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Resizing images

From: Photoshop Elements 6 for Mac Essential Training

Video: Resizing images

The resolution value of an image ultimately affects its output quality. Therefore you must take special care when resizing images for either print or on screen web display. With this movie, I would like to show you how to resize an image properly by changing the settings in the Image Size dialog box. I'm currently in the Bridge application and in the Content panel, I'm viewing the thumbnails for the images in the catalog images folder in our exercise files and I would like to locate a specific image to open up inside of the Elements' Editing workspace. I'm going to do that by going under the Edit menu, choosing Find. Brings up the Find dialog box and in here where it says Filename Contains for our criteria, I'm going to actually type in the word Tree and then click the Find button. And that brings up all the images that have the word Tree in their file name.

Resizing images

The resolution value of an image ultimately affects its output quality. Therefore you must take special care when resizing images for either print or on screen web display. With this movie, I would like to show you how to resize an image properly by changing the settings in the Image Size dialog box. I'm currently in the Bridge application and in the Content panel, I'm viewing the thumbnails for the images in the catalog images folder in our exercise files and I would like to locate a specific image to open up inside of the Elements' Editing workspace. I'm going to do that by going under the Edit menu, choosing Find. Brings up the Find dialog box and in here where it says Filename Contains for our criteria, I'm going to actually type in the word Tree and then click the Find button. And that brings up all the images that have the word Tree in their file name.

So the image that I would like to work with is this one right here, tree_03.jpg. I'm going to go ahead and click on that to select it, and notice over here on the right in the Metadata panel in Bridge, we can look down where it says Dimensions in Inches, 36 x 54, and then its Resolution value, which is 72 ppi. So right here in Bridge, we can identify the resolution of the image and its dimensions. So we know that's a pretty large image and saved at 72 ppi, Pixels Per Inch. So that's useful information. We already know what we're working with.

Let's go ahead and double-click on the image in order to open it up inside of the Elements' Editing workspace. So now that we have the image opened, what I would like to do is actually downsize this image because we don't want to print it at 36 x 54. But I'm not really sure how large of a print I can get and still maintain high resolution output. It says 72 ppi at 36 x 54. So if we do the math, that means if we actually print this much smaller like say, 4 x 6 or something like that, we should be fine. We've got plenty of room to work with here. However, we're not really sure how much unless we calculate it.

So let's do that using the Image Size dialog box. I'm going to go under the Image menu, and choose Resize and then Image Size. That brings up this dialog box here. All right, now this dialog box has broken up into sections. At the top here we can see the file size of the image. This image is 28.8 MB so it's rather large. That's the first thing we can indicate here. We have the pixel amounts up here, 2592 pixels in width, by 3888 pixels in height. Down at the bottom, and here we can see the document size and this has to do with printing.

So this is the area I really want you to focus on. We're also going to take a look up here as we make some changes. All right, we know that the resolution value is 72 ppi and generally that's what you would want your image to be saved at, if you're going to display it on the web or an email, any kind of on screen display, but not necessarily good for printing. But the image is huge, which means that if we were to lower this value, we should still be okay, as far as printing is concerned. Well, we don't know how far we can go or how large of a print we can get. So let's find out. To do that, we're going to uncheck the option here, where it says Resample image, click in that check box to turn that off. And then what I would like you to do is, hover over here where it says 72 resolution and let's bring that up to high resolution value. Standard high resolution is 300 and now we can see that these numbers have changed. It's done the math for us. So that means we can get an 8.64 x 12.96 print of this image and maintain high resolution output.

Okay. That is large as we can print this file and get a good print of it. So that's useful information. It's important to understand this concept. I'm going to go ahead and turn on the Resample Image check box again. Now that I know what we're working with, notice that these numbers didn't change, but if we were to change the numbers now in here with this turned on, Resample Image, and make it smaller, let's say we want to print this only at say 4 x 6. We will type in 4 and it automatically defaults to 6.

Now, take a look at what happened to our pixel dimensions. File size is now 6.18 MB as opposed to 28, and the pixels have been reduced, 1200 x 1800. So what we have done is reduced the number of pixels and the dimensions in our image. So we have properly resized this now to be a high resolution image when it's printed at 4 x 6 or smaller. All right, so now the last step is whenever you're reducing the file and size using the Image Size dialog box, you want to choose Bicubic Sharper here.

All right. Then we will click OK. We have now reduced the file size, we made it 4 x 6 at 300 ppi and we know that we can get a high quality print at 4 x 6 of this image. The last thing I would do is maybe do a Save As of this image. File > Save As. So that we're not saving over the original and maybe save as tree_03 and then do something like 4x6_highres. Something like that. Save it in here in your catalog images, choose for if you're staying at JPEG, I will choose the highest quality possible here and then click OK.

All right, and now we can go ahead and print this image. Either send it to a printing service or print it out on our inkjet printer, we're all set to go. That's a great way to work when you're resizing images for a specific print size and ensuring that you're going to maintain high resolution output. Now if we wanted to save this for the web, we would have to do this again. Let's go ahead and zoom in on the image a little bit more. We don't have to be zoomed out like that; it does it automatically when you reduce it in the Image Size dialog box. Let's bring that dialog box up again. This time Command+Option+I to bring up that dialog box. It's a great keyboard shortcut to memorize. All right, so here we are again. If we wanted to bring this down for web display, what I would do is just hover over in here and type in 72. And all we're doing is reducing the amount of pixels, but maintaining the dimensions. Notice what happened to the file size, and this is what's really important. It's now 364.5 K as opposed to 6.18 MB.

Now you want your file size to be really small when you're saving for the web because that ultimately is going to determine how fast your image is going to download into a browser. The smaller, the better. We have got the standard value of 72 in here, maintaining the dimensions but reducing the amount of pixels. All right, click OK, and now do another Save As. File > Save As, and this time we will say lowres and save it in here. Click OK.

All right, so now we have created a 4 x 6 print version of the image, and a 4 x 6 web version of the image and we have done so using the settings inside of the Image Size dialog box.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Photoshop Elements 6 for Mac Essential Training
Photoshop Elements 6 for Mac Essential Training

84 video lessons · 5391 viewers

Ted LoCascio
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 22s
    1. Welcome
      1m 2s
    2. Using the example files
      1m 20s
  2. 12m 1s
    1. Understanding Photoshop Elements
      2m 10s
    2. Using the Welcome screen
      2m 33s
    3. Importing photos from a digital camera
      7m 18s
  3. 1h 1m
    1. Viewing and selecting images
      2m 1s
    2. Creating and saving a custom workspace
      5m 29s
    3. Rotating images in Bridge
      3m 20s
    4. Renaming images in Bridge
      5m 34s
    5. Adding keywords to images
      7m 38s
    6. Applying ratings to images
      5m 17s
    7. Labeling images
      5m 17s
    8. Searching for images
      6m 38s
    9. Creating Collections
      2m 50s
    10. Sorting images with the Filter panel
      6m 36s
    11. Using image stacks
      7m 2s
    12. Hiding images
      4m 6s
  4. 31m 55s
    1. Opening images from Bridge
      2m 24s
    2. Working with palettes and the Palette Bin
      4m 53s
    3. Using the Project Bin
      6m 44s
    4. Zooming and scrolling
      8m 1s
    5. Fixing mistakes with Undo and Redo
      5m 3s
    6. Saving versions
      4m 50s
  5. 49m 38s
    1. Opening and viewing images in the Quick Fix mode
      6m 8s
    2. Understanding Auto Color and making tonal adjustments
      8m 50s
    3. Using the Lighting sliders
      5m 19s
    4. Using the Color sliders
      7m 1s
    5. Applying Auto Red Eye Fix
      3m 31s
    6. Applying Auto Sharpen
      4m 25s
    7. Using the Guided Edit mode
      6m 19s
    8. Processing multiple files
      8m 5s
  6. 10m 22s
    1. Understanding image resolution
      3m 23s
    2. Resizing images
      6m 59s
  7. 17m 8s
    1. Applying Auto Crop and Auto Straighten
      6m 22s
    2. Using the Straighten and Crop tools
      4m 10s
    3. Changing the canvas size
      6m 36s
  8. 30m 32s
    1. Why make selections?
      6m 3s
    2. Using the Quick Selection tool
      8m 37s
    3. Using Refine Edge
      7m 15s
    4. Saving and loading selections
      8m 37s
  9. 25m 58s
    1. Working with the Layers palette
      9m 45s
    2. Using adjustment layers and masks
      8m 37s
    3. Applying transparency and blend mode adjustments
      7m 36s
  10. 40m 56s
    1. Removing a color cast
      5m 53s
    2. Correcting skin tone
      3m 38s
    3. Enhancing color with Hue/Saturation adjustments
      6m 37s
    4. Balancing contrast and color with Levels adjustments
      7m 10s
    5. Correcting dark or light areas with Shadow/Highlight Adjustments
      5m 17s
    6. Improving images with Color Curves adjustments
      5m 55s
    7. Converting color images to black and white
      6m 26s
  11. 54m 14s
    1. Using the Red-Eye Removal tool
      8m 1s
    2. Using the healing tools
      7m 42s
    3. Whitening teeth and eyes
      6m 20s
    4. Cloning to remove contents
      8m 14s
    5. Adjusting perspective and correcting camera distortion
      6m 10s
    6. Using Photomerge Group Shot
      6m 17s
    7. Using Photomerge Faces
      6m 4s
    8. Using Photomerge Panorama
      5m 26s
  12. 16m 1s
    1. Creating a clipping mask
      7m 25s
    2. Creating collages with gradient blending
      8m 36s
  13. 22m 15s
    1. Reducing noise
      8m 7s
    2. Sharpening with Unsharp Mask
      7m 16s
    3. Sharpening with Adjust Sharpness
      6m 52s
  14. 17m 54s
    1. Understanding Camera Raw
      1m 46s
    2. Opening Camera Raw images from Bridge
      6m 37s
    3. Applying tonal and color adjustments in Camera Raw
      6m 23s
    4. Saving raw images
      3m 8s
  15. 40m 41s
    1. Painting with the Filter Gallery
      8m 7s
    2. Creating a pencil sketch
      7m 40s
    3. Customizing images
      7m 59s
    4. Adding artwork with the Content palette
      9m 39s
    5. Building and saving a multi-page photo creation
      7m 16s
  16. 37m 5s
    1. Creating a slideshow
      6m 58s
    2. Creating a photo book
      9m 1s
    3. Creating a photo collage
      6m 58s
    4. Creating a greeting card
      6m 31s
    5. Creating a web photo gallery
      7m 37s
  17. 31m 6s
    1. Choosing color settings
      7m 1s
    2. Printing to an inkjet printer
      8m 13s
    3. Using Picture Package
      4m 33s
    4. Saving for the web
      5m 55s
    5. Attaching images to emails
      3m 6s
    6. Burning to CDs and DVDs
      2m 18s
  18. 56s
    1. Goodbye
      56s

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