essential Training

Video: Pushing changes to a remote repository

In the last movie we got an idea of how tracking branches work. In this movie, we will apply that while we also push some more changes up to the remote repository that we created. Notice that I'm inside my explore_ california directory, and I'm on the master branch. Before we can push some changes we need to make some changes. The change that I have in mind is going to be into the tours page. So let's open up tours.html, and if you notice over here I've got Backpack Cal, and I've got a link here that takes me to the Backpack Cal page, that page does exist.

Pushing changes to a remote repository

In the last movie we got an idea of how tracking branches work. In this movie, we will apply that while we also push some more changes up to the remote repository that we created. Notice that I'm inside my explore_ california directory, and I'm on the master branch. Before we can push some changes we need to make some changes. The change that I have in mind is going to be into the tours page. So let's open up tours.html, and if you notice over here I've got Backpack Cal, and I've got a link here that takes me to the Backpack Cal page, that page does exist.

Notice that the link that will take me to for that is tour_detail_backpack_cal.html, that's the format of the file name. Now California Calm does not exist yet, I don't have that page created. But notice that the page at once that take me to is tourDetail_calm.html, so the change that I want to make is for each one of these to put them in the same format as the one that does exist. So even though these don't go to files that are actually there yet, we're going to go and change the link so that if that file existed, and had the same format as Backpack Cal, it would go there.

All right, so let's make that change. So inside tours.html I'll open that up, and I'm just going to do a quick search for Detail, and I'm not going to Ignore case, and there it is, there is the first one, Detail_calm. So we'll make it _detail, do a search for the next one _detail, and the next one _detail, _detail, _detail, so a whole bunch of these.

Okay, so I've got all of those now. So I'm going to save this document and close it up, git status, we see the changes there. Let's go ahead and do git commit, and I'll do it with the -am option, so it'll do it all at once, and we'll say, "Change file/link format on tours.html." Okay, so now I've committed that change. Now just to be clear this is just a local operation.

This is the same kind of stuff we were doing at the very beginning, has nothing to do with the remotes whatsoever. We're just making a basic commit to our own master branch, our own local repository. Now at this point that's the only place that that change exists. So git log --oneline, there is the change right there, f3a370e. If we do git log --oneline origin/ master, that's the remote branch. Actually it's my copy of the remote branch, and you can see that it's not there right now, and we can actually compare the two by saying git diff master with origin/master, and actually probably you should swap those around because origin/master is behind master, and there's the changes. So that's all the changes that I just made between the two.

So what I want to do now is push my changes. All right, remember that we're pushing the changes just like we push the initial code we're going to push to origin master. So we can do git push origin master, and that's the exact same command that we used before to push up our changes, but because this is a tracking branch, remember we set it to be a tracking branch, we can just say git push. Much, much shorter. Git push wants to know my username, and there it is, it pushed. It knew where to push to because we're tracking that branch.

So whenever we do fetches and whenever we do pushes, it will assume that we want to go to that tracking branch. Very convenient. Saves you a lot of typing and having to think about what you're doing. You can just say git push, and it will push all the changes up to the remote branch. We can now see that that change is there, git log --oneline, and let's do origin/master, and let's just do the first three, and there it is. You'll see that it now shows up there. And sure enough, if you go back now to GitHub, and you take a look at GitHub, you'll see that the master branch now has that commit.

In fact, here it is latest commit to the master branch, Change file/link format on tours.html authored three minutes ago, and here's the commit number. If we click on that, it comes up and it shows us that same diff that we were looking at. So that we can see what the commit was. Now let's go back to our command line, and let's switch to our other project, the lynda_version. So this is as if we're looking at it from Lynda's point of view, from her repository. So we'll go backwards and into Lynda's version, and from here we'll say git log --oneline, and you can see that Lynda does not have that change yet.

It's in the explore_california repository, it's up on the remote repository, but lynda hasn't seen it. And that's because Lynda still needs to do a fetch in order to retrieve whatever changes have been pushed up the remote repository. Let's see how to do that in the next movie.

Show transcript

This video is part of

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Git Essential Training

89 video lessons · 27686 viewers

Kevin Skoglund
Author

 
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  1. 2m 46s
    1. Introduction
      1m 7s
    2. How to use the exercise files
      1m 39s
  2. 20m 24s
    1. Understanding version control
      4m 48s
    2. The history of Git
      7m 58s
    3. About distributed version control
      5m 4s
    4. Who should use Git?
      2m 34s
  3. 26m 12s
    1. Installing Git on a Mac
      3m 44s
    2. Installing Git on Windows
      5m 37s
    3. Installing Git on Linux
      1m 30s
    4. Configuring Git
      7m 29s
    5. Exploring Git auto-completion
      5m 35s
    6. Using Git help
      2m 17s
  4. 15m 49s
    1. Initializing a repository
      1m 58s
    2. Understanding where Git files are stored
      2m 34s
    3. Performing your first commit
      2m 4s
    4. Writing commit messages
      5m 22s
    5. Viewing the commit log
      3m 51s
  5. 17m 44s
    1. Exploring the three-trees architecture
      3m 57s
    2. The Git workflow
      3m 15s
    3. Using hash values (SHA-1)
      4m 7s
    4. Working with the HEAD pointer
      6m 25s
  6. 25m 52s
    1. Adding files
      5m 59s
    2. Editing files
      3m 56s
    3. Viewing changes with diff
      3m 35s
    4. Viewing only staged changes
      2m 28s
    5. Deleting files
      5m 29s
    6. Moving and renaming files
      4m 25s
  7. 19m 18s
    1. Introducing the Explore California web site
      2m 2s
    2. Initializing Git
      3m 48s
    3. Editing the support phone number
      6m 20s
    4. Editing the backpack file name and links
      7m 8s
  8. 38m 45s
    1. Undoing working directory changes
      3m 49s
    2. Unstaging files
      2m 37s
    3. Amending commits
      4m 50s
    4. Retrieving old versions
      4m 7s
    5. Reverting a commit
      3m 12s
    6. Using reset to undo commits
      3m 44s
    7. Demonstrating a soft reset
      4m 8s
    8. Demonstrating a mixed reset
      4m 7s
    9. Demonstrating a hard reset
      5m 8s
    10. Removing untracked files
      3m 3s
  9. 27m 22s
    1. Using .gitignore files
      8m 23s
    2. Understanding what to ignore
      4m 47s
    3. Ignoring files globally
      4m 49s
    4. Ignoring tracked files
      5m 26s
    5. Tracking empty directories
      3m 57s
  10. 26m 51s
    1. Referencing commits
      4m 52s
    2. Exploring tree listings
      3m 46s
    3. Getting more from the commit log
      7m 38s
    4. Viewing commits
      4m 4s
    5. Comparing commits
      6m 31s
  11. 39m 35s
    1. Branching overview
      4m 56s
    2. Viewing and creating branches
      2m 57s
    3. Switching branches
      2m 58s
    4. Creating and switching branches
      4m 53s
    5. Switching branches with uncommitted changes
      3m 26s
    6. Comparing branches
      4m 28s
    7. Renaming branches
      2m 28s
    8. Deleting branches
      4m 18s
    9. Configuring the command prompt to show the branch
      9m 11s
  12. 28m 32s
    1. Merging code
      3m 11s
    2. Using fast-forward merge vs. true merge
      6m 49s
    3. Merging conflicts
      7m 26s
    4. Resolving merge conflicts
      7m 5s
    5. Exploring strategies to reduce merge conflicts
      4m 1s
  13. 14m 34s
    1. Saving changes in the stash
      4m 5s
    2. Viewing stashed changes
      2m 39s
    3. Retrieving stashed changes
      4m 24s
    4. Deleting stashed changes
      3m 26s
  14. 1h 5m
    1. Using local and remote repositories
      6m 38s
    2. Setting up a GitHub account
      5m 39s
    3. Adding a remote repository
      4m 0s
    4. Creating a remote branch
      4m 3s
    5. Cloning a remote repository
      4m 26s
    6. Tracking remote branches
      4m 5s
    7. Pushing changes to a remote repository
      5m 8s
    8. Fetching changes from a remote repository
      5m 47s
    9. Merging in fetched changes
      4m 50s
    10. Checking out remote branches
      3m 22s
    11. Pushing to an updated remote branch
      2m 6s
    12. Deleting a remote branch
      3m 8s
    13. Enabling collaboration
      3m 40s
    14. A collaboration workflow
      8m 43s
  15. 16m 23s
    1. Setting up aliases for common commands
      5m 14s
    2. Using SSH keys for remote login
      2m 56s
    3. Exploring integrated development environments
      1m 4s
    4. Exploring graphical user interfaces
      4m 32s
    5. Understanding Git hosting
      2m 37s
  16. 55s
    1. Goodbye
      55s

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