Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation

Animating dialogue using the mouth rig


From:

Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation

with Dermot O' Connor
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 3m 25s
    1. Welcome
      1m 9s
    2. Using the exercise files
      39s
    3. Prerequisites
      1m 37s
  2. 34m 58s
    1. Creating Flash-friendly character design
      4m 57s
    2. Animation rendering: SWF or AVI
      2m 24s
    3. Understanding line tool drawbacks when animating
      7m 7s
    4. Using uniform project scales in Flash
      3m 40s
    5. Finding helpful extensions for Flash
      2m 46s
    6. Using commands and keyboard shortcuts
      9m 53s
    7. Setting up your workspaces
      4m 11s
  3. 1h 35m
    1. Understanding character rigging
      2m 0s
    2. Exploring underlying structure in character rigging
      4m 27s
    3. Vectorizing the character body
      6m 22s
    4. Outlining colors in an animated character
      6m 15s
    5. Vectorizing the hands
      6m 43s
    6. Vectorizing the head
      4m 47s
    7. Outlining the head
      8m 20s
    8. Adding finishing touches with hair
      2m 11s
    9. Colorizing the character head
      7m 28s
    10. Colorizing the body
      5m 33s
    11. Applying gradients
      6m 18s
    12. Symbolizing and pivoting the body parts
      10m 47s
    13. Pivoting the head
      4m 42s
    14. Rigging the mouth
      10m 49s
    15. Rigging the eye
      8m 33s
  4. 52m 22s
    1. Tween types: Shape vs. motion
      5m 41s
    2. Combining motion and shape tweening
      4m 31s
    3. Animating an eye blink using shape tweening
      10m 2s
    4. Rigging a mouth in Flash for dialogue and expressions
      5m 30s
    5. Creating a D mouth
      12m 29s
    6. Creating an F mouth
      6m 58s
    7. Getting the polished look
      7m 11s
  5. 1h 2m
    1. Overview of the head turn
      2m 13s
    2. Preparing the rig
      8m 15s
    3. Posing the rig
      7m 17s
    4. Animating the head movement
      11m 5s
    5. Animating the body movement
      12m 9s
    6. Animating the head turn
      11m 28s
    7. Adding finesse to the head turn
      9m 34s
  6. 2h 44m
    1. Introducing the walk
      1m 5s
    2. Creating a profile view
      8m 30s
    3. Creating the head in profile
      10m 10s
    4. Creating the hand
      6m 57s
    5. Creating hand symbols
      8m 32s
    6. Reviewing the walk
      3m 6s
    7. Prepping the walk
      8m 33s
    8. Setting up the contact poses
      6m 45s
    9. Creating secondary contact poses
      9m 38s
    10. Finishing up the contact poses
      6m 48s
    11. Creating the passing poses
      9m 39s
    12. Finishing the passing pose
      5m 56s
    13. Animating the recoil position
      10m 9s
    14. Animating the high point of the walk
      9m 24s
    15. Adding in-betweens
      8m 31s
    16. Rigging the shoes
      8m 27s
    17. Animating the shoes
      11m 58s
    18. Animating the character's head movements
      8m 29s
    19. Fine-tuning the animation
      9m 0s
    20. Nesting the hand symbols
      8m 39s
    21. Repositioning the walk
      4m 11s
  7. 1h 32m
    1. Introducing the walk in place
      1m 30s
    2. Setting up contact poses
      10m 4s
    3. Creating the passing poses
      7m 14s
    4. Creating the recoil positions
      8m 11s
    5. Animating the head's high point
      4m 9s
    6. Tweening the legs
      5m 11s
    7. Tweening the arms
      10m 27s
    8. Setting the placement of the foot
      9m 9s
    9. Animating the shoes
      7m 52s
    10. Animating the hair
      6m 9s
    11. Creating secondary hand actions
      8m 48s
    12. Animating the torso
      6m 27s
    13. Repositioning the walk
      7m 17s
  8. 54m 9s
    1. Understanding dialogue
      49s
    2. Using the A-F system of six set mouth shapes
      4m 23s
    3. Animating dialogue using the mouth rig
      14m 30s
    4. Integrating the dialogue with the head turn
      5m 35s
    5. Animating the jaw
      6m 59s
    6. Creating an angry dialogue mouth
      7m 43s
    7. Finishing the angry dialogue mouth
      6m 38s
    8. Integrating acting techniques
      1m 51s
    9. Tips on facial expressions
      5m 41s
  9. 36s
    1. Goodbye
      36s

Video: Animating dialogue using the mouth rig

So let's start to animate some dialogue. So let's go into our Exercise Files. Let's open up the file called dialog_01. This is our same old rig. This is the rig that we worked on in the previous chapters. I'll make sure that everything inside is nice and clean and properly placed in their folders. We're going to add a line of dialogueue. Let's just get into that and start it. So it's a good practice to get into the habit of duplicating your symbols.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation
9h 19m Intermediate Nov 17, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation, Dermot O' Connor explains the process of character animation in Flash, using nested symbols and motion and shape tweening to create believable characters. The course covers the process from start to finish, from rigging a character to creating a walk cycle animation. Along the way, Dermot demonstrates techniques such as animating eye blinks, head turns, and mouth movements during dialogue. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Rendering in SWF or AVI
  • Creating vectors for the the character body
  • Coloring the body
  • Rigging a mouth in Flash
  • Posing the rig
  • Animating head and body movement
  • Creating hands
  • Understanding facial expressions
  • Making the contact poses
  • Creating passing poses
  • Animating in-betweens
Subjects:
3D + Animation Web Animation Character Animation
Software:
Flash Professional
Author:
Dermot O' Connor

Animating dialogue using the mouth rig

So let's start to animate some dialogue. So let's go into our Exercise Files. Let's open up the file called dialog_01. This is our same old rig. This is the rig that we worked on in the previous chapters. I'll make sure that everything inside is nice and clean and properly placed in their folders. We're going to add a line of dialogueue. Let's just get into that and start it. So it's a good practice to get into the habit of duplicating your symbols. So in this case, let's just go directly into the head symbol.

We're going to use the six shapes that we've created here for our dialogue. I don't want to work inside our mt or our mouth comp. Let's do that on a new one. So let's just right-click on this, and duplicate it. We're going to call it mt dialogue. So now when we toggle into that, you'll see it up here. Always good to check as well. So we need to access our line of dialogue. I've recorded a line earlier. It's just short and simple. So let's umport that, Import to Library.

I've got two lines, dialogue_1 and 2. Let's just open dialogue_1. Here it is. Let's have a listen. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So it's only a few words. I've designed this line, so that it uses all six of these shapes so we don't leave anyone out. The other thing I like to do is to make a folder for our sound files, even though we only have one sound file here. Let's have a good practice from the beginning. So we'll make a sound folder and just drop our audio into there. Nice. So next thing to do is make a layer for the sound and drop that in. Let's label it.

Not picky. So I like to color it too with white. All my layers that aren't actual active art layers, I like to just give them a white outline color. It's easy to pick them out. The next thing to do make sure we're on 30 frames per second. If you prefer to work on 24, that's fine. As long as you have a consistent and a good frame rate that you work from all the time. Don't mix and match, just pick one or the other. So let's stretch out the Timeline, so we can see the entire line of dialogue. Don't need to go too far past that.

The other thing you need to do is when you click on the first frame of the sound file, go into your Properties panel and make sure your Sync setting is set to Stream. If you set it to Event, it'll be harder to synchronize with your sound file. So, all is set to Stream for your dialogue. Let's give it a play to make sure. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So you get an idea for the rough placement of everything. Our next step is to position the correct mouth shapes to correspond with the dialogue. There is any number of people who have their favorite ways of doing this.

I've done quite a bit. So I'll show you mine. So the first thing I do is clean up the Timeline a little bit. So let's grab all of the dialogue and just pull it. If you had a very long line of dialogue that was running well off the screen, if it was several minutes long, I just work in chunks like this. Sometimes I like to make the panel a bit longer of course, by shifting the Library pane over. So I have a longer Timeline. That's ideal for this. So you get rid of these and just have your entire screen filled with Timeline, because you're going to be moving quite fast through all this business here.

So let's pull this back in. So this is where we use our best friend, the Alt or Option key. We hold down the entire vertical stack of keys and drag. We know our first month is probably going to be either a closed mouth or just very slightly the open mouth. So let's see which. I think starting with a slightly open mouth might be a little more appealing. Let's do that. So then let's have a little listen. Switch off the animation of the mouth for a minute. Let's put a new layer down here. What I like to do is listen through and find the most important mouth in the mouth shape or phonetic sound in the line of dialogue.

That's the one thing you can't cheat. That's the closed mouth. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So that's the P sound in "happening." The mouth has to be closed on that. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So that's somewhere about here. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Right there. So put down F7. Make a blank key. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) You can see if you're hitting it just by looking at the blank key. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Excellent! So that's our closed mouth. So let's select this vertical column of keyframes. Alt/Option and drag a line that with our blank.

Don't even bother looking at it. We are a long way away from even testing the animation now. I find that the second most important and striking mouth shapes are the ooh sounds. We have a couple of them. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) We have one on "what's," the W sound. (Audio recording: What's happening now? What's happening now?) So there is one here, and roughly one here. (Audio recording: What's?) So I'm hearing that "wha" around this point. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Just by tapping the Enter key. I can play that.

(Audio recording: What's?) Until I'm happy with that placement. That looks pretty good. Let's get the second one. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So I'm seeing that "ow" sound about here. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Don't forget we'll be tweening into the shape. We have a little bit of wiggle room here. That's the F mouth shape. So let's select this column of shapes. Hold down Alt/Option and paste both of those blank keyframes. Those are the shapes that we really cannot fake.

They have to be pretty obvious and solid in their position. We can probably move them a couple of frames one side or the other. But this is good. So the next thing we do is the open and the closed mouth. I would think that the next most important shape are the quiet points in the sounds. So for example "what's," the S sound will be this mouth shape. If you actually make that shape yourself, "what's," you can actually feel the corner of your mouth closing and your corners of your mouth moving back. So, that's going to be somewhere between the F and the A.

Wha-t's happening? So it's pretty fast. (Audio recording: What's happening?) So, that S sound is somewhere about here. (Audio recording: What's happening?) There is another one after "happening." The G sound in "happening," "happening now," about here. Just drop in F7 at the middle note mouth. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) What's happening now and that B, let's put these B's in. Again, hold down the Alt or Option key and drag. You'll notice that I'm also being sure that I copy the labels.

These are critical, because these will prevent me from getting lost. If we didn't have this layer, it would be absolutely impossible. I wouldn't know where to begin with doing that. I've actually seen people who do this system and not use the label layer. That's a great way for a headache, so let's keeping. What's-- (Audio recording: What's happening now?) We need to look at the thing. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) I think the other big point to have this B shape after the now. I think you'll come back and end in that position. So let's just put that in here.

I don't want to switch off all this tweening business. We don't need to have anything in there. That'll be a solid end. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So the next thing is the open mouth. We have two of these to pick from, and at least in these larger keys. Bear in mind that whichever one of these frames that you use, we should correspond roughly with the degree of the volume with the character. So if he is really yelling, you'll be wanted to use the wide open D mouth. If he is a little quieter, maybe the C or even some of these in between fames, so we can also keyframe these, and use them on the Timeline.

So let's find the biggest broadest sound. (Audio recording: What's happening now? What's happening now?) I think the "now" is the loudest of the sounds, so let's pull that in here. After he says, what's happening now?, "what's happening," which is this point here, I think we get to hold that for a little bit. So again, Alt/Option and drag that. Let's switch off those tweens, make the Timeline easier to see. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) You can already see the "now." "Now" is nicely articulated.

Now you might find when you're doing this-- I've been doing this for a long time. It's something I'm already familiar with. Another way that you might be able to help yourself keeping your position and all this is making other label layer and writing the words. So in the Properties panel. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So they're pretty tight here. These are going to get a little scrunched. I used to do this. As you get more practice with it, you find you'll do this less and less.

(Audio recording: What's happening...) Let's pull this "what's" back a little bit. It doesn't have to be super exact. Just give us a rough placement. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Excellent! Because I'm very picky, let's keep that white. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Okay, so now we have the beginning of the scene. What's. So if you go from this B into the F, the B mouth shape into the F mouth shape, you'll see it's a very weak transition. I'd like to have the mouth open a little bit before I go into this ooh shape. So we could go into the C mouth. This might be a bit too broad. But let's try it.

Alt, Option, and then drag again. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Actually, that's pretty good. By going into this shape, it's like he is like he is taking a little breath. He is taking in some air. He is preparing to make the shape. This is also a good time. You might want to look into a mirror if you're not sure about how the line should look. Actually, you just say the line yourself, "what's happening now," and see how your mouth moves. So anyway, we went to this ooh, and now we are into the "what's happening." So this is the F into the B. So this is "what's happen," and this is the B. So "what's happening?" So we should have like an open shape in here.

I'm going to pick a bigger one. I don't like to use the same shape, if I can avoid it, so like to vary them a little bit. So let's make an in between shape maybe this one. Hit F6. This won't have a label, because it's an between. But I think we can figure it out. Let's see if this works. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) It's a bit poppy. So this is going "what's happening." "What's happening?" So one of the things that you will find when you do dialogue is this dynamic choice process. You don't want to under animate it or over animate it. So this may be overdone. Let's have a look.

(Audio recording: What's happening now?) Do we have enough frames to do this smoothly, or should we take out this little B mouth? Again, we have to get from "what's happening," "what." So this is called phrasing and how much emotion can we do with the outer mouth. Don't forget a lot of the articulation happens inside the mouth with the toungue. You don't have to create a mouth shape for every single syllable on the Timeline. If you do, it'll look like a little clockwork machine. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So I want to get this guy to say "what's happening." So from F to B, I think we can change the sequence of these.

So if you go "what's" as one smooth move, and then from this into the wide open mouth. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) And the closed month will read if we go from open mouth into a closed mouth. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) It goes from this P sound in hap and we want to get to this sound for ing. So that's a very poor transition as you can see. So let's put a little wide open mouth in there. I'm going to use the C mouth.

(Audio recording: What's happening now?) I'm feeling like it's too choppy. So I'm actually going to delete this B mouth here. It's just too much happening. That's another good rule of thumb when you do dialogue is to go from your closed mouth and quickly into the open mouth shape, and that have more frames slowing into the closed. So you open fast, and you close a little more slowly. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Much better. So there is one the most common issues that you're going to encounter. Don't make it too complicated.

You can cheat over some of the syllables and the sound forms and the phonemes that we're going to be hearing. (Audio recording: What's happening now? What's happening now?) If you see that chatter effect that we saw earlier, then that's a warning sign to you. I've got too many shapes in there. Again, break it down. Go back to the core frames that you can't cheat. You have to have the ooh, which is the F shape. You'll have to have the closed mouth, which we call the A mouth. So these are locked. We might be able to push them one frame to the left or the right, sometimes maybe little more.

I hate to use the word cheating. It's a little cruel. But it's certainly about not over animating the shape. It's mistake number one that you'll probably end up committing. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So then the last thing will be to add some ease-ins and ease-outs to make this look a little more natural. I find this very tedious. So in a previous chapter, where I have created some commands, generate our own tweens. But you can also do them manually if you don't want to mess with those. So let's do that here. I'm using the classic tween.

You can also use the slightly more sophisticated one. The nice thing about using this system is that it's easier to keep them precise. I like that these all have to match. If this tween is easing out 100, basically to slow into this pose, then all these must do the same. So let's do that. Let's make them all 100 and that one. I've already made these scripts, which I have mapped onto the numeric keyboard. So I'm going to using these. It'll be a lot quicker. So I'm going to Ease 50 on all of these and ease in on this side.

Just make it be a little more natural. You can apply a few more. Every time you see if you're in between frames here, that's a good spot. I'm easing into this frame here. Okay, let's see how that changes. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) So the last step. Once we are reasonably happy with that is we can delete if you like the source frames out here. (Audio recording: What's happening now?) Okay, so that's it. That is the dialogue line. I think we're ready to move on to some other techniques that'll help you with dialogue.

There are currently no FAQs about Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Flash Professional CS5: Character Animation.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked