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Setting Up a Database in Excel 2010
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Expanding tables automatically and adding totals


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Setting Up a Database in Excel 2010

with Dennis Taylor

Video: Expanding tables automatically and adding totals

When you work with a Table you may need to add new records perhaps at the bottom of a table. You might want to add new columns to the right both of these will happen automatically you might even want to consider adding a total row. So let's take a look and see how these features work. In this particular list here I might want to add a record by inserting from within and you can usually right-click and Insert and add the data that way, if that seems appropriate, that's just fine. Excel will automatically include formulas where they exist in certain columns, so we could just fill in this data if we needed to, and then fill in this data.

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Setting Up a Database in Excel 2010
43m 27s Appropriate for all Oct 21, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, author Dennis Taylor shows how to use Excel for creating a simple database. The course explains the limits of Excel as a data management tool and spells out the design considerations for creating a database. It also demonstrates using tables to simplify database creation as well as the Form and Data Validation tools to manage data.

Topics include:
  • Understanding database design concepts
  • Using the Text to Columns feature
  • Creating fields
  • Using tables
  • Adding total fields
  • Formatting tables with the Design tab
  • Using the Form tool to build and view data
  • Using data validation to restrict data entries
Subjects:
Business Databases
Software:
Excel
Author:
Dennis Taylor

Expanding tables automatically and adding totals

When you work with a Table you may need to add new records perhaps at the bottom of a table. You might want to add new columns to the right both of these will happen automatically you might even want to consider adding a total row. So let's take a look and see how these features work. In this particular list here I might want to add a record by inserting from within and you can usually right-click and Insert and add the data that way, if that seems appropriate, that's just fine. Excel will automatically include formulas where they exist in certain columns, so we could just fill in this data if we needed to, and then fill in this data.

We don't need to worry about this formulas; that's one approach. I am going to undo that. We might want to go the bottom here and maybe I am going to start typing and look what's happening here, Smith, Marion, I'll tab over, you can begin to see based on the formatting changes, this is automatically part of the Table, and so that means if we do filtering, this row is automatically included in the filtering concept, if we do sorting, sorting is going to include all the rows down to row 743, and so on.

And as we're adding new data, it just so happens, once again, we've got formulas here that are automatically copied from above. So that's fast and easy. Take a look at another worksheet, this hasn't been converted into a Table, let's do so. Once again we could do this in a variety of ways, we'll use the Format as Table option on the Home tab, pick one of these choices here, and there we go, click OK, and what happens if we want to add a new field? For example, here it's going to be called Sales Type. Column doesn't have to so wide, we'll just type in Sales Type, and as soon as I press Enter, you can see what's happening; that column automatically becomes part of the Table, because it's adjacent to the data.

So we don't have to worry about expanding our Table, we don't have to take any special stuffs to do that, it becomes automatic. And based on the nature of the data, you might or might not want to have a Total row at the bottom. So on the Design tab as you're working with the table, you'll see a choice called Total row. Let me check this, and immediately we're pulled down to the bottom of the list here, you'll see the word Total. Now we might want totals for some of these columns, but not all of them. If we simply want to count the number of Sales, we could probably use any column, if each row here represents a sale.

So maybe we'll do it right here and I will leave that word Total out there by itself. And then say, for example, let's just do a count here, 909 sales, we wouldn't need that for here or here. We might want to put in the average Items sold per sale, something like that, possibly the Total instead. We might want a total amount. In other words in each of these various locations, we can put in the function that serves us best. Adjust the column there, so that's the Total dollar amount.

This is the average number of items per each row here. We could even put in the average Date, it probably wouldn't be a good calculation, but we've got our choices on all of these. But now the question comes up, what if you're saying yourself, well, I like to add when I add new data put it at the bottom, or let's turn off the Total row, and we'll add new data here. Make this a little bit simpler, I am just going to copy one of these and say its another repeat of this, so I'll just do a Ctrl+Drag here, start to fill in the other data, you see immediately it's part of the Table. Let's bring back a Total row; do we have to recreate all those totals all over again? No, we don't, and so if we think of the Total row as a toggle, we can easily add it and take it off as needed.

So it really isn't going to get into the way of the idea that we might want to add our new information at the bottom of the list, just turn off the Total row, add the records, bring back the Total row as needed. So that's a great feature, and once again, we can see how the Table concept allows us to think of our data as an entity, and it's easy to add new columns to the right, new rows at the bottom, simply by typing the information. And then there's an added benefit of using the Total row as we need it, using the toggle concept, it's on, or it's off, whenever we need it.

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