Flash CS3 Professional Essential Training
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Working with movie clips


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Flash CS3 Professional Essential Training

with Rich Shupe

Video: Working with movie clips

The second symbol type I'd like to discuss is movie clip. Movie Clips are probably the most commonly used symbols, mainly because of their versatility. One of the main purposes of movie clips is to contain an animation. In fact, they function much like little {italic}Flash{plain} movies inside the main {italic}Flash{plain} movie, but they're not just for animation, they can also behave like buttons, and are even frequently used for the sole purpose of housing a single static element. At this stage thinking of movie clips much in the same way you think of the main {italic}Flash{plain} timeline, is probably half the battle in understanding how they work. They do have their own timelines, exactly like the one you see here, and they function very much the same way. For example, the default behavior of the main {italic}Flash{plain} movie is to play forever. When it uses reaches the end of the timeline, it will loop back to first frame, and begin again. Movie clips behave exactly the same way. A movie clip will play through to the end of its timeline, and when it reaches that last frame, it will loop back to frame one, and continue to play itself. This ability for movie clips to play independently of the main timeline, is one of their main attractions. For example, if we look at the timeline of the main movie we'll see that has one frame, and on stage are two movie clips. The first is a man, which shows all walk cycle. The second is a bit harder to see, because there's nothing in its first frame, we'll take a look at that in just a second, and it spells out a word overtime, if we look inside these movie clips, you'll see that they have multiple frames. However, when we play our movie, the multiple frame movie clips will still play in there entirety, and loop back to the beginning, even though the main movie has only one frame. I'll show you the result in just a second by testing the movie. But, before I do let me explain that the first movie clip I chose, will mirror the behavior of every default movie clip by playing infinitely, and looping back to first frame. The second movie clip, which we will create for our project, has a single line of ActionScript at the end of the animation to stop its movement. So, it will spell out the word products, and then stop animating. Okay, let's take a look, Control > Test Movie. You'll see the SWF is built. The walk cycle proceeds for ever, "products" has spelled itself out, and then stopped. Alright, let's take a look at the structure of these movie clips real quickly. Let's close the SWF, and go back to our main movie, and let's double-click to open up the man to begin with. As you can see by looking at the timeline of this movie clip, it's a little more than a series of sequential frames. This is an animation technique called frame by frame animation, in which you arrange your content exactly as you want it to be in each individual Frame. This is a technique similar to that of traditional cell animation. This effect can be achieved automatically by importing a sequence of numbered images. {italic}Flash{plain} with automatically recognize the sequence, create the necessary keyframes, and create the animation for you. We'll see this technique in action in chapter nine, {italic}Image {plain} {italic}Essential,{plain} when we learn about importing images. Now, let's take a look at the other movie clip. Let's go back to Scene 1, double-click on this movie clip. This movie clip is a little bit harder to select, because there's nothing in frame one, and therefore nothing to grab onto, but if you carefully click onto the circle reputation that {italic}Flash{plain} creates for you, you can open the movie clip, and you can see that this movie clip is created by a sequence of tweens, that is the computer will automatically calculate all of the in between frames, between two keyframes that you create. We'll learn more about that in chapter eight, {italic}Animation Essentials,{plain} and we will actually create this animation, which will spell out the word products, in our final project. As I drag through the timeline, you'll see that the tweens create their desired effect, increasing the scale of each letter, until it reaches the last frame and instead of looping this ActionScript is executed, which actually just says stop, and it will stop the movie clip from animating, and not allow it to loop back to frame one. We'll pick up more ActionScript as we go through the course. But, the main idea is to focus on the fact that the timelines for these movie clips are very similar to the main timeline, and the movie clip simply act as a {italic}Flash{plain} movie inside a {italic}Flash{plain} movie. Okay, let's go back to Scene 1, and select our man. And, let's focus on the properties of the movie clip. As we come down to the properties inspector, we'll see that they're very similar to the properties we sell with buttons. For example, we can set the width and height, the X and Y coordinates, the Color style, and the Blend mode. We can also instantiate the movie clips, so that we can control it with ActionScript. In fact, ActionScript is used to apply most manipulations to movie clips.
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  1. 3m 23s
    1. Welcome
      1m 30s
    2. Using the exercise files and cross-referencing
      1m 53s
  2. 23m 12s
    1. Creating a new document
      3m 33s
    2. The default workspace
      1m 44s
    3. Customizing your workspace
      5m 27s
    4. Reorganizing panels
      3m 52s
    5. Saving workspaces
      1m 49s
    6. Document tabs
      2m 24s
    7. Maximize mode
      1m 26s
    8. Finding help
      2m 57s
  3. 34m 20s
    1. Drawing tool basics
      1m 9s
    2. Drawing with the Pencil and Line tools
      4m 48s
    3. The improved Pen tool
      5m 38s
    4. The Quick Color tools
      1m 9s
    5. Drawing with shapes
      4m 1s
    6. Selecting content
      2m 18s
    7. Manipulating lines and fills
      6m 4s
    8. Painting with brushes
      2m 37s
    9. Erasing content
      2m 29s
    10. Understanding drawing modes
      4m 7s
  4. 16m 2s
    1. Using the Color Mixer
      6m 38s
    2. The Gradient Transform tool
      3m 12s
    3. Color swatches
      6m 12s
  5. 57m 35s
    1. Symbols overview
      7m 22s
    2. Creating and editing symbols
      2m 40s
    3. Nesting and breaking apart symbols
      6m 5s
    4. Working with buttons
      10m 59s
    5. Working with movie clips
      4m 25s
    6. Working with graphics
      5m 8s
    7. Using the Library
      3m 28s
    8. Transformation tools
      5m 15s
    9. Transformation panels
      6m 41s
    10. Transformation menus
      5m 32s
  6. 38m 27s
    1. Using layers
      11m 12s
    2. Adding, deleting, and grouping layers
      3m 35s
    3. What is a keyframe?
      4m 30s
    4. Using frames and keyframes
      6m 29s
    5. Working with multiple frames
      6m 59s
    6. Copying and pasting frames
      2m 45s
    7. Understanding scenes
      2m 57s
  7. 11m 19s
    1. Understanding document settings
      2m 5s
    2. Testing buttons and movie clips
      1m 24s
    3. Testing your movie
      1m 58s
    4. Publishing your movie
      5m 52s
  8. 34m 2s
    1. Vector vs. bitmap
      3m 57s
    2. Importing images and image compression
      8m 25s
    3. Importing Photoshop files
      5m 39s
    4. Importing Illustrator files
      4m 30s
    5. Tracing bitmaps
      7m 20s
    6. Breaking apart bitmaps
      4m 11s
  9. 43m 8s
    1. Shape tweening
      10m 58s
    2. Using shape hints
      2m 23s
    3. Tweening gradients
      3m 43s
    4. Motion tweening
      11m 54s
    5. Copy and Paste Motion
      2m 45s
    6. Motion guides
      4m 2s
    7. Custom easing
      7m 23s
  10. 41m 11s
    1. Understanding text types
      6m 0s
    2. Controlling text appearance
      6m 38s
    3. Simple text effects through tweening
      5m 46s
    4. Adding text to a project file
      19m 11s
    5. Spell-checking and Find and Replace
      3m 36s
  11. 33m 47s
    1. Using filters
      4m 4s
    2. Special filter options
      7m 57s
    3. Animating filters
      8m 7s
    4. Adding filters to a project file
      3m 34s
    5. Using blend modes
      3m 11s
    6. Flash-specific blend modes
      6m 54s
  12. 17m 11s
    1. Components overview
      4m 43s
    2. Adding a UIScrollBar component
      4m 16s
    3. Using a Loader component
      8m 12s
  13. 25m 3s
    1. Adding sound to the timeline
      4m 13s
    2. Adding basic effects to sounds
      4m 42s
    3. Sound sync options
      8m 59s
    4. Adding sound to buttons
      4m 47s
    5. Sound compression basics
      2m 22s
  14. 21m 37s
    1. Embedded vs. external
      3m 28s
    2. Embedding videos with the Flash Video Encoder
      9m 27s
    3. Encoding external FLVs with optional cue points
      4m 14s
    4. Playing external videos with the FLVPlayback component
      4m 28s
  15. 50m 59s
    1. Overview and interface elements
      6m 2s
    2. Frame scripts, tracing, and comments
      6m 8s
    3. Variable basics
      3m 0s
    4. Function basics
      4m 19s
    5. Buttons and EventListeners
      7m 59s
    6. Simple navigation
      16m 11s
    7. Scripting components
      7m 20s
  16. 24m 34s
    1. The story so far
      2m 27s
    2. Animated buttons
      6m 22s
    3. Animated masks
      9m 53s
    4. Publishing your site
      5m 52s
  17. 3m 5s
    1. Additional resources
      1m 12s
    2. Goodbye
      1m 53s

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Watch the Online Video Course Flash CS3 Professional Essential Training
8h 0m Beginner Apr 16, 2007

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In Flash CS3 Professional Essential Training, instructor Rich Shupe delves into the key aspects of working with Flash CS3 to create professional animations, design interactive websites, and incorporate audio and video into self-contained presentations. The training covers using the drawing and color tools, mastering the essentials of animation, and working with type, graphics, sound, and video. Rich also introduces the essentials of working with ActionScript 3.0. Exercise files accompany the tutorials.

Subject:
Web
Software:
Flash Professional
Author:
Rich Shupe

Working with movie clips

The second symbol type I'd like to discuss is movie clip. Movie Clips are probably the most commonly used symbols, mainly because of their versatility. One of the main purposes of movie clips is to contain an animation. In fact, they function much like little {italic}Flash{plain} movies inside the main {italic}Flash{plain} movie, but they're not just for animation, they can also behave like buttons, and are even frequently used for the sole purpose of housing a single static element. At this stage thinking of movie clips much in the same way you think of the main {italic}Flash{plain} timeline, is probably half the battle in understanding how they work. They do have their own timelines, exactly like the one you see here, and they function very much the same way. For example, the default behavior of the main {italic}Flash{plain} movie is to play forever. When it uses reaches the end of the timeline, it will loop back to first frame, and begin again. Movie clips behave exactly the same way. A movie clip will play through to the end of its timeline, and when it reaches that last frame, it will loop back to frame one, and continue to play itself. This ability for movie clips to play independently of the main timeline, is one of their main attractions. For example, if we look at the timeline of the main movie we'll see that has one frame, and on stage are two movie clips. The first is a man, which shows all walk cycle. The second is a bit harder to see, because there's nothing in its first frame, we'll take a look at that in just a second, and it spells out a word overtime, if we look inside these movie clips, you'll see that they have multiple frames. However, when we play our movie, the multiple frame movie clips will still play in there entirety, and loop back to the beginning, even though the main movie has only one frame. I'll show you the result in just a second by testing the movie. But, before I do let me explain that the first movie clip I chose, will mirror the behavior of every default movie clip by playing infinitely, and looping back to first frame. The second movie clip, which we will create for our project, has a single line of ActionScript at the end of the animation to stop its movement. So, it will spell out the word products, and then stop animating. Okay, let's take a look, Control > Test Movie. You'll see the SWF is built. The walk cycle proceeds for ever, "products" has spelled itself out, and then stopped. Alright, let's take a look at the structure of these movie clips real quickly. Let's close the SWF, and go back to our main movie, and let's double-click to open up the man to begin with. As you can see by looking at the timeline of this movie clip, it's a little more than a series of sequential frames. This is an animation technique called frame by frame animation, in which you arrange your content exactly as you want it to be in each individual Frame. This is a technique similar to that of traditional cell animation. This effect can be achieved automatically by importing a sequence of numbered images. {italic}Flash{plain} with automatically recognize the sequence, create the necessary keyframes, and create the animation for you. We'll see this technique in action in chapter nine, {italic}Image {plain} {italic}Essential,{plain} when we learn about importing images. Now, let's take a look at the other movie clip. Let's go back to Scene 1, double-click on this movie clip. This movie clip is a little bit harder to select, because there's nothing in frame one, and therefore nothing to grab onto, but if you carefully click onto the circle reputation that {italic}Flash{plain} creates for you, you can open the movie clip, and you can see that this movie clip is created by a sequence of tweens, that is the computer will automatically calculate all of the in between frames, between two keyframes that you create. We'll learn more about that in chapter eight, {italic}Animation Essentials,{plain} and we will actually create this animation, which will spell out the word products, in our final project. As I drag through the timeline, you'll see that the tweens create their desired effect, increasing the scale of each letter, until it reaches the last frame and instead of looping this ActionScript is executed, which actually just says stop, and it will stop the movie clip from animating, and not allow it to loop back to frame one. We'll pick up more ActionScript as we go through the course. But, the main idea is to focus on the fact that the timelines for these movie clips are very similar to the main timeline, and the movie clip simply act as a {italic}Flash{plain} movie inside a {italic}Flash{plain} movie. Okay, let's go back to Scene 1, and select our man. And, let's focus on the properties of the movie clip. As we come down to the properties inspector, we'll see that they're very similar to the properties we sell with buttons. For example, we can set the width and height, the X and Y coordinates, the Color style, and the Blend mode. We can also instantiate the movie clips, so that we can control it with ActionScript. In fact, ActionScript is used to apply most manipulations to movie clips.

Bare that in mind when we look at our next symbol type, Graphic.

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