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Viewing multiple photos

From: Photoshop Elements 11 Essentials: 02 Editing and Retouching Photos

Video: Viewing multiple photos

When you open multiple photos into the Expert edit workspace, by default you'll see just one of the photos at a time in a single document window, as we saw earlier in this chapter. But there will be times when you want to view multiple photos all at the same time, maybe to compare different exposures of the same scene or when you're making composites of multiple photos. When you do want to see multiple open photos at once, go down to the Layout button in the taskbar at the bottom of the Expert edit workspace, and click that button to see a menu of different layouts that you can choose from.

Viewing multiple photos

When you open multiple photos into the Expert edit workspace, by default you'll see just one of the photos at a time in a single document window, as we saw earlier in this chapter. But there will be times when you want to view multiple photos all at the same time, maybe to compare different exposures of the same scene or when you're making composites of multiple photos. When you do want to see multiple open photos at once, go down to the Layout button in the taskbar at the bottom of the Expert edit workspace, and click that button to see a menu of different layouts that you can choose from.

Each of these layout options displays multiple document windows in different tiled patterns, like this, or this, or this, or this. If you've got a lot of photos or if your photos are large, you won't be able to see the full photo when you tile them into multiple windows like this. One solution is to zoom out on all the photos, and the most efficient way to do that is to zoom out on one of the photos and then automatically match the other zoom levels.

If you look closely you can see that right now the document tab for this photo of trees is the active photo. It's a little bit brighter than the other document tabs. So I'm going to zoom out on the active photo by holding the Ctrl key and pressing the - symbol a couple of times. On a Mac you'll hold the Command key and press the - symbol. That zoomed me out to 50%, which is far enough for me to see this entire photo. Now if I want to zoom the other windows to the same percentage so that I can see all of this photo as well, then I'll go up to the Window menu, and down to Images, and I'll choose Match Zoom. And that takes all three windows to 50%.

If I want to take them all back to 100%, maybe to compare the sharpness among the photos, I use the shortcut to go to 100%, which is to double-click the Zoom Tool, and that takes the active photo to 100%. And then again I'll go to Window>Images>Match Zoom. Rather than try to view a lot of images or particularly big images in one of these fixed layouts, some people prefer to view each photo in a separate floating window. One advantage is that floating windows can be freely moved around the screen. Another advantage of floating windows over tiled layouts is that you can more easily drag layered content between floating windows when you're making a composite.

To use floating windows, you need to turn on a preference in the editor's General preferences. The preferences on Windows are located under the Edit menu. On a Mac, they are located under the Adobe Photoshop Elements menu up here in the menu bar. I'll go down and choose Preferences>General. And in the Preferences dialog box. I go to this option, Allow Floating Documents in Expert Mode, and I'll check that option and then I'll click OK. Now I can take any one of these documents, click on its tab, and drag to move it out of the fixed layout and into a separate floating window like this.

I can click-and-drag on the title bar of this window and move it wherever I want on my screen. If I want to put all of the open documents into separate floating windows, I'll go down to the Layout menu and here I have a new option that wasn't available before I enabled that preference, All Floating. I'll click on that and now I have three separate floating windows and I can click on the title bar of any one of those and move it wherever I want on the screen. I can even create multiple tabbed documents within one of the floating windows, by clicking the title bar of one of my floating documents and dragging it into another. And then when I see that blue highlight around the inside border, I'll release my mouse, and I'm starting to build a new tabbed document within this floating window.

This could be a useful way to organize a lot of open documents at once. Finally, if I want to return all the open photos to a single window with tabbed documents, which is the default view with which we started this video, I'll go down to the Layout menu and I'll choose Default.

Show transcript

This video is part of

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  1. 6m 14s
    1. Welcome
      1m 10s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 30s
    3. Overview of the editing workspaces
      3m 34s
  2. 43m 14s
    1. Touring the interface
      4m 21s
    2. Making the most of the tools in Elements
      4m 6s
    3. Arranging the panels
      4m 32s
    4. Zooming and panning
      4m 3s
    5. Viewing multiple photos
      3m 51s
    6. Undoing
      5m 15s
    7. Cropping
      3m 46s
    8. Resizing
      7m 18s
    9. Saving images and examining formats
      6m 2s
  3. 19m 23s
    1. Understanding layers
      7m 59s
    2. Managing layers in the Layers panel
      4m 33s
    3. Creating new layers
      6m 51s
  4. 38m 28s
    1. Why use selections?
      4m 20s
    2. Selecting with the marquee tools
      3m 56s
    3. Selecting with the lasso tools
      6m 40s
    4. Selecting by color and tone
      6m 22s
    5. Refining a selection
      4m 51s
    6. Selecting hair
      5m 42s
    7. Hiding content with a layer mask
      6m 37s
  5. 46m 54s
    1. Why use adjustment layers?
      5m 15s
    2. Adjusting color with a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer
      4m 32s
    3. Correcting lighting with a Levels adjustment layer
      3m 32s
    4. Adjusting part of an image with an adjustment layer
      5m 19s
    5. Exploring auto adjustments
      3m 55s
    6. Improving shadows and highlights
      2m 14s
    7. Removing a color cast
      1m 47s
    8. Fine-tuning with Color Curves
      3m 16s
    9. Converting to black and white
      2m 26s
    10. Correcting camera distortion
      5m 32s
    11. Reducing noise
      2m 56s
    12. Sharpening
      6m 10s
  6. 20m 51s
    1. Creating a panorama
      5m 6s
    2. Merging bracketed exposures
      6m 0s
    3. Removing people from a scene
      5m 25s
    4. Combining group shots
      4m 20s
  7. 29m 24s
    1. Removing blemishes
      3m 42s
    2. Reducing wrinkles and circles
      4m 16s
    3. Enhancing eyes
      5m 19s
    4. Removing red-eye
      3m 15s
    5. Adjusting skin tone
      2m 21s
    6. Removing dust spots
      4m 7s
    7. Removing content
      6m 24s
  8. 52m 36s
    1. What is Camera Raw?
      5m 18s
    2. Using the latest Camera Raw controls
      3m 16s
    3. Camera Raw basics
      6m 22s
    4. Making use of the histogram
      3m 45s
    5. Setting white balance
      3m 44s
    6. Adjusting lighting
      4m 28s
    7. Adjusting color saturation
      2m 9s
    8. Cropping and straightening
      3m 58s
    9. Reducing noise
      3m 33s
    10. Sharpening
      3m 38s
    11. Synchronizing edits to multiple photos
      3m 36s
    12. Outputting from Camera Raw
      6m 14s
    13. Using Camera Raw with JPEGs
      2m 35s
  9. 48s
    1. Next steps
      48s

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