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Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 12

Keyword tagging


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Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 12

with Jan Kabili

Video: Keyword tagging

Keyword tagging is a powerful way to categorize photos by multiple subjects, making a particular photo easier to find later. If you're consistent about keyword tagging all your photos, you'll have a great setup for putting your finger on just the photo you're looking for among the many photos in your organizer. Keyword tagging is done in the Tags panel, here in the media view of the organizer. To open the Tags panel, I'll go down to the Task pane at the bottom of the screen, and I'll click the Tags Info button at the far right of the Task pane. And then, in the panel bin on the right, if the Tags panel isn't already showing, then I'll click Tags at the top of that column.

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Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 12
2h 5m Beginner Sep 25, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Join photographer and teacher Jan Kabili as she introduces the photo organizing, editing, and sharing features of Adobe Photoshop Elements 12. This course begins with a look at Elements Organizer, a workspace that makes it easier than ever to import photos. Next, Jan explores the photo-enhancement features in the Quick Edit workspace, from correcting color and lighting to quick retouching. Then graduate to the Expert Edit view, which provides tools for selecting portions of images, compositing multiple images, straightening crooked photos, and more. Last, Jan returns to the Organizer to show you how to tag photos with keywords and create albums, and introduces Elements 12's features for emailing photos and sharing them on Twitter.

Topics include:
  • Importing photos from a hard drive or camera
  • One-click editing with Instant Fix
  • Making Quick Edits to color and lighting
  • Adding effects in Quick Edit
  • Straightening with content-aware fill
  • Retouching
  • Working with folders and files in the Organizer
  • Keyword tagging
  • Making albums
  • Sharing photos via email or social media
Subject:
Photography
Software:
Photoshop Elements Elements
Author:
Jan Kabili

Keyword tagging

Keyword tagging is a powerful way to categorize photos by multiple subjects, making a particular photo easier to find later. If you're consistent about keyword tagging all your photos, you'll have a great setup for putting your finger on just the photo you're looking for among the many photos in your organizer. Keyword tagging is done in the Tags panel, here in the media view of the organizer. To open the Tags panel, I'll go down to the Task pane at the bottom of the screen, and I'll click the Tags Info button at the far right of the Task pane. And then, in the panel bin on the right, if the Tags panel isn't already showing, then I'll click Tags at the top of that column.

We're going to be working in the key word tag section of the Tags panel. So I'm clicking the arrow to the left of keywords, and here you can see some default categories of keywords that come with elements. You don't have to use these, they're just suggestions about the the types of keywords that you might create and apply to your photos. But you'll need to come up with keyword tags that are useful for the kinds of photos that you take, and that are meaningful to you. To create a keyword tag, I'll go to the plus symbol to the right of the keywords heading in the Tags panel and I'll click the arrow there.

And from the Drop-down menu, I'll choose to make a new keyword tag. In the create keyword tag window that opens, I'll give my keyword tag a name. Now, I want to make the keyword tag food, so I'll go to the name field in this Create Keyword Tag panel and I'll type food. Then I'll go to the Category menu, and here I have to specify a category into which to put this tag in the Keywords panel. And this is just a way of organizing the keyword tags so that the list can get too long. If there isn't already a category that works for my keyword tag food, I'll just put it in the default other category, and click OK.

And now over in the Keyword Tag panel, notice that under Other, is the keyword tag food. And before I show you how to apply keyword tags, let's just make a couple of other ones. I'll go to the Plus symbol again. I'll choose New Keyword Tag. I'll choose the category. I'll use Photography. And I'm going to make a keyword tag for square format. A keyword tag can be more than one word, like this. And I'll click OK. And now in the photography category, you can see that keyword tag.

Let's make one more keyword tag in the photography category. I don't have to go up to the plus symbol. I can just right-click the category name and choose Create New Keyword Tag, and that will automatically put it in the photography category. I'll type horizontal format and click OK. So, now we have three keyword tags. Let's start applying them to photos. To apply a keyword tag to one photo, I'll select the tag in the Tags panel. We'll start with the horizontal format tag, and I'll drag it onto the photo to which I want to apply it.

And now you can see that there is a little keyword tag icon under this photo. And if I hover over that, it tells me the name of the keyword with which this photo is tagged. If you don't see that keyword tag icon, then go up to the View menu, and make sure that the Details is checked. If you still don't see the tag, try making your photo thumbnails larger, by dragging the zoom slider at the bottom of the screen toward the right. Then you can apply a keyword tag to more than one photo at a time, and this is the way I usually do it when I am working with all the photos in this suite.

So I have three photos in the square format. I'll click on one to select it, and then I'll hold the Ctrl key on the PC or the Cmd key on the Mac, and click on these two other square photos. And then I'll take that square format tag and drag it onto anyone of the three selected photos. And that will apply the square format tag to all three of the photos I just selected. And then I'll click off of those photos to deselect them. Now, the real beauty of keyword tagging is that you can have more than one keyword tag on the same photo. And that makes it easier to find that particular photo later, because you could search by one of those keyword tags, or by a combination of keyword tags as I'll show you in a moment.

So, for example, I'm going to select three of these photos. I'll click on this one, and I'll hold the Shift key and click on this one, and that selects all in between. And I'm going to apply the keyword tag food to go to those three photos. Now by the way, so far, I've been dragging keyword tags onto photos. If you prefer, you can just drag photos onto keyword tags, and that will also apply the keyword tags. So let's try to do it that way. I'll click on any one of the three selected photos and I'll drag on top of the food keyword tag. And then I will click off to deselect those photos.

Now when I hoover over any one of these photos, I can see that there are two keyword tag icons representing the two categories of the tags that I've applied to each of these three photos. I am going to make one more keyword tag to show you yet another way that you can create and apply keyword tags. I am going to select all four of these photos by pressing Ctrl+A on my keyboard, that's Cmd+A on a Mac. And then I'm going to go down to the image Tags panel at the bottom of the column on the right. And here where it says Add custom keywords, I'm going to type a new keyword.

I'll make the tag markets, because all these photos were taken at a market in France. And then I'll click the Add button. And that automatically both creates a keyword tag, and by default, it puts it in the other category. And applies that keyword tag to the selected photos. I will deselect those photos, and now if I move over anyone of them, you can see that is has that keyword tag markets. By the way, another way that you can see all the keyword tags that you've applied to a particular photo, is to select the photo, and then take a look at the image Tags panel.

And there you'll see a list of all the tags that have been applied to that photo. Now the whole point of creating and applying keyword tags is to help you to find photos later. So let's see how we can use keyword tags to find particular photos. And to show you how powerful that can be, I'm going to go up to the top of the organizer and return to see all the media in this catalog. Now let's say that I'm looking for my photos of food. To quickly pull out of this entire catalog just those photos with the food tag, I'll go over to the Tags panel, I'll hover over the keyword tag food.

And notice that this little arrow comes up to the right of the key word tag food, I'll click that arrow. And right away, element shows me just the photos with the keyword tag food, and it also opens this panel up here at the top the organizer. If your panel isn't open, then click the arrow over here to the top of the organizer. When I click that arrow, that closes that panel and reopens it. Now in this panel, notice in the keyword's column, in the other category, food is checked. That's because right now we're just looking at photos wth food as a keyword.

And if you don't see the food keyword, then click the arrow to the left of the other category to expand it. Now, I want to see just photos of food that are square in format. So I'm going to scroll up in the keywords column here, and I'm also going to check the square format tag in the photography category of keywords. And if you don't see the square format, then expand the photography category here. And now that limits the results to those with just the keyword tags, food and square format as you can see.

If I want to see my food photos in the horizontal format, I'll uncheck square format, and I'll check horizontal format and I get a different result. Now that I've found just the photo I was looking for, I could select it and work on it in any of the editor work spaces included in a project, or share it with friends and family. When I'm done with my keyword search, I'll click the Back button at the top of the organizer. And that takes me back to see all of the photos in this catalog. And if I want to get back to that particular folder in which I was working, I'll click that folder in the Folders panel on the left.

By the way, you can edit a keyword tag, you can delete a keyword tag, and that can all be done in the Tags panel. I'll bring the Tags panel back by clicking Tags Info in the Task pane at the bottom of the screen. And let's say I want to change the keyword tag Markets. I'll right-click that keyword tag in the Tags panel. I'll choose Edit, and maybe I want to call this farmers' markets instead. And click OK. And that will not only change the content of that keyword tag in the Tags panel, but it will change the keyword tag on every photo to which I've already applied it.

And if I want to delete a keyword tag all together, I'll right-click and I'll choose Delete. I'll click OK. And that will not only delete the keyword tag from the Tags panel, it will also delete it from every photo to which I had applied it. You can see, we no longer have the keyword tag markets or farmer's markets on any of these photos. Now, keyword tagging does take time and effort, but I promise you that if you do take the time to tag your images, that will pay off in the end by giving you the most powerful way to find particular photos in your catalog.

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