New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Creating multiple levels and copying subtotals

From: Managing and Analyzing Data in Excel 2010

Video: Creating multiple levels and copying subtotals

You can introduce additional layers of subtotals. In other words in the lists we are looking at here we might have major subtotals by department and have minor totals by status. If you look at the data for example for Admin Training here, recognize that this has been sorted secondarily by status. So let's introduce subtotals again, using the Subtotal command. Every time there's a change in Department Years and Salary Totals. Click OK. Our major levels are totally in place. Let's now introduce another layer.

Creating multiple levels and copying subtotals

You can introduce additional layers of subtotals. In other words in the lists we are looking at here we might have major subtotals by department and have minor totals by status. If you look at the data for example for Admin Training here, recognize that this has been sorted secondarily by status. So let's introduce subtotals again, using the Subtotal command. Every time there's a change in Department Years and Salary Totals. Click OK. Our major levels are totally in place. Let's now introduce another layer.

Back to the Subtotal command and now we would like to say every time there's a change in the status. So we are going to have a lot more subtotal lines and let's continue to add Years and Salaries. We do not want to replace current subtotals, so uncheck that box. Click OK. And now not only are we seeing multiple levels, for example here's the ADC department. Now because it's so small those totals don't quite stand out maybe as smoothly as we like, but it is accurate. We had a Contract total, a Full Time total of two people, half time for one, hourly for one.

A little more obvious here perhaps or little better looking maybe, as we look at the Admin Training group. There is the entire group there and we see initial subtotal in row 14 for contract people, another subtotal in row 25 for full-time, and so on. And notice also the outlining symbols on the left-hand side. We now have four of them. If I click for three, we now see both layers of Subtotals and the Grand Total at the bottom. We are not seeing any detail. Clicking the two will show us the major level of subtotals and if we had only one that's the way it would have looked anyway, one layer of subtotals.

And clicking the one again which show just the Grand Totals. So have got this ability again to expand and collapse at will. And a common issue here is sometimes people want to copy these totals. Now I am going to insert a new worksheet by pressing Shift+F11 just to the left here. It's a quick way to insert a new worksheet. Back to our data. What happens if we say let's copy this data? I'm going to highlight this data here. Possibly I could have hidden some rows ahead of time. I would like to copy this data just this.

So let's select it. I will right click and copy or Ctrl+C, either way. Go over to this empty sheet, right- click and paste, and what happens? All the hidden data, different rows. I am not going to worry about the column. Unless we have got way too much data here. That's not what you want probably. So there is a workaround on this. It does involve first of all possibly a keystroke shortcut, if you know it, or otherwise a rather obscure command. And let's imagine we are back here again. Let's say we are about to highlight the data and we do that.

Now what we'd like to do here is to copy just the data we are seeing and as I suggested bury it in the Excel command system on the Home tab and then the extreme right button, Find & Select. Nothing pops up out there, but there's a feature called Go To Special and in here's a choice called Visible cells only. Could you found that one? Click OK. And a slight screen difference on the display here. We are only highlighting right now the visible cells. If we use Copy now, right-click, Copy, Ctrl+C or Copy command, any of those, then perhaps the picture is a little clearer.

Typically when you copy a range you see these so-called marquee lights, some people call them marching ants, around the perimeter of a range, but in effect we have got a whole bunch of different ranges here that we are about the copy. We are not copying the hidden cells. So go over to the Sheet2 from before. I want to paste just to the right of the existing data and no paste special here. Just a regular paste, there we go. And we do not see the hidden rows here. We see just we wanted to see, the visible data only.

Now the keystroke shortcut and you might get used to it if you use this feature a lot, once again come back here and let's imagine we have just highlighted the data here, we are ready to copy it, but we want to make sure we are choosing the Visible cells only, keystroke shortcut Alt+Semicolon. Selects the visible cells only, instead of going to the Find & Select button and Go To Special and Visible Cells and all of that. Then we can do Ctrl+C for copy and go to the other location and paste. So its going to be handy at times. You don't need to worry about this in a filtered list, but in many-many other situations in Excel, anytime you're copying data and you've got hidden rows or hidden columns and you don't want to select that data, after first highlighting everything that you want to copy, press Alt+Semicolon before doing the copy.

So that situation will arise. There is another issue here. Let's go back to the top of the list and you might as you look at the data here. I want to go back and show the detail by clicking the 4 here. You might want to include a different account of information or how many people in each department. And this probably would show up a little bit better if we had only one level, but it should work here as well too and maybe we'd like to show a total here of employees. It's going to be more meaningful for example in a list like this. Now, there is no direct way to do this other than what I'm doing right now.

Go back to the Data tab, go to Subtotal. Every time there is a change in status. This time let's add another line called Count and we don't want to count the years of the salary. We want to count the employee name. We do not want to replace current subtotals, so we click OK. And there is Count setting out there sort of all by itself and here's the term Contract Count. I think for most people this is not a very appealing picture, but nevertheless we do have a total out there.

Now a rather complex workaround that you could use. I think that's the stuff perhaps of another course, but when you are trying to get different kinds of totals like a Count and a Sum, that's what total means here, trying to put together at the same time probably doesn't look real great. But nevertheless at least we were able to do that here, just by inserting a new row. In other words a new level of subtotals. So multiple level subtotals are definitely a need. I think what we just did here in the last example here may be not so commonly used, but a great feature when you no longer need the subtotals. Simply remove them, back to Subtotals, and Remove All.

Once you get familiar with working with subtotals the process of creating becomes pretty fast and pretty routine and so the idea of "well every time I use my data, do I have to create subtotals," well of course you don't, but it's an easy process. It doesn't take very long, it can be very fast and you can certainly do it with multiple layers pretty fast as well.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Managing and Analyzing Data in Excel 2010
Managing and Analyzing Data in Excel 2010

27 video lessons · 21870 viewers

Dennis Taylor
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 1m 32s
    1. Welcome
      54s
    2. Using the exercise files
      38s
  2. 25m 18s
    1. Sorting from the Sort menu
      4m 37s
    2. Sorting from the toolbar
      4m 2s
    3. Multi-key sorting
      3m 4s
    4. Sorting based on the order of data in custom lists
      4m 44s
    5. Sorting by color font, color background, or icon
      3m 57s
    6. Sorting columns
      2m 11s
    7. Sorting data in random order
      2m 43s
  3. 19m 1s
    1. Using single- and multiple-column text filtering
      5m 8s
    2. Taking a look at special numeric filters
      1m 54s
    3. Harnessing special date filters
      2m 5s
    4. Creating a top-ten list by value or percent
      3m 11s
    5. Creating custom filters
      1m 40s
    6. Copying and sorting filtered lists
      3m 7s
    7. Recognizing the limitations of standard filtering
      1m 56s
  4. 11m 16s
    1. Setting up subtotals
      4m 20s
    2. Creating multiple levels and copying subtotals
      6m 56s
  5. 13m 22s
    1. Using the Advanced Filter for complex OR criteria
      4m 30s
    2. Using the Advanced Filter for complex multiple-field criteria
      5m 37s
    3. Using the Advanced Filter to create unique lists from repeating field data
      3m 15s
  6. 10m 44s
    1. Using the Remove Duplicates command
      2m 30s
    2. Using a specialized array formula to identify data that's been duplicated
      5m 10s
    3. Using an array formula to count the number of unique items in a list
      3m 4s
  7. 10m 31s
    1. Using SUMIF, COUNTIF, and related functions for quick data analysis
      6m 48s
    2. Using database functions like DSUM, DAVERAGE, and DMAX
      3m 43s
  8. 34s
    1. Next steps
      34s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.