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Time Management Fundamentals
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Understanding "you time" vs. "work time"


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Time Management Fundamentals

with Dave Crenshaw

Video: Understanding "you time" vs. "work time"

The first step to creating a time budget is to understand the difference between you time and work time. Many of the problems that people experience with work-life balance, and time management in general, is that they make no clear distinction between the two. To simplify this principle, I'm going to give you a very clear definition of work time. Work time includes time spent working, of course, travel time to and from work, and time spent thinking about work while at home, or away from work.
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  1. 3m 31s
    1. Welcome
      51s
    2. Getting the most from this course
      2m 4s
    3. Using the handouts and exercise files
      36s
  2. 3m 35s
    1. Making a lasting change
      1m 44s
    2. Finding your personal motivation
      1m 51s
  3. 6m 16s
    1. Addressing the myth of multitasking
      3m 12s
    2. Understanding the consequences of multitasking
      3m 4s
  4. 7m 48s
    1. Understanding principle 1: Space
      2m 46s
    2. Understanding principle 2: Mind
      1m 47s
    3. Understanding principle 3: Time
      3m 15s
  5. 26m 17s
    1. Taking inventory of your gathering points
      2m 37s
    2. Narrowing your gathering points
      3m 46s
    3. Setting up an inbox gathering point
      2m 23s
    4. Working with a portable inbox
      2m 49s
    5. Getting the most from a notepad
      2m 35s
    6. Consolidating multiple email accounts
      2m 34s
    7. Consolidating multiple voicemail accounts
      2m 56s
    8. Establishing a wild card gathering point
      2m 47s
    9. Separating work and personal gathering points
      2m 21s
    10. Taking the next step toward controlling your space
      1m 29s
  6. 11m 24s
    1. Selecting your mind clearing options
      5m 13s
    2. Clearing your mind using mental triggers
      3m 23s
    3. Setting a mind-clearing schedule
      1m 54s
    4. Taking the next step toward keeping your mind clear
      54s
  7. 14m 2s
    1. Choosing the right calendar for you
      4m 4s
    2. Using your calendar effectively
      3m 55s
    3. Saying no to others
      3m 5s
    4. Saying no to yourself
      2m 58s
  8. 4m 21s
    1. Preparing for action
      4m 21s
  9. 14m 12s
    1. Preparing to gather
      2m 40s
    2. Gathering to your inbox: At your desk
      6m 30s
    3. Gathering to your inbox: Elsewhere
      3m 49s
    4. Dealing with full inboxes
      1m 13s
  10. 31m 2s
    1. Mastering the "what, when, where" processing system
      3m 11s
    2. Processing question 1: What is the next step?
      3m 22s
    3. Processing question 2: When will it be done?
      4m 33s
    4. Processing question 3: Where is its home?
      3m 49s
    5. Filing made simple
      4m 4s
    6. Processing your first inbox
      7m 27s
    7. Setting your processing schedule
      4m 36s
  11. 18m 31s
    1. Applying "what, when, where" processing to email
      1m 53s
    2. Setting up an email resource folder
      2m 58s
    3. Creating email rules or filters
      4m 14s
    4. Processing email
      5m 8s
    5. Processing email vs. checking email
      4m 18s
  12. 18m 1s
    1. Understanding "you time" vs. "work time"
      4m 9s
    2. Establishing "most valuable activities"
      2m 44s
    3. Identifying your most valuable activities
      3m 39s
    4. Budgeting time for your most valuable activities
      4m 11s
    5. Using your time budgeter
      3m 18s
  13. 1m 38s
    1. Maintaining your productivity gains
      1m 38s
  14. 3m 0s
    1. Dave Crenshaw on getting himself organized
      3m 0s

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Time Management Fundamentals
2h 43m Appropriate for all Mar 31, 2011 Updated Oct 19, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Effective time management is an indispensable skill. In Time Management Fundamentals, Dave Crenshaw explains how to sensibly allocate time in order to achieve greater productivity. Dave details a set of principles for staying organized, consolidating the workspace, keeping a clear mind, and developing a time budget. Also covered are techniques for managing a full inbox, processing email, and reserving time for the most important activities. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Understanding the principles of productivity
  • Avoiding the pitfalls of multitasking
  • Practicing mind-clearing techniques
  • Saying no with tact
  • Choosing the appropriate calendaring software
  • Mastering the What, When, Where processing system
  • Processing email vs. checking email
  • Maintaining productivity gains
Subjects:
Business Productivity Business Skills Time Management Leadership Management Education Student Tools Teacher Professional Development
Software:
Entourage Outlook Outlook for Mac Google Calendar
Author:
Dave Crenshaw

Understanding "you time" vs. "work time"

The first step to creating a time budget is to understand the difference between you time and work time. Many of the problems that people experience with work-life balance, and time management in general, is that they make no clear distinction between the two. To simplify this principle, I'm going to give you a very clear definition of work time. Work time includes time spent working, of course, travel time to and from work, and time spent thinking about work while at home, or away from work.

It's usually that last part of the definition, the time spent thinking about work, that really causes people to stop and think. Take a moment to write down an estimate of how many hours you believe you spend working in an average week. Use the definition I just gave you. Include travel time to and from work, and time spent thinking about work while at home. The reason why I ask you to include that in the definition is because of switching cost. If you're thinking about work while at home or somewhere else, that's work time because that's where your focus is.

I'll give you an example. I worked with a CEO and helped her estimate where she was spending her time. She accounted for approximately 190 hours of activity in a 168-hour total week, which of course is physically impossible. When we analyzed her time estimates, she realized that while every evening she thought she was spending time with her family, she was really spending time in the presence of her family doing stock research. In other words, she was working but not spending you time or family time.

So for the purposes of this discussion about time budget, anything related to work--whether you're doing work, thinking about work, whether you have multiple jobs, you're working on two businesses-- all of that together is considered work, and everything else is considered you time, including recreation time, sleep time, eating time, family time. That way we can keep the discussion clear between the two. Next, we need to establish a boundary line between work time and you time.

Many people, particularly those who are inherently very driven, adopt the attitude that they'll work until it gets done. They work however late is necessary to get their projects complete. They work late hours--8 o'clock, 9 o'clock, 10 o'clock, end of the evening-- believing that they're a hard worker and being more productive. The reality is that while you may be able to be successful, to a degree, working long hours, you can be even more successful and productive by stopping at a set time each day.

When you create a line in your day that says 'I will not cross this line between work time and you time', it forces you to be more creative with your time budget. It forces you to analyze your personal systems more and make wiser decisions about how you use the scarce resource of your time. Remember, time will always fill up space. If you allow too much time for things to take place, you'll automatically fill up that space. Rather than giving yourself a blank slate to an endless amount of time, give yourself a limited space, a budget to work with.

You'll find that you get just as much done, but faster. Right now, take a moment and look at your calendar and create that boundary line. Make a commitment of the time you're going to stop work and focus on you time. There is no right or wrong answer here, other than just do it. If you've been in the habit of working till 9 or 10 o'clock at night, try to create a line at perhaps 8:30. Or if you want to stop working on the weekends commit that weekends are off-limits, beginning at 5 o'clock on Friday.

Create that clear boundary line in your calendar and try to make a commitment to never cross that line again.

Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about Time Management Fundamentals.


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