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Saving files

From: Photoshop Elements 7 for Windows Essential Training

Video: Saving files

Knowing how to save a file is a fundamental skill of working with Photoshop Elements' Editor and the important message that I have for you in this movie is to please save your files early and often. I'm working here with orchid_save.jpg from the 11 Save subfolder of the Chapter 6 Exercise Files folder. I'm going to save this file by going to the File menu at the top of the screen and choosing Save As. Because I haven't save this file before, the Save option here is grayed out, not available to me. The next time I save this file, it will be available.

Saving files

Knowing how to save a file is a fundamental skill of working with Photoshop Elements' Editor and the important message that I have for you in this movie is to please save your files early and often. I'm working here with orchid_save.jpg from the 11 Save subfolder of the Chapter 6 Exercise Files folder. I'm going to save this file by going to the File menu at the top of the screen and choosing Save As. Because I haven't save this file before, the Save option here is grayed out, not available to me. The next time I save this file, it will be available.

In the Save As dialog box, notice that the name of the original file orchid_save is here, but in the File Name field there is a different name, orchid_save_edited-1.jpg. That's because Save In Version Set With Original is checked in this dialog box. What does that mean? Elements has this great feature that keeps you from inadvertently saving over your files. As long as this box is checked in one of the Save dialog boxes, Elements will save a copy of the file with a different name so that the original file remains pristine and doesn't get saved over.

If I uncheck this, watch what happens to the file name in the File Name field. It changes back to the original name and so if were to click Save right now, I would save over my original image and that's often not what you want to do, but you can do that if you want. So, I'm going to click Save In Version Set With Original and I'm also going to leave Include In The Organizer checked. That's because I have cataloged all my images in the Organizer and with this checked, when I save orchid_save_edited-1.jpg, that file will also be cataloged for me in the Organizer, and we'll go back and see that after we save the file.

There is no reason to save this file as a copy because we are already saving it with the new name in a version set. Here in the Color field, I have a choice of whether to include the ICC Profile. What does that mean? The ICC Profile is part of the color management system that is designed to help make the image that you see on your screen when you are editing in Elements match the colors in the image that gets finally outputted either to print more online or to wherever you are outputting your file. I covered color management in an earlier movie on color settings and you might want to take another look at that movie to learn more about color management.

I'm going to leave this checked for now because I'm going to be preparing this file for print. So, it's important to have the profile with it. If I'm preparing a file for the web, I often do not include the ICC Profile because many web browsers cannot read this profile anyway and it would make the file slightly bigger and when you are making images for the web, it's good to have them as small as possible. Let's take a look at the Format field here. This file originally came out of my camera as a JPEG, which is a typical format for digital photo capture. JPEG is a lossy file format, which means that when you save as JPEG, the file gets compressed and data in the file actually gets thrown away to make the file smaller. So, if Save In Version Set With Original is not checked, you should be careful about saving as JPEG because each time you do so, you throw away a little more file information. As long as Save In Version Set With Original is checked, this will be the first copy of this JPEG called edited-1, so it's fine.

I'm going to click here to show you that there are lots of other formats to choose from. Photoshop is the native file format and I'll often save a master copy of an image I'm working on as a Photoshop document. Especially, if I have used special effects because that will preserve all the special effects and all of the layers and all of the other features available in Elements in my file. There are lots of other possible formats here, but most of those don't come into play very often. A couple more to draw your attention to are the PNG format, which is often used for saving files that are graphic type files for the web.

So, if you do make something like a button for a website or a logo for a website, you might save it as PNG and TIFF which is often used in the professional print world. So, if you are ever making something that might get printed at a professional printer, say a brochure, you might save that as a TIFF. But, we are going to be saving this as JPEG and I'm going to just click Save now. This message explains about Version Sets and reminds you that you are saving with a Version Set. I'm going to click OK and because this is being saved as a JPEG, I have another dialog box. In this dialog box, I can set the quality of the file. The higher the quality, the better the file might look but also the larger it would be.

In most cases, I'll put the Quality to somewhere between 8 and 10 and I'm going to leave all the other options at their defaults and click OK. Now I'm going to close this image. The easy way to close an image in Elements is to click the X on the document window and then I'm going back to the Organizer by clicking the Organizer button at the top right of the screen. Here, we see the Version Set that contains the original orchid_save image and the edited version that I just saved. I know there is a Version Set here because of this icon and because there is a gray box around the image with an arrow here. If I click this arrow, the Version Set expands and I can see both of the images in it. The original here on the right and the edited version on the left. If I click the arrow again, I close the Version Set. So, when you save in a Version Set, all the saved copies of an edited file will be saved together on top of one another in your Version Set in the Organizer.

If you right-click on this file, and you go to Version Set, you have some menu choices. Expand Items In Version Set does exactly what I just did by clicking the arrow on the right side of the gray box. Convert Version Set To Individual Items will take both files out of the Version Set and put them in the Organizer as regular files and there won't be a Version Set any longer. Revert To Original is you want to be careful of because what it will do is get rid of the edited version of the file and simply keep the original version in the Organizer.

Another one to be careful of is Flatten Version Set. What that will do is delete from the Organizer all but the top image that's showing in the Version Set and you can switch which image is a top image from the Set As Top Item menu choice. So, please do remember to save your images often as you work on them and take advantage of the built-in Version Set feature to keep your original safe.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Photoshop Elements 7 for Windows Essential Training
Photoshop Elements 7 for Windows Essential Training

94 video lessons · 9037 viewers

Jan Kabili
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 9m 23s
    1. Welcome
      54s
    2. What is Photoshop Elements?
      6m 59s
    3. Using the example files
      1m 30s
  2. 22m 34s
    1. Understanding the Organizer's catalog system
      3m 17s
    2. Getting photos from files and folders
      5m 41s
    3. Getting photos from a digital camera
      7m 27s
    4. Getting photos from offline media
      3m 7s
    5. Getting photos from a scanner
      3m 2s
  3. 35m 0s
    1. Touring the Organizer interface
      5m 30s
    2. Viewing photos
      2m 19s
    3. Selecting photos
      1m 52s
    4. Rotating photos
      2m 7s
    5. Renaming photos
      1m 57s
    6. Fixing photo dates
      1m 56s
    7. Hiding and deleting photos
      4m 50s
    8. Stacking photos
      7m 33s
    9. Moving files
      4m 1s
    10. Backing up
      2m 55s
  4. 31m 50s
    1. Tagging photos
      8m 38s
    2. Finding photos by tags
      3m 57s
    3. Tagging face photos
      3m 1s
    4. Using albums and Smart Albums
      7m 43s
    5. Finding photos with Text Search
      3m 34s
    6. Finding photos from the Find menu
      2m 57s
    7. Finding photos in the Timeline
      2m 0s
  5. 16m 27s
    1. Reviewing photos in Full Screen view
      5m 28s
    2. Comparing photos
      4m 9s
    3. Using Date view
      2m 54s
    4. Using Map view
      3m 56s
  6. 33m 3s
    1. Automatically fixing photos in the Organizer
      7m 58s
    2. Semi-automatically fixing photos with Quick Fix
      10m 39s
    3. Using the Guided Edit mode
      4m 33s
    4. Fixing group shots automatically
      3m 44s
    5. Removing stray content with the Scene Cleaner
      6m 9s
  7. 57m 41s
    1. Touring the Full Edit interface
      4m 46s
    2. Opening a file
      2m 6s
    3. Creating a blank file
      4m 36s
    4. Using tools
      8m 5s
    5. Setting Edit preferences
      4m 31s
    6. Adjusting Color settings
      5m 18s
    7. Using the Undo History command
      3m 48s
    8. Zooming and navigating
      6m 7s
    9. Resizing photos and adjusting resolution
      8m 23s
    10. Enlarging the canvas
      3m 24s
    11. Saving files
      6m 37s
  8. 13m 36s
    1. Understanding layers
      4m 38s
    2. Working in the Layers palette
      4m 4s
    3. Using layer masks
      4m 54s
  9. 17m 50s
    1. Understanding selections
      1m 15s
    2. Manual selection tools
      6m 20s
    3. Automatic selection tools
      6m 25s
    4. Modifying and saving selections
      3m 50s
  10. 40m 53s
    1. Straightening and cropping
      2m 46s
    2. Using the Shadow/Highlight adjustment
      2m 41s
    3. Adjusting with Levels
      5m 0s
    4. Adjusting with Hue/Saturation
      3m 14s
    5. Using Color Curves
      4m 44s
    6. Removing a color cast
      4m 9s
    7. Correcting skin tone
      2m 20s
    8. Reducing digital noise
      2m 47s
    9. Sharpening photos
      6m 27s
    10. Editing raw photos
      6m 45s
  11. 25m 21s
    1. Using the new Smart Brush tool
      5m 50s
    2. Using the Smart Brush Detail tool
      3m 13s
    3. Dodging and burning
      1m 58s
    4. Healing wrinkles and blemishes
      3m 51s
    5. Removing content
      2m 9s
    6. Using the Red Eye tool
      1m 11s
    7. Using the Whiten Teeth tool
      1m 48s
    8. Using the Blue Skies Tool
      1m 28s
    9. Using the Black/White tool
      1m 13s
    10. Converting color to black and white
      2m 40s
  12. 22m 10s
    1. Applying filters
      6m 21s
    2. Applying effects
      3m 53s
    3. Using layer styles
      5m 13s
    4. Using shapes
      4m 49s
    5. Using the Cookie Cutter tool
      1m 54s
  13. 7m 34s
    1. Creating text
      4m 6s
    2. Editing text
      1m 58s
    3. Warping text
      1m 30s
  14. 38m 38s
    1. Making a photo book
      10m 0s
    2. Making a photo collage
      8m 10s
    3. Creating a slideshow
      10m 11s
    4. Making a panorama
      3m 50s
    5. Preparing images for the web
      4m 6s
    6. Using automated actions
      2m 21s
  15. 9m 50s
    1. Using email and Photo Mail
      4m 42s
    2. Printing your photos
      2m 55s
    3. Using Quick Share
      2m 13s
  16. 19m 17s
    1. Signing up for Photoshop.com
      3m 33s
    2. Viewing and sharing your photos online
      6m 0s
    3. Backing up and synchronizing albums online
      6m 28s
    4. Accessing ongoing inspiration from Adobe.com
      3m 16s
  17. 36s
    1. Goodbye
      36s

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