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Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 10

The Full Photo Edit interface


From:

Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 10

with Jan Kabili

Video: The Full Photo Edit interface

When you have got photos that you're serious about editing, bringing them into the Full Photo Edit workspace is the way to go. The Full Photo Edit workspace offers the widest range of editing features, and the most control over the results. In this chapter, I'll cover the basics of the Full Photo Edit workspace, starting with an overview of its interface here. I'll open two photos into Full Photo Edit mode by selecting them here in the Organizer, and then going to the arrow to the right of the Fix tab and choosing Full Photo Edit. The Editor launches, and the photos open into the Edit tab in the Full subtab.

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Up and Running with Photoshop Elements 10
2h 5m Beginner Sep 20, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course introduces the photo organizing, editing, and sharing features of Photoshop Elements. Author Jan Kabili begins with a look at the Organizer, whose features make it easier to manage and find photos. She describes how to work with keywords and albums and how to use Elements 10's visual search features to find visually similar photos and duplicate images.

Next, Jan addresses Elements’ Quick Photo Edit and Guided Photo Edit workspaces, which streamline and simplify many common photo-editing tasks. She then introduces the basics of editing in the Full Photo Edit workspace, which provides tools for selecting portions of images, retouching, compositing images, adding text, and more.

The course wraps up with an overview of Elements 10's sharing features, including creating greeting cards, printing and emailing photos, and sharing photos on Facebook.

Topics include:
  • Importing photos
  • Keyword tagging
  • Arranging photos in albums
  • Finding similar photos
  • Processing photos in Quick Edit
  • Simulating depth of field with Guided Edit
  • Retouching blemishes
  • Adding text to a selection
  • Correcting lighting and color
  • Making photo creations
  • Sharing photos via email
  • Printing photos
Subject:
Photography
Software:
Photoshop Elements Elements
Author:
Jan Kabili

The Full Photo Edit interface

When you have got photos that you're serious about editing, bringing them into the Full Photo Edit workspace is the way to go. The Full Photo Edit workspace offers the widest range of editing features, and the most control over the results. In this chapter, I'll cover the basics of the Full Photo Edit workspace, starting with an overview of its interface here. I'll open two photos into Full Photo Edit mode by selecting them here in the Organizer, and then going to the arrow to the right of the Fix tab and choosing Full Photo Edit. The Editor launches, and the photos open into the Edit tab in the Full subtab.

Here in the Document window there's a tab for each of the open photos. I can move between the photos by clicking these tabs, or by going down to the Project Bin and double- clicking any of the thumbnails there. At the top of the screen is the menu bar, just like in any program. This is where to look for commands related to whatever it is you're working on. So if I'm working with layers, I'll look at the Layer menu, if I'm working with selections, I'll check the Select menu, filters are in the Filter menu, and so on. The File menu has an Open command that I can use to open photos directly into Full Photo Edit, even if I'm not using the Organizer to manage my photos.

I'll click in a blank area to close the menus, and then I'll come down to the toolbar. The toolbar contains the tools you use as you edit a photo. If you see a triangle on the bottom right of a tool, that means there are related tools behind it, and you can get to those by clicking and holding on a tool to bring up a flyout menu of related tools, and then you can select a tool from there. When you do select a tool, up here in the Options Bar you will see options related to just that tool. So if I click on a different tool, you will see those options change. At the top of the screen is the Application Bar. That contains icons for frequently used commands like Undo, and Redo, and a shortcut to the Organizer. And over here are the important panels where you will do a lot of work here in the Full Photo Edit mode.

Some of the panels are grouped together. To see a panel that's grouped with another one, I'll just click on its tab here. If I'm not using a panel or a panel group, I can close them by going to the menu icon that's on the right side of each panel group, and from there choosing Close to close the active panel, or Close Tab Group to close the entire panel group, like that. And now there's more room to open other panels. To open a panel, I'll go over to the Window menu, I'll find the panels listed here alphabetically, and let's say I want to open the histogram so that I have a bar chart of the tones in this image as I'm adjusting it.

I'll click Histogram, and the Histogram panel appears docked in the column on the right. If I want to get the panels back to their original configuration, I'll go up to the Application Bar, and I'll click Reset panels. I am going to make a change to the photo in the Document window. Any change will do for this example. I'll just go into the Effects panel, and I'll click the second icon there, and then click Apply to give my photo this graphic look. What I want to show you is that when I make changes to a photo, and I haven't saved the photo yet with those changes, in the Document tab I'll see a little asterisk, like this. So that means that I need to save, and to save I'll go to the File menu. I'll choose File>Save As, rather than Save, because I'm careful not to save over to the original, and here I can choose a destination for the file.

I'll come down here and give the file a name. I like to click just before the dot in the suffix, and type _edited on files that I've edited, and then I'll choose a Format. When I am editing a file in the Full Photo Edit workspace, I like to keep a master version with my layers and all the other proprietary features that Elements adds by choosing the Photoshop format, which respects all of those features. Later, if I'm making another copy for a purpose like attaching to e-mail, or putting online, then I might choose a different format for the copy, like JPEG, which does a good job of saving a photo and making it smaller. But at the same time, it flattens the file, so I can't access the layers in a JPEG for future editing.

So I'll choose Photoshop for my master copy here. I do want to include this edited copy in the Elements Organizer, along with the original, so I will check that. I don't really care about Saving in Version Sets, and I'll leave the other options at their defaults, and click Save. Now the asterisk is gone from the tab, so I can click the X to close this file. I'll go back to the Organizer so that you can see that the other file, which is still open in Full Photo Edit, indicates that an Edit is in Progress, and so I can't really work with it here in the Organizer.

To remove that red belt, I would have to go back into the Full Photo Edit workspace and close this file too. You will get more familiar with the Full Photo Edit interface as you work in it through the rest of this chapter. In this chapter, I'll begin each movie with the file already open, and you can use the techniques that I showed you here to open your own files. Also, don't forget to save and close your files when you're done editing in the Full Photo Edit Workspace.

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