Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X
Illustration by John Hersey

Importing and analyzing media from a folder on your computer


From:

Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X

with Abba Shapiro

Video: Importing and analyzing media from a folder on your computer

Before you can start editing we need to bring some media into Final Cut Pro. Now the way media is handled in Final Cut Pro X is in some ways radically different than in previous versions of Final Cut Pro, and in other ways is very similar. The first thing you need to do to bring media into Final Cut Pro is go to the File menu and go Import Files. Now the keyboard shortcut is a little different than you might expect. It's Shift+Command+I. Go ahead and select Import Files, and you'll notice this dialog window.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 4m 13s
    1. Welcome
      1m 18s
    2. Using the exercise files
      2m 55s
  2. 16m 47s
    1. Touring the new interface
      7m 58s
    2. Running Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X on the same machine
      4m 45s
    3. Preferences and settings
      4m 4s
  3. 37m 12s
    1. Importing and analyzing media from a folder on your computer
      7m 47s
    2. Importing media from a camera storage card
      3m 54s
    3. Importing video from a tape-based camera
      3m 12s
    4. Organizing media in the Event Library
      6m 31s
    5. Organizing and keywording clips
      10m 1s
    6. Viewing clips in the Event Library
      5m 47s
  4. 59m 20s
    1. Creating and managing projects
      6m 45s
    2. Performing basic edits in the Primary Storyline
      8m 36s
    3. Editing in the timeline, including Ripple, Roll, Slip, and Slide edits
      6m 36s
    4. Adding and adjusting audio
      9m 21s
    5. Editing B-roll with connected clips
      5m 0s
    6. Creating compound clips as an alternative to nested sequences
      2m 13s
    7. Legacy editing paradigms
      3m 31s
    8. Fine-tuning with the Precision Editor and performing three-point edits
      6m 22s
    9. Using favorites to create subclips
      6m 54s
    10. Using markers
      4m 2s
  5. 38m 45s
    1. Adding and adjusting transitions
      8m 22s
    2. Creating titles
      7m 13s
    3. Applying motion effects to clips
      7m 34s
    4. Retiming clips to create speed effects and creating freeze frames
      7m 11s
    5. Making color corrections
      8m 25s
  6. 14m 17s
    1. Exporting from Final Cut Pro X
      6m 11s
    2. Advanced exporting using Compressor
      2m 10s
    3. Collaboration and archiving
      5m 56s
  7. 3m 26s
    1. Next steps
      3m 26s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X
2h 54m Beginner Jul 11, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X gives video editors a comprehensive tour of the new tools and the interface makeover for Apple's premier video editing software. It showcases the differences from Final Cut Pro 7 and paves the way for a painless upgrade experience. Author Abba Shapiro covers the new interface and workflows in Final Cut X, the magnetic timeline, connected clips, and the deep integration of color correction and sound editing.

This course helps experienced Final Cut Pro editors understand new ways of performing traditional editing techniques. New terminology and new tools for performing editing functions are also clarified.

Topics include:
  • Touring the X interface
  • Running Final Cut Pro 7 and X on the same machine
  • Importing and analyzing media
  • New editing methods (including append and connected clips)
  • Timeline editing (including ripple, roll, slip, and slide edits)
  • Adding audio
  • Fine-tuning with the Precision Editor
  • Adding and adjusting transitions
  • Creating titles
  • Applying motion effects to clips
  • Performing color corrections
  • Exporting
  • Archiving and collaboration
Subjects:
Video Video Editing
Software:
Final Cut Pro
Author:
Abba Shapiro

Importing and analyzing media from a folder on your computer

Before you can start editing we need to bring some media into Final Cut Pro. Now the way media is handled in Final Cut Pro X is in some ways radically different than in previous versions of Final Cut Pro, and in other ways is very similar. The first thing you need to do to bring media into Final Cut Pro is go to the File menu and go Import Files. Now the keyboard shortcut is a little different than you might expect. It's Shift+Command+I. Go ahead and select Import Files, and you'll notice this dialog window.

Now we can add our imported media to an existing event, which we've touched on a little bit earlier, or in our case we want to create a new event specifically for this footage. This will allow us to do two things. one easily organize a footage and two, we're going to target this footage to go to an external drive or in our case a scratch drive. I am going to click on Create New Event and I am going to call this event Additional footage. And as you can see I can save this to my original drive or at any external drive that is attached to my computer.

Now we cannot save this to a SAN. We can read from a SAN, or a Shared Area Network, but we can't write to a SAN at this point. Now let's go down the list and take a look at some of our options that we can check or uncheck when we bring our media into Final Cut Pro X. The first one is when we bring the media into Final Cut Pro X. Under Organizing there is a checkbox that says Copy files to Final Cut Events folder. If this is checked, whatever media you point to is actually copied onto the drive where you target.

Sometimes you want this and sometimes you don't. If you like the old way of working where you just created aliases of your media, simply leave this box unchecked and Final Cut will just point to whatever drive the media is originally stored on. Now there is an exception to this rule. If you're copying media off of a card, a CompactFlash card, an SD card, a P2 card, Final Cut will always copy that media into your events folder. The next checkbox is also important. This is Import folders as Keyword Collections. Now what does that mean? For instance, let's say you've already organized your media into folders, Music and B-Roll and what not.

Let's take a look at how our previously organized my folders. As you see I have a B-Roll folder, Interviews, Greenscreen, Music and so on. When I import this media, not only is it going to make aliases of this media but it's also going to attach specific metadata to it. So I'll be able to search and find all my graphics file, all my voiceover files, all my Jackie photos. I'll actually be able to search by either Jackie, photos or both. Let's go back to Final Cut and continue to look at our list. I'm going to make sure that Import folders as Keyword Collections is checked.

Now when it comes to Transcoding, you have a choice. With Final Cut Pro X you can either edit your footage in its native format. So if it was shot on a Canon 7D and H.264, you can edit natively. But a lot of times that's a lot of extra work for the CPU. So you may choose to actually transcode that media to either ProRes 422 or to ProRes Proxy. For now we are going to uncheck optimized media because I can always come back later once the file is imported, right- click on any file, and optimize it at that stage.

As we go down the list you see you can analyze for stabilization and rolling shutter. This is incredibly useful for these new DSLR cameras that we are working with, because a lot of times when you're shooting handheld with these cameras it's really hard to get a nice stable shot. Another thing these cameras suffer from is what's called a rolling shutter. The CMOS sensor on the camera actually gives you a wavy look if you do any kind of quick panning. Final Cut Pro can analyze and correct for this. Also if you happen to not have the right color balance on your footage, maybe it's too blue from the daylight or there was a light influencing, such as the footage we're looking at, will be people dancing on stage, which will be lit, and we want to make sure that we can balance the color, Final Cut can analyze that in advance and you can simply click a button and fix the problem. And we'll look at that in a later movie.

Now the next one really excites me. It's the Find people selection. What Final Cut Pro X can do is as it brings the footage in it can actually look at the footage and determine how many people are in a shot??one person, two people, a group of people??and it can actually create smart folders or smart collections which will break it up so I can quickly say, oh I need a two shot for this next scene or I need a wide shot or a close-up or a medium shot, and I don't have to dig through all my footage. Final Cut has already done that for me.

And finally if you look at the Audio section, Analyze and fix audio problems. What Final Cut Pro X does for you is it fixes those problems that you used to have to battle in Final Cut Pro 7. If there is hum in the audio, it can automatically fix. That's 50 and 60 cycle hum. It can also look for background noise and try to fix for that. One of my favorite new features in Final Cut Pro X is the ability to separate mono and group stereo audio. What does that mean? Well, it determines if it's a single channel, dual mono, stereo, or as you see for the last checkbox, perhaps you even left some channels empty and you used to have to delete those when you were editing.

Final Cut Pro does all this work in advance. Let's go ahead and click Import on our first folder. Now we have a couple of choices here. We are going to actually import both the 7D footage, and I am going to step back just a little further and we also have a folder called EDN additional media. This is the folder that I showed you earlier that had all of those subfolders in it. So let's go ahead click Import and see what happens. Immediately Final Cut points to all this footage and I can actually start editing while it's importing it and analyzing it.

Now if I want to see the status of what it's analyzing, I can go over to my HUD, and on the left side you see a spinning circle. If I click on that, it actually brings up a window for my background tasks. I am going to reveal the disclosure triangle and I can see the video that it's analyzing. Let's go ahead and close that window and take a look on the left side of our screen to the Event Library, and as you can see, there is our Additional footage event and in there are our smart folders. B-Roll, Graphics, Greenscreen, Interviews, and I can click on this and you see all my greenscreen footage is there.

In addition it is analyzing the footage for Group shots, Medium shots, One Person, Two Persons or Wide Shot. Let's go ahead, we'll click on One Person, and there we are. We have all of our single individual shots. If I want to see group shots I'll go over here and what it's already analyzed for the Group shots it has already found. Now remember, I only asked Final Cut to analyze for people when I imported the video. This doesn't limit me. If I want, I can go back and have it reanalyze this footage for other problems such as audio, color balance, or shake in my footage.

To do that I simply click on the main event folder. I am going to shrink these down so we can see them a little better. I can select any clip that I've already ingested. Right-click on it, select Analyze and fix, and go back and say now fix audio problems or in our case maybe balance for color. As you can see importing is quite different in Final Cut Pro X than it was in Final Cut Pro 7, but it's going to give you a lot more flexibility and make your editing that much easier.

There are currently no FAQs about Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.