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Excel 2008 for Mac: Pivot Tables for Data Analysis

Consolidating data from multiple sources


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Excel 2008 for Mac: Pivot Tables for Data Analysis

with Curt Frye

Video: Consolidating data from multiple sources

Most of the time you will create a Pivot Table from a data list, but you can also summarize multiple data ranges using a Pivot Table if the data is formatted appropriately. To consolidate a series of data ranges into a Pivot Table, the ranges must be laid out in cross tabular format and have exactly the same structure. As an example, consider the worksheets that I have in my Consolidating.xlsx worksheet. On the SupportCalls worksheet, I have data reflecting the number of support calls received in the years 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 for the four regions North, South, East and West.

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Excel 2008 for Mac: Pivot Tables for Data Analysis
1h 6m Intermediate Sep 22, 2009

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In Excel 2008 for Mac: Pivot Tables for Data Analysis, Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Curt Frye helps dispel the common fear of the Pivot Table feature, demonstrating how to use this powerful tool to discover valuable business intelligence. Curt shows how to create Pivot Table reports from internal Excel data and outside data sources, use filters to focus on the most important data in the sheet, and prepare a Pivot Table report by applying formats and rules. Exercise files accompany this course.

Topics include:
  • Sorting across data sources to show relative importance Adding, removing, and positioning subtotals and grand totals Creating conditional formats to highlight subsets of data Using color scales to emphasize specific information Adding a trendline to a PivotChart report Updating and refreshing PivotTable data sources
Subjects:
Business Data Analysis
Software:
Excel Excel for Mac
Author:
Curt Frye

Consolidating data from multiple sources

Most of the time you will create a Pivot Table from a data list, but you can also summarize multiple data ranges using a Pivot Table if the data is formatted appropriately. To consolidate a series of data ranges into a Pivot Table, the ranges must be laid out in cross tabular format and have exactly the same structure. As an example, consider the worksheets that I have in my Consolidating.xlsx worksheet. On the SupportCalls worksheet, I have data reflecting the number of support calls received in the years 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 for the four regions North, South, East and West.

I have the same data for order calls on the OrderCalls worksheet. And I have the same data for return calls for product returns on the ReturnCalls worksheet. Please note that the Region and Year column and row identifiers occur within the same cell. The reason you need to do that when you are consolidating different ranges into a Pivot Table is that the data source must be a perfect rectangle. In other words, if I were to have region here and year here in C2, Excel would try to bring in data from B2 to F7 because it would include these two cells in the region, which would extend the definition all the way from B2 to F7.

So now that my data is laid out properly, I can bring it into a Pivot Table. To do that, I click Data>PivotTable Report. On the first page of the PivotTable Wizard I can select Multiple consolidation ranges. Click Next. On Step 2, I can decide how many page fields I want to create. Page fields are fields that you can use to filter your Pivot Table without changing its arrangement. In this case, I don't want to create any, so I will create the page fields I want.

I'll select that option and I'll click Next. Here on Step 2b of the wizard, I can select the ranges that I want to include in the Pivot Table. I'll just drag this a bit over to the side to uncover the entire data range that I'm going to be including. So now that I have the cursor here in the Range box, I can select the cells that I want to include, verify that they appear correctly in the Range box, and click Add. I can now do the same thing for my other two fields.

So I'll go to OrderCalls. Select that range. It's correct. Click Add. And then do the same thing on the SupportCalls worksheet. And Add. So I have the same ranges from OrderCalls, ReturnCalls, and SupportCalls. Now that they are on place, I can verify that I'm creating zero page fields, which is what I want. Click Next. Verify that I want to create the Pivot Table on a new sheet, and click Finish.

I'll increase the zoom, so you have a better look at the data. So now I have a Pivot Table. What's different about this Pivot Table is that I do not have the names of the fields that I want. So, for example, all I have are column and row, when, in fact, the row values are regions and the column values are years. To change that, I click the Row field header and then on the PivotTable toolbar, I can click PivotTable>Field Settings. Inside the PivotTable Field dialog box I can assign a new name to my field.

I'm looking in the rows and these are the regions, so I'll type Regions and OK, and the field name changes. I can do the same thing for the Column. Click the Column field header, PivotTable> Field Settings and I'll change that to Year. Unfortunately, you can't change the Value field name, so I'll leave it as it is. You probably won't create many Pivot Tables by consolidating multiple data ranges, but it's nice to know the capability is available if you're working with legacy workbooks that have data laid out in cross-tabular formats.

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