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Creating lists

From: Excel 2003 Essential Training

Video: Creating lists

Microsoft Excel. Lists have for a long time been a very useful and powerful feature inside of Microsoft Excel, and in Excel 2003 lists have been further enhanced with designated lists. The difference between a traditional list and a designated list is subtle, but I think you'll find it useful nonetheless, Lists are something that I've used both personally and professionally. The example that we're going to look at here is something that leans towards the personal, but it'll be an excellent way for us to look at all the features of lists, understand how to use them and organize them, and it can be applied inside or outside of the office. Let's browse to our Student Files and we'll take a look at Chapter four. Let's open up the file called Movie List. Now here's a brief list of movies that may exist inside your collection, and as you can see each movie has three different categories to help describe the genre, and a year to help distinguish a movie that may have been remade. This short list of movies represents an easy list and to your eye we can look at it easily and say, that's a list. To Microsoft Excel it's just a collection of data, nothing unique about the spreadsheet is made it a list yet. When you're working with lists inside of Microsoft Excel it's very similar to working with a two dimensional database. For those of you who are familiar with databases, you'll recognize the terms record and field. Every row inside of this list is similar to a record. It completely describes the movie for our purposes. Every cell inside of a row could be considered a field. To clue in Microsoft Excel that this group of data is actually a list that we want to organize and sort and use to keep track of these movies, we have to perform some list function. We could simply define it as a list, but in Microsoft Excel 2003 that's going to jump straight into designated lists, and we want to save that for a little bit. So let's apply a Sort as our first action. First of all we need to select the entire range. Then we'll go up to our Data menu. The Data menu contains almost every feature that applies to lists within Microsoft Excel, and in this case I'm going to click Sort. The Sort dialog box that comes up, first of all allows us to define a Header row. You can see down here that we can either say I have a header or my titles, or I have no header. In this case we do so I'll leave that box checked. We can sort by Title, Category, 2nd Category, 3rd Category, or Year. In other words, any column within our list. For our key, for our primary information to be sorted, we're going to sort it alphabetically by title. To distinguish between one movie or another that may have the same title, we'll also sort by year. Let's click OK, and now you can see, let me just click away from that to deselect, and now you can see the entire list has been sorted alphabetically. All of the category information that was associated with each one of the titles has remained in that record. In other words, the movie Chicago still knows it's a Musical, Comedy, Drama and that it was published in the year 2002. That information has not gone out of alignment. In other words it's maintained the records of information, all five cells have been linked into one unit of data. When I originally created this list, I simply began typing information into Excel and organizing it column by column in a way that made sense to me visually. And as I said before, you and I can look at this and recognize it as a list very easily. Microsoft Excel however needed some clue, and now it has that clue. That we've sorted this area of the spreadsheet has clued in Microsoft Excel that this is a list and now we can perform other special functions. For example I may want to enter new data into this list by simply selecting the first available row and begin typing, but Microsoft Excel provides us with an even more convenient way of doing. If you go back up to your Data menu, you can click on the word Form, and as you can see we have a dialog that appears using the title data that we have, or the header row, to describe each field that we need to enter. Now I'm using more database terminology, but it really does apply to our lists. We can search through the information that we already have in our list. We can find next, Find Next and it will continue to move down our list describing each one of the movies that are currently there. We can also see how many movies we have in total in our list, and when we're ready to enter new data, we simply click New.

Creating lists

Microsoft Excel. Lists have for a long time been a very useful and powerful feature inside of Microsoft Excel, and in Excel 2003 lists have been further enhanced with designated lists. The difference between a traditional list and a designated list is subtle, but I think you'll find it useful nonetheless, Lists are something that I've used both personally and professionally. The example that we're going to look at here is something that leans towards the personal, but it'll be an excellent way for us to look at all the features of lists, understand how to use them and organize them, and it can be applied inside or outside of the office. Let's browse to our Student Files and we'll take a look at Chapter four. Let's open up the file called Movie List. Now here's a brief list of movies that may exist inside your collection, and as you can see each movie has three different categories to help describe the genre, and a year to help distinguish a movie that may have been remade. This short list of movies represents an easy list and to your eye we can look at it easily and say, that's a list. To Microsoft Excel it's just a collection of data, nothing unique about the spreadsheet is made it a list yet. When you're working with lists inside of Microsoft Excel it's very similar to working with a two dimensional database. For those of you who are familiar with databases, you'll recognize the terms record and field. Every row inside of this list is similar to a record. It completely describes the movie for our purposes. Every cell inside of a row could be considered a field. To clue in Microsoft Excel that this group of data is actually a list that we want to organize and sort and use to keep track of these movies, we have to perform some list function. We could simply define it as a list, but in Microsoft Excel 2003 that's going to jump straight into designated lists, and we want to save that for a little bit. So let's apply a Sort as our first action. First of all we need to select the entire range. Then we'll go up to our Data menu. The Data menu contains almost every feature that applies to lists within Microsoft Excel, and in this case I'm going to click Sort. The Sort dialog box that comes up, first of all allows us to define a Header row. You can see down here that we can either say I have a header or my titles, or I have no header. In this case we do so I'll leave that box checked. We can sort by Title, Category, 2nd Category, 3rd Category, or Year. In other words, any column within our list. For our key, for our primary information to be sorted, we're going to sort it alphabetically by title. To distinguish between one movie or another that may have the same title, we'll also sort by year. Let's click OK, and now you can see, let me just click away from that to deselect, and now you can see the entire list has been sorted alphabetically. All of the category information that was associated with each one of the titles has remained in that record. In other words, the movie Chicago still knows it's a Musical, Comedy, Drama and that it was published in the year 2002. That information has not gone out of alignment. In other words it's maintained the records of information, all five cells have been linked into one unit of data. When I originally created this list, I simply began typing information into Excel and organizing it column by column in a way that made sense to me visually. And as I said before, you and I can look at this and recognize it as a list very easily. Microsoft Excel however needed some clue, and now it has that clue. That we've sorted this area of the spreadsheet has clued in Microsoft Excel that this is a list and now we can perform other special functions. For example I may want to enter new data into this list by simply selecting the first available row and begin typing, but Microsoft Excel provides us with an even more convenient way of doing. If you go back up to your Data menu, you can click on the word Form, and as you can see we have a dialog that appears using the title data that we have, or the header row, to describe each field that we need to enter. Now I'm using more database terminology, but it really does apply to our lists. We can search through the information that we already have in our list. We can find next, Find Next and it will continue to move down our list describing each one of the movies that are currently there. We can also see how many movies we have in total in our list, and when we're ready to enter new data, we simply click New.

Let's type in something that's a little more current. And Category, all the categories that might describe this movie. Action, that definitely describes that movie, and the year that it was published. I'm going to go ahead and hit Enter, and I'm ready to enter another record into my list. You can already see that the record, we just entered has been added to list. I'm going to close that. Now I can select this again, go up to Data > Sort and it sorts that new record into position within our list.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Excel 2003 Essential Training
Excel 2003 Essential Training

65 video lessons · 51006 viewers

Mark Swift
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 16s
    1. Welcome
      16s
  2. 22m 44s
    1. Spreadsheet uses
      1m 59s
    2. Toolbars and menus
      8m 53s
    3. Moving around
      8m 1s
    4. Getting help
      3m 51s
  3. 18m 43s
    1. Opening new workbooks
      5m 13s
    2. Entering data
      6m 12s
    3. Commenting and saving
      7m 18s
  4. 17m 31s
    1. Opening worksheets
      1m 55s
    2. Add and delete worksheets
      2m 23s
    3. Insert and delete cells
      3m 46s
    4. Worksheet data
      9m 27s
  5. 36m 0s
    1. Width and height
      6m 7s
    2. Numeric formats
      6m 1s
    3. Alignment of data
      3m 43s
    4. Naming cells and ranges
      5m 48s
    5. Naming constants
      1m 52s
    6. Creating lists
      5m 48s
    7. Autofilter
      4m 13s
    8. Designated lists
      2m 28s
  6. 11m 19s
    1. Print options
      5m 51s
    2. Printing and hiding data
      1m 58s
    3. Headers and footers
      3m 30s
  7. 21m 52s
    1. Creating formulas
      6m 30s
    2. Relative and absolute
      6m 1s
    3. External references
      6m 0s
    4. Named constants
      3m 21s
  8. 7m 47s
    1. Functions
      7m 47s
  9. 19m 6s
    1. Fonts and merging
      3m 52s
    2. Rotate and indent
      1m 47s
    3. Borders
      2m 41s
    4. Shading and format painter
      2m 30s
    5. Rename and color worksheet tabs
      1m 52s
    6. Working with pictures
      6m 24s
  10. 11m 31s
    1. Templates
      3m 45s
    2. Styles
      3m 55s
    3. Autoformat
      55s
    4. Smart documents
      2m 56s
  11. 13m 15s
    1. Chart terminology
      2m 23s
    2. Chart wizard
      5m 10s
    3. Formatting charts
      3m 22s
    4. Inserting images
      1m 42s
    5. Printing charts
      38s
  12. 5m 1s
    1. File search
      1m 51s
    2. Find and replace
      3m 10s
  13. 8m 19s
    1. Import from Word
      1m 17s
    2. Delimited data
      2m 53s
    3. Import from the web
      1m 49s
    4. Exporting data
      2m 20s
  14. 7m 54s
    1. Consolidation
      5m 12s
    2. 3D formulas
      2m 42s
  15. 5m 33s
    1. Multiple panes
      1m 12s
    2. More screen options
      4m 21s
  16. 13m 37s
    1. If
      2m 22s
    2. Time
      4m 16s
    3. Date and time
      2m 14s
    4. Lookup
      4m 45s
  17. 6m 55s
    1. Compare text
      3m 27s
    2. Concatenation
      1m 47s
    3. Special characters
      1m 41s
  18. 6m 10s
    1. Pivot tables
      6m 10s
  19. 16m 0s
    1. Recording a macro
      8m 43s
    2. Macro menus
      3m 45s
    3. Global macros
      3m 32s
  20. 11s
    1. Goodbye
      11s

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