Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Reviewing the major internet genealogy sites

From: Growing and Sharing Your Family Tree

Video: Reviewing the major internet genealogy sites

I want to give you a tour of the major genealogy family history websites. By no means will this be an exhaustive tour. We are going to look at a handful of the more than 200,000 such sites. I have created a PDF that you can download that lists these sites so you can follow along with that. We'll start with Cyndi's List, the grandmother of all such sites. This is an aggregator site started by Cyndi Howells. It has links to genealogy family history websites around the world and the number of links is now more than 264,000. You don't go here to track down a particular ancestry. You go here to get some help as you do your family tree research.

Reviewing the major internet genealogy sites

I want to give you a tour of the major genealogy family history websites. By no means will this be an exhaustive tour. We are going to look at a handful of the more than 200,000 such sites. I have created a PDF that you can download that lists these sites so you can follow along with that. We'll start with Cyndi's List, the grandmother of all such sites. This is an aggregator site started by Cyndi Howells. It has links to genealogy family history websites around the world and the number of links is now more than 264,000. You don't go here to track down a particular ancestry. You go here to get some help as you do your family tree research.

Let's move on to the major records repository, starting with the big one ancestry.com. This is owned by the same company that owns Family Tree Maker. They're very closely connected as you have noticed with your ancestry hints, those little green leaves. I will talk about ancestry .com in a separate video. Let's move on to the other major site. This is called familysearch.org. It's owned by the Mormon Church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The reason the LDS Church is involved in family research is they believe that they can baptize the dead by proxy thereby bringing family members into the Church after they have died thereby allowing people to see each other after they died.

And so that's why they do so much family research. You can come to this site whether you are Mormon or not, and it's a great site. It has lots and lots of information starting with some research help over here, and how to get started in family research. It's building a huge family tree that you can connect yours to if you care to. And I think more importantly right now they have this prototype that they are working on, and gathering all sorts of records and images. So for example, I can just click on this particular hit that I set up already for this tutorial and take a look at this census record and here I am looking at the census record about a family member for free.

And I can download it or print it. No charge. And this is a huge thing and this is getting bigger and bigger by the day. This is still a prototype. It's still in beta, but it will soon be released to the public and you can research all kinds of things on here and not have to pay for all those images. Let's move on to one other major site. It's called worldvitalrecords.com. This was created by folks from ancestry.com. It does compete with ancestry.com, although it does not have the same scope as ancestry.com. GenealogyBank is one of the major newspaper archives.

And I recommend this as well as the website called NewspaperARCHIVE. Let me do a search here real quick on Jacob Hendershot. I have been kind of focusing on him here. Do the search on him and since he is kind of an ancient ancestor, he probably won't be in the newspapers here. But let me just show you what it looks like if you search on somebody. You get a little preview of the page and then you can click on it and it will show you the whole page and you can read the news about that particular person including obituaries, advertisements and business listings. Now we are going to move on to family trees and message boards and the big one there is RootsWeb.

RootsWeb has a couple of strong features. It's creating this huge family tree called the WorldConnect project. They have got more than 500 million names so far on file, trying to connect all this various trees together. And it's a great way to go to see if you can find your tree or information about your tree and connecting your tree to their tree. It also is a great way to share information using the surname list and you can use their site to track down other folks who are researching your surname. Let's move on to this site, OneGreatFamily. This is another site whether they are trying to put together a humongous tree, trying to connect people from one tree to the next.

They have a separate interface for how you can work with them. Let me show you how that looks. Here's a small tree that I uploaded to them and the little exclamation marks show where my tree connects with somebody else and if I click on that it will open up this interface and I click on Collaborate and it shows other folks connected to my tree, and I can simply email them. This particular fellow I emailed and his tree has more then 250,000 members in it. I have mentioned him in another tutorial video but just wanted to mention him again. He has amassed a huge database on the northeast part of the United States and has done a remarkable job, and I tracked him down via this site.

That's how I found him by seeing that connection of the little exclamation point and then tracking it down. The little lightning bolts show where someone else has got your family tree name but they have a little disagreement in terms of what they think the data should be, and you can look at those disagreements if you care to and see what the difference is. Here it's Annie, and here it's Anne. So you can see there are subtle differences sometimes. Okay, let's go back to the browser. myfamily.com is a place where you can share family information and photographs with other family members.

It too is owned by the folks that are on ancestry.com and it's just a good place to upload images and videos. You can find immigration records at two sites, or more than two but two in particular. Castle Garden is the main immigration center for the United States on the East Coast. It was the first immigration center before Ellis Island. It has a database on more than 12 million immigrants from the years 1820-1892. After 1892 Ellis Island took over and you can go here and search for folks on Ellis Island and see if they came through here and a lot a people did.

I have two library sites that I want to tell you about. WorldCat is the sort of card catalog for thousands of libraries around the world. So I am going to search on Hendershot genealogy. I will click this and there are books about the Hendershot genealogy. I am going to click on this particular one, Hendershot Ancestor Genealogy by William Hendershott. That takes us to this particular listing where it shows all the libraries that carry that book, and in particular it shows the Allen County Public Library. I just want to mention that because the Allen County Public Library in Ft. Wayne, Indiana of all places is one the greatest genealogy libraries in the world.

It pretty much competes directly with the Family History Library in Salt Lake City owned by the Mormon Church. This is a great place to go if you want to do genealogical research. Let's go to GWM, the Golden West Marketing listing of genealogy libraries in the US. It's just a good place to go if you want to track down a local library that has a good genealogy section. There are two sites they are related to cemeteries. interment.net lets you search cemetery records, as does Find A Grave. Let me just do this one for you. Search there, type in Charles Barg, and we will try Kansas, because I know that's where he lived, click on that, and we have got Charles Barg there and the little symbol there indicates that they are actually the picture of headstone.

There it is and it gives you also the picture of the gate to the cemetery. People go around and take photographs of this and send in the information to this site. That's the great way to get photographs of headstones and also cemeteries in general. Finally let's go to a major search site that I like to use, Google. And Google, there are some trick to searching Google. I have mentioned them before, but let me just give a quick run through on that. We will search for let's say Jacob Hendershot, just like that with no quotes and we get 529,000 hits for Jacob Hendershot.

That's probably a bit more than we need. So I am going to put quotes around that now, because it's finding every site that has the word Jacob on it, every site that has the word Hendershot on it, where they are on they are on the same site but they are not necessarily side by side on that site. So now I am going to click that again. Now that I put quotes around it, we are looking for the specific phrase Jacob Hendershot. Now we are down to 2670 sites and I will put in Jacob J Hendershot and see what happens there. And now we are down to two sites. So you can see you can narrow things down if you care to do it that way. Or since two is really narrow, I am going to put Jacob Hendershot Genealogy, and this gives you 590 sites where Jacob Hendershot is related somehow to genealogy research.

And this is really the way that you can hone in on your search on Google or other search sites, but as you recommend Google as the number one search site. So those are the major websites that I recommend you take a look at. I think every single one offers something of value to you.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Growing and Sharing Your Family Tree
Growing and Sharing Your Family Tree

43 video lessons · 6621 viewers

Jeff Sengstack
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 5m 52s
    1. Welcome
      1m 6s
    2. Why grow your family tree?
      1m 43s
    3. Workflow for growing and sharing a family tree
      1m 51s
    4. Using the exercise files
      1m 12s
  2. 39m 37s
    1. Installing Family Tree Maker
      1m 29s
    2. Introducing Family Tree Maker
      4m 38s
    3. Standardizing names, dates, and locations
      1m 59s
    4. Getting started with Family Tree Maker
      4m 50s
    5. Including source information
      3m 29s
    6. Adding more names: children, spouses, unrelated individuals, and parents
      6m 0s
    7. Inputting notes, facts, and media
      7m 36s
    8. Fine-tuning information
      5m 45s
    9. Viewing and printing simplified ancestor charts to identify gaps in knowledge
      3m 51s
  3. 16m 44s
    1. Going on a treasure hunt
      1m 20s
    2. Getting photos and documents onto your computer
      12m 12s
    3. Using DNA to trace your roots
      3m 12s
  4. 12m 56s
    1. Finding others who have researched your family tree
      5m 4s
    2. Importing family tree files
      5m 10s
    3. Talking to older relatives
      1m 1s
    4. Visiting ancestral locales
      1m 41s
  5. 24m 10s
    1. Leafing through Family Tree Maker's ancestry hints
      2m 44s
    2. Installing Family Tree Maker's viewer
      1m 34s
    3. Merging ancestry hint document data into your family tree
      12m 23s
    4. Saving documents and linking them to individuals
      7m 29s
  6. 24m 53s
    1. How the internet can help you
      3m 53s
    2. Drawing up an internet research strategy
      5m 28s
    3. Tips, tricks, and techniques for searching Ancestry.com
      7m 43s
    4. Reviewing the major internet genealogy sites
      7m 49s
  7. 48m 18s
    1. Associating place names with people and events
      8m 55s
    2. Adding, viewing, and linking images and media to people
      9m 41s
    3. Customizing and printing charts
      9m 34s
    4. Backing up, restoring, and exporting files
      5m 46s
    5. Setting the home person
      57s
    6. Finding relationships
      1m 19s
    7. Sorting children
      1m 1s
    8. Replacing terms
      1m 11s
    9. Making facts private
      2m 35s
    10. Moving data items
      1m 42s
    11. Reviewing data
      2m 7s
    12. Merging two trees
      3m 30s
  8. 7m 49s
    1. Creating family history audio recordings, videos, slideshows, and DVDs
      3m 43s
    2. Collaborating and sharing online
      4m 6s
  9. 2m 17s
    1. Goodbye
      2m 17s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Growing and Sharing Your Family Tree.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Your file was successfully uploaded.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.