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Effective Storytelling with Final Cut Pro X

Trimming distractions from a story


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Effective Storytelling with Final Cut Pro X

with Diana Weynand

Video: Trimming distractions from a story

When I read a book I can get completely distracted at the sight of a typo or mistake. Why is there an extra period here? Why didn't they catch the spelling mistake there? And all those seemingly innocent little distractions can take us completely out of a story. So before you can decide if you like a certain combination of clips, you may need to trim those pesky little distractions, the extra line you don't want, the audio pop or camera jerk, the narrator's cough, the false start. This will help you stay connected to the flow of the story and continue to refine the shape of your story at the same time.
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  1. 5m 54s
    1. Welcome
      1m 20s
    2. Using the exercise files
      4m 34s
  2. 16m 21s
    1. Exploring different types of storytellers
      7m 9s
    2. Identifying story elements
      5m 9s
    3. Finding the essence of the story
      4m 3s
  3. 15m 6s
    1. Organizing footage into folders
      5m 29s
    2. Creating a disk image as a contained workspace
      4m 51s
    3. Importing folders and stills as keyword collections
      4m 46s
  4. 22m 52s
    1. Adding keywords to make clips accessible
      3m 33s
    2. Using favorite tags to call clips into action
      7m 16s
    3. Making notes to capture observations
      4m 1s
    4. Performing a complex search
      2m 28s
    5. Prepping clips for editing
      5m 34s
  5. 28m 47s
    1. Finding the meat of the clips
      5m 11s
    2. Don't be puzzled over your first edit
      4m 27s
    3. Creating project versions and developing story diversity
      5m 16s
    4. Putting story threads in order
      7m 25s
    5. Sculpting the story within the timeline
      6m 28s
  6. 46m 5s
    1. Trimming distractions from a story
      6m 48s
    2. Compounding thoughts into one primary story project
      9m 52s
    3. Evaluating the project for story content and pacing
      7m 1s
    4. Fine-tuning the edits in a project
      7m 36s
    5. Refining the primary sound bed
      7m 55s
    6. Organizing separate story segments into independent storylines
      6m 53s
  7. 24m 11s
    1. Storyboarding a narrative script using placeholders
      7m 22s
    2. Recording a narration track to explore script ideas
      4m 40s
    3. Changing pitch in a temporary narration track to identify different characters
      5m 27s
    4. Adding sound effects to create depth
      6m 42s
  8. 41m 2s
    1. Embellishing the story with cutaways to B-roll footage
      9m 3s
    2. Finessing cutaways to enhance the story
      5m 3s
    3. Editing and arranging a still-image storyline
      6m 22s
    4. Applying the Ken Burns effect to still images
      6m 33s
    5. Altering your story's "look" using the Color Board
      8m 4s
    6. Applying effects to enhance story elements
      5m 57s
  9. 28m 57s
    1. Retiming to lengthen or shorten music and clips
      6m 48s
    2. Adding freeze frames to end or start sections
      6m 40s
    3. Video finishing touches
      8m 6s
    4. Audio finishing touches
      7m 23s
  10. 1m 7s
    1. Goodbye
      1m 7s

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Effective Storytelling with Final Cut Pro X
3h 50m Intermediate Feb 01, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Dive into narrative with Diana Weynand, as she shares a comprehensive method for finding, crafting, and developing a compelling story in Apple Final Cut Pro X. The course also covers key concepts such as building a primary storyline, evaluating content and pacing, trimming distracting clips, creating different story versions, and storyboarding. The course also explores how to capture and organize media, incorporate B-roll cutaways, apply the Ken Burns effect to still images, re-time music and clips, and add finishing touches.

Topics include:
  • Identifying story elements
  • Finding the essence of a story
  • Importing folders and stills as keyword collections
  • Using keywords to make clips accessible
  • Prepping clips for editing
  • Developing story diversity
  • Sculpting the story within the timeline
  • Fine-tuning edits
  • Organizing separate story segments into independent storylines
  • Recording a narration track
  • Adding sound effects
  • Applying effects to enhance story elements
  • Adding freeze frames
Subjects:
Video Video Editing
Software:
Final Cut Pro
Author:
Diana Weynand

Trimming distractions from a story

When I read a book I can get completely distracted at the sight of a typo or mistake. Why is there an extra period here? Why didn't they catch the spelling mistake there? And all those seemingly innocent little distractions can take us completely out of a story. So before you can decide if you like a certain combination of clips, you may need to trim those pesky little distractions, the extra line you don't want, the audio pop or camera jerk, the narrator's cough, the false start. This will help you stay connected to the flow of the story and continue to refine the shape of your story at the same time.

In the Project Library let's open the Importers project. There are several clips toward the beginning of this project that have additional lines or words that don't contribute to the story. In order to take a closer look at the audio waveform, let's press Command+ a few times to zoom in. You can use your scroll button on a mouse to scroll back and forth. Let's dive in in the second clip of Paul, Paul 2, and listen to how he begins this clip. (Video Playing) Paul: And here at Thanksgiving Coffee Company we've learned to focus on -- Diana Weynand: So here are at Thanksgiving Coffee Company, this is going to be the good start to something, he's introducing himself and who he is attached to, but we don't need that and at the beginning.

So we can simply drag using the Trim tool to get rid of that little distraction. (Video Playing) Paul: Here at Thanksgiving Coffee Company we've learned to focus on the people. If -- Diana Weynand: And the same thing happens at the end. Let's zoom in a little further. (Video Playing) Paul: on the people -- Diana Weynand: After he says the people, we're done with this clip. So the next step is to move onto the next thought. But it might be harder for you to move to the next thought if you're being distracted by the last thing he says.

(Video Playing) Paul: if -- So go ahead as we did before, just using the default Selection tool, grab the tail end of that clip and drag it up so that we trim the end of that clip. (Video Playing) Paul: Here at Thanksgiving Coffee Company we've learned to focus on the people. Diana Weynand: So that thought is now much more concise and it's going to allow us to compare it or to position it with other thoughts that allow the story to be moved forward. Well, let's take a look at the next clip Paul 2, and see if we can remove any distractions from this clip.

(Video Playing) Paul: So -- Diana Weynand: Well, the so in this clip doesn't really help us move the story forward at all. So one thing you can do is just grab and trim like we did before, but another thing that you can do is press M to set a marker at a location where you want the new endpoint to be. Press M again and it brings up the Marker window. And we can just type a note, trim to here. Now another thing we can do is make that a To Do Item. When we make it a To Do Item and click Done, the marker turns red, it now becomes more urgent.

It grabs our attention a little bit more. And using markers is a great way to make a little bit of a note on something to say don't forget to do this. Maybe you don't want to stop and fix things right now, but at least address the issue by putting a note on it. Let's take a look at Ben's clip and see if there's anything there that we need to improve. (Video Playing) Ben: We worked really closely with the farmers to help them develop this co-operative as a business, and to learn about the American speciality coffee market. To really understand the kind of quality that we're looking for; that our customers are looking for. And then to work -- Diana Weynand: So again, and I am going to go ahead and zoom into Ben's clip.

I was with him all along until he started going off into a different thought at the end of the clip and I know I don't want that another thought. So. (Video Playing) Paul: customers are looking for -- Diana Weynand: So right after the looking for, let's add another marker at that point so we know we want to trim from here to end, and make it a To Do marker. I am going to press Shift+Z, because now that we have two To Do markers I want to show you how helpful they can be if you take the approach of instead of trimming the distractions away as you go, marking that distraction to come back later to work on.

Click the Timeline Index button at the bottom of the timeline, and this brings up your Index. When you click tags and then make sure you click the To Do Markers button, only the Marker To Do buttons appear. Now as you screen other areas or work on other areas, when you get ready to go back and fix those distractions and remove them, you can simply click on a To Do item and it takes you there immediately. The other nice thing is that you can just zoom in, because what's easy is that you can trim that clip and as you are trimming, with Snapping on, it will snap to the marker.

Click the next marker and the same thing. Grab that endpoint and snap to the red marker. Then you can close your Timeline Index. I am going to press Shift+Z. Sometimes you want to hide a certain portion of a clip, because as we've been discussing some aspect of it is distracting. Let's take a closer look at this coffee tasting clip, and I am going to zoom in quite a bit so that we can really focus on this clip. Let's just listen to this clip. (Video Playing) Curt Fissel: Spin it a little bit longer.

I love the steam coming up. Female Speaker: Yeah, it's beautiful. Diana Weynand: Well, this is a lovely shot and I agree with Curt Fissel, the Director, and the Director of Photography that the steam is beautiful. However, we may not want to hear him say that, because that may be one of those distractions that takes your head out of where you are in the story at this point. So in order to keep this clip the length it is and not hear those audio bits, what we are going to do is right-click on the clip and say Expand Audio/Video. When we expand the audio and video, it allows us to trim just one side or the other, and I am going to trim over what appears to be his dialog.

I may not have gotten it all, so let's see. (Video Playing) Looks like it was clean there. Let's see when he begins talking on the other end. (Video Playing) Curt Fissel: I love the steam coming up. Female Speaker: Yeah, it's beautiful. Diana Weynand: So what we can do is just trim the audio out earlier, so that we do not hear the director. Now you may feel like, okay, it's a little bumpy there at the beginning. So let's go ahead and start a little later.

No worries. Just go ahead and trim the video portion by itself. Distractions in your story are just that, distracting. So before you try to refine your story, take a minute to rid the project of many distractions that keep your story at bay.

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