Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Animation Tips and Tricks with Flash Professional
Illustration by John Hersey

Animating a zoom and rotate shot


From:

Animation Tips and Tricks with Flash Professional

with Dermot O' Connor

Video: Animating a zoom and rotate shot

In the previous section we did a really nice simple crane shot where we moved the camera up to look down at the character from a bird's eye view, and we are going to combine that this time with two more moves. And let's take a look at what this is going to look like. So I'll go Control>Test Movie>Test; that's really nice. So we're starting in close at a slight angle, the camera is zooming out and rotating out at the same time, and there is no end to how extreme you could make these moves, of course.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 6m 35s
    1. Welcome
      1m 4s
    2. Using the exercise files
      51s
    3. Common keystrokes and shortcuts used in this course
      4m 40s
  2. 1h 24m
    1. Understanding video versus SWF
      2m 30s
    2. Overview of shortcuts, extensions, and setup
      6m 27s
    3. Understanding linear and radial gradients
      2m 39s
    4. Overlapping and animating the colors
      3m 53s
    5. Lighting a scene
      10m 24s
    6. Creating lens flares
      10m 40s
    7. Animating ripples
      7m 2s
    8. Creating a gradient globe
      11m 41s
    9. Creating a gradient bottle
      10m 26s
    10. Applying gradients to a character's eye
      10m 2s
    11. Applying gradients to a character's skull
      8m 49s
  3. 56m 53s
    1. Tweening a circle to a square
      10m 9s
    2. Using thumbnails
      4m 39s
    3. Animating a magic carpet jump
      10m 12s
    4. Setting up a magic carpet walk cycle
      7m 41s
    5. Animating a magic carpet walk cycle
      9m 33s
    6. Shape tweening hair
      3m 50s
    7. Intro to overlapping hair
      1m 57s
    8. Animating overlapping hair
      8m 52s
  4. 1h 8m
    1. Animating waves
      8m 7s
    2. Animating clouds
      7m 48s
    3. Animating a flame
      11m 38s
    4. Animating an explosion
      9m 1s
    5. Adding in-betweens to the explosion
      4m 36s
    6. Adding explosion clusters
      6m 43s
    7. Optimizing the explosion
      7m 30s
    8. Animating smoke with particles
      12m 45s
  5. 32m 18s
    1. Introduction to staggers
      1m 5s
    2. Animating a simple stagger
      5m 8s
    3. Animating a diving board
      6m 15s
    4. Animating a tremor
      5m 56s
    5. Animating a scream
      7m 12s
    6. Refining the scream
      6m 42s
  6. 47m 49s
    1. Introduction to Virtual Camera
      5m 4s
    2. Animating parallax
      6m 9s
    3. Animating a crane shot
      6m 26s
    4. Animating a zoom and rotate shot
      9m 30s
    5. Animating a track shot
      11m 0s
    6. Lighting a 3D shot
      9m 40s
  7. 19m 48s
    1. Animating a cross dissolve
      6m 10s
    2. Animating a wipe
      3m 34s
    3. Animating a fadeout
      10m 4s
  8. 20s
    1. Goodbye
      20s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Animation Tips and Tricks with Flash Professional
5h 16m Intermediate Aug 09, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, author Dermot O' Connor introduces a variety of real-world issues that animators commonly encounter and offers practical solutions to them in Flash. The course covers how to apply gradients to create subtle texture and light characters, reducing the flat look of most cartoons; how to simulate natural phenomenon such as wind, fire, and clouds; how to mimic 3D space; and how to add fades and transitions to create custom cuts between scenes. The course also includes a look at staggers, which can be used to create camera shake, tremor effects, and extreme character reactions.

Topics include:
  • Overlapping and animating colors
  • Creating lens flares
  • Animating hair with shape tweens
  • Animating an explosion
  • Animating smoke with particles
  • Animating a scream
  • Using Virtual Cam
  • Lighting a 3D shot
  • Animating cross dissolves
Subjects:
3D + Animation Animation
Software:
Flash Professional
Author:
Dermot O' Connor

Animating a zoom and rotate shot

In the previous section we did a really nice simple crane shot where we moved the camera up to look down at the character from a bird's eye view, and we are going to combine that this time with two more moves. And let's take a look at what this is going to look like. So I'll go Control>Test Movie>Test; that's really nice. So we're starting in close at a slight angle, the camera is zooming out and rotating out at the same time, and there is no end to how extreme you could make these moves, of course.

So what I'm going to do is demonstrate how to create this nested sequence of symbols, to give us this illusion. So let's have a look; on the outer Timeline is the rotation action. Hard to see it separately, of course, because it's got the other movements nested inside of it. If we double-click on that to go inside, this is a symbol that contains the zooming action, and actually, if we double- click on that, this is the symbol that contains the crane shot, which we did in the previous section. So what I am going to do is -- it will be easier if I just make a new layer, and just get rid of the old one.

Before I do that, I want to flag something for you. The rotation action happens on this layer, and I have called it rotate, and I put a label on the Timeline called, the camera rotates, which you can access to the Properties panel. And let me just wreck that, let me rewrite it: the camera rotates. In the inside clip that contains the zooming action, I have called the layer zoom, called it the camera zooms out, this symbol is called 2 zoom. This should give you a clue that I like to know where I am. It's awfully easy, when you do these nested camera moves, to get lost, because there are so many, and they all look the same.

When you're looking at the rotation symbol, it looks exactly like the zoom in symbol, and it can really boggle your brain. That's why I put these labels everywhere. I like to know where I am; they are maps really. So okay, that said, let me just delete that, and we'll go into the library. I am going to take the crane symbol, and if you haven't got access to the Exercise files, your start state from here will be pretty much the same as your end state from wherever you did following along from the previous section. So let's go to the library, drag the crane into the Stage; even if you have the Exercise files just follow along, and delete everything. Just do exactly what I'm doing here.

Make sure that you're off the edge of the Stage. There might be a little mismatch there, so let's try to make sure we are completely lined up, and I think we are pretty good; padlock that. I am not seeing any white space. Little bit at the top there; I like to keep things pretty covered. Great. So now we have our symbol, and this contains the vertical move. We'll click on the symbol, and in your Properties panel be sure that you're set to graphic, and be sure you are set to either loop or play once. I prefer play once.

So then you've got your crane shot animation taken care off in here, and what I'm going to do is add a move on this external layer. So we have the crane shot nested safe inside a symbol called 1 crane, and on the main Timeline now I am going to add a zoom. So on Frame 80, I like where we end, and we are going to keep that consistent. So hit F6 to put down a keyframe there, and on Frame 1 we are going to zoom in. And I think the best way -- sometimes when I do these, because these things can get pretty big, and the edge, even if you have like a big Stage, sometimes the edge can be hard to find.

The way I like to increase these is hit Control+Alt+S. You will have the scale and rotate pop up. So be sure rotation for this is set to 0. And pick an increment for scaling that's big, but not too big; let's say 120%, and hit Enter. And there are occasions when I've had this little window disappear on me, or not pop up through the keyboard shortcuts, and let's see if we can find where it was. Transform>Scale and Rotate, there it is. Modify>Transform>Scale and Rotate. So if your keyboard shortcut doesn't work, or you're not able to do that; it's a little shortcut combination; that's how you access it.

So I am going to repeat, Control+Alt+S, and just keep doing that. And keep dragging your symbol until you keep it centered, Control+Alt+S; it becomes a pretty familiar shortcut. So there we go. I am not going to go in too big; that's about good enough I think. And this is going to be your zoom, of course, so let's call the layer zoom. And let's put a label in here camera zoom; uppercase, don't forget. Okay, so now we right-click on the Stage, and go Create Classic Tween, and there we have a zoom now combining with the vertical camera move. You'll notice the horizon line behind the character is moving up over his head.

As we are moving out, we are also moving up, and looking down. So it's a combination of two interesting actions to create a more dynamic shot. So now that we have this done, the time has come to nest this Timeline inside another symbol. So select the entire Timeline, right- click, Copy Frames, Insert>New Symbol, and we'll call this one 2 zoom new; click OK. And then the empty frame that appears, right-click, Paste Frames, and we should have our Timeline name correct, our label is telling us where we are, and our title is telling us where we are.

So now we go back to the main Stage and nothing happened. That's because the symbol has been created in the Library. So I am going to hide this layer, make a new layer, go into the Library and there is 2 zoom new. So let's drag this guy onto the Stage into the empty layer. It should be the same size as the one beneath. If you want you can use the one beneath as a position reference, so I am going to padlock the lower layer, put the upper one onto an outline, and just -- there we go. That's pretty close. So we can now delete the layer beneath. And don't worry about naming it, because this will be different. And so now we have everything safely nested, and if we double-click on this into the zoom new symbol, there we are; zoom, zoom, zoom.

So, I know it looks ridiculous, but trust me, it really does help. So now we are on the outside, and we are ready to apply the rotate. This will be the rotate section, so we call that rotate. In the Properties panel over here, we will just click on anywhere on here, and then label, we'll call this camera rotate. And don't forget the end state; I like the end state, that's the perfect place to end it. And now what I want to do is to rotate this image, so I will hit Control+Alt+S to scale and rotate.

I don't want to scale anymore, so I'm going to keep that at 100%. I do want to rotate this image to get kind of a corkscrew effect on the camera as we come out from the shot. So let's rotate this 25 degrees; something that we can really notice. And once we have that, we can now add a tween. Create Classic Tween, and there we go. So let's test this, Control>Test Movie>Test.

And the beauty of this method is that this will export as an AVI or a true MOV file. You won't have to do too many workarounds, or you need a PNG sequence. So this is a kind of technique that you could apply if you're working on something high-end for, say, a TV animated series or something. Obviously, you can do these kind of moves in After Effects and other programs, but there are times when you may want to do them in Flash. It really is handy to have the option of doing it inside a program with which you are familiar with; save you the trouble of having to composite them. And it does mean you can do things such as synchronize various movements and animations that you might have on the lower layers.

The only other thing I would warn you to watch out for is if you apply easing in or eating out, try to keep them as close as you can to one another. In other words, if you apply an ease out on the outer layer, let's say 80, so that we have a faster movement at the beginning. So let's say we have 100 ease out on the outer layer, and we'll do the same thing on the inner layer; they should all be the same. If you have a mismatch that can actually cause some pretty shaky camera moves, so I am trying to keep all these the same.

It's hardest to do if you use the custom ease in and ease out. You can, of course, keep them the same, but you do have to be a little more precise with that. So okay, that done, let us go Control>Test Movie>Test. Yeah, that's right, so now we are slowing in at the end. Not too bad. So that's the process, and I have to say, don't get frustrated. You will have to spend a little bit of time just playing with this. Start simple; don't go too crazy with like massive Stages or anything. This is about the right size to begin playing with before you go deeper in it.

But I've done some fairly complex shots with using these techniques; you can push them way further. And like I said, follow along, it's worth having a go at these from time to time, but do keep control over the names of your files, and you won't go too far wrong.

There are currently no FAQs about Animation Tips and Tricks with Flash Professional.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Animation Tips and Tricks with Flash Professional.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked