New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Working with starter pages

From: Dreamweaver CS6 Essential Training

Video: Working with starter pages

There are going to be times when creating a new page from scratch is not your best option. If you're new to using CSS for layout or if you're simply looking for a head start for the structure and layout of your new files, Dreamweaver's starter pages offer over a dozen standards- compliant, cross-browser compatible layouts to choose from. These layouts render consistently in almost all versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, Safari, and Chrome and they're often a good choice for starting out. So to access those, you simply go to File and choose New.

Working with starter pages

There are going to be times when creating a new page from scratch is not your best option. If you're new to using CSS for layout or if you're simply looking for a head start for the structure and layout of your new files, Dreamweaver's starter pages offer over a dozen standards- compliant, cross-browser compatible layouts to choose from. These layouts render consistently in almost all versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, Safari, and Chrome and they're often a good choice for starting out. So to access those, you simply go to File and choose New.

Once again, I'm going to do Blank Page>HTML and then from Layout, I can choose from any of these options. So taking a closer look at these, we have options between one-, two-, and three-column layouts. We also have what's known as a fixed layout or a liquid layout. The fixed layout is going to be a specific fixed size whereas a Liquid layout is going to be based on percentages and will resize and reflow based upon the available space within the viewport, the browser window, or the screen at hand. What I want to do is I'm going to choose 2-column, fixed, right sidebar, header and footer.

Notice that when you select one of these, you'll see a little preview of what the starter page is going to look like, the little padlock icon there means that this is a fixed layout. Now in addition to being able to choose which layout you want to use, you can also still choose the document type and you can also choose where you want the Layout CSS to be added. So the simple creation of this page is going to generate not only HTML structure, but also CSS code as well. Now I'm going to choose HTML5 DocType and then for Layout CSS, I'm going to make sure for this particular example, it's added to the head. That's just going to make it a little bit easier for us to see.

You're also given the option of creating a brand-new CSS file, you also have the option of linking out to an existing file if you have one already out there, for example, handling typography because these styles are going to handle page layout. So I'm just going to choose Add to Head and then I'm going to create this page. So you'll notice what this creates, it's not really a template. It's what it says it is, it's a starter page. As you can see placeholder information and neutral background colors clearly marked content areas. So it's very easy to tell where the header is, where the sidebar is, where the main content is.

You have some written instructions on how the page is structured, how the styles are structured. So again, if you're brand-new to CSS, not only this just give you sort of a leg up on getting started and up and running with your pages but it's also very instructive, it's a great way to learn kind of how these files should be structured, how the code is written. I'm going to switch over to Code view really quickly here. You can see the code, you can see the structure but more importantly, in this case, because I embedded the styles in the head of the document, you can also see the styles. Now, one of the things that you're going to notice right off the bat and I'll just scroll up to the top of the styles, is that these styles are really heavily commented.

This gray text that you're seeing here those are comments, and essentially what you can do is you go through these styles, read through the comments, learn what these selectors are doing, what they're driving, why they're written the way they are. My good friend, Stephanie Sullivan, wrote these and she does a great job of explaining different browser imperfections and inconsistencies, why selectors need to be written in certain way. So this is as much instructive as it is anything else, and of course, if you're going to use this truly as a starter page, one of the things you'll probably want to do is come in here and sort of rip out some of these comments because they're quite verbose and very extensive.

They are that way for a reason but again, it's something that as you start replacing some of these styles with your own, you're going to want to go in there and sort of whittle some of those down. Now starter pages aren't for everyone. However, if you've never used CSS for layout before and you want to make sure you're using solid standards-compliant, cross-browser CSS, they are a fantastic place to start. If you already have a strategy for using CSS in place, and one of the starter pages sort of fits your layout requirements, it can save you a lot of time in the creation of your CSS as all you'll need to do really is simply tweak the existing CSS to be a little bit more inline with your specific needs.

Now keep in mind that the CSS and the page structure generated from starter pages is entirely customizable. You can go in here take away from the code, add to it, tweak it, really in whatever manner you want. Just make sure that you approach using starter pages with a very clear strategy, so that the overall implementation of them within your site is seamless. Towards that end, and in our next movie, we're going to discuss strategies for customizing starter pages and adopting them as part of your workflow.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Dreamweaver CS6 Essential Training
Dreamweaver CS6 Essential Training

90 video lessons · 52924 viewers

James Williamson
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 1m 4s
    1. What is Dreamweaver?
      1m 4s
  2. 5m 44s
    1. Welcome
      1m 4s
    2. Using the exercise files
      2m 17s
    3. Learning web design
      2m 23s
  3. 1h 0m
    1. Looking at the Welcome screen
      5m 9s
    2. Exploring Windows and Mac interface differences
      5m 6s
    3. Arranging panels
      8m 44s
    4. Managing workspaces
      10m 14s
    5. Exploring the Application toolbar
      6m 21s
    6. Exploring the Document toolbar
      8m 47s
    7. Working with the Property inspector
      9m 30s
    8. Using the Insert panel
      6m 30s
  4. 53m 3s
    1. Understanding basic site structure
      3m 46s
    2. Exploring file naming conventions
      2m 10s
    3. Defining a new site
      5m 23s
    4. Managing files and folders
      7m 57s
    5. Adding remote servers
      7m 4s
    6. Uploading files
      12m 46s
    7. Previewing in browsers
      9m 11s
    8. Managing multiple sites
      4m 46s
  5. 36m 41s
    1. Creating new documents
      6m 49s
    2. Setting up new document preferences
      5m 30s
    3. Setting accessibility preferences
      6m 49s
    4. Working with starter pages
      4m 32s
    5. Managing starter pages
      13m 1s
  6. 37m 23s
    1. Getting text into Dreamweaver
      8m 43s
    2. Importing Word documents
      4m 6s
    3. Adding structure to text
      7m 35s
    4. Creating lists
      4m 35s
    5. Creating definition lists
      4m 0s
    6. Using the Quick Tag Editor
      8m 24s
  7. 44m 41s
    1. Exploring the Code toolbar
      5m 41s
    2. Setting code preferences
      7m 19s
    3. Using code hints
      8m 8s
    4. Wrapping tags
      5m 7s
    5. Adding comments
      6m 29s
    6. Using snippets
      7m 32s
    7. Formatting source code
      4m 25s
  8. 1h 19m
    1. Setting CSS preferences
      9m 32s
    2. An overview of the CSS Styles panel
      9m 23s
    3. Creating a new CSS rule
      6m 42s
    4. Using the CSS Rule Definition dialog
      7m 25s
    5. Organizing styles
      7m 22s
    6. Modifying style properties
      6m 17s
    7. Controlling CSS through the Property inspector
      6m 37s
    8. Attaching external style sheets
      5m 54s
    9. Using CSS visual aids
      7m 3s
    10. Using CSS Inspect
      6m 48s
    11. Using the Code Navigator
      6m 39s
  9. 1h 11m
    1. Managing assets in Dreamweaver
      7m 30s
    2. Setting external image editing preferences
      4m 26s
    3. Placing images on the page
      10m 12s
    4. Exploring Photoshop integration
      7m 17s
    5. Modifying Smart Objects
      9m 42s
    6. Modifying image properties
      8m 4s
    7. Styling images with CSS
      6m 45s
    8. Using background graphics
      7m 28s
    9. Positioning background graphics
      10m 10s
  10. 36m 23s
    1. Link basics
      3m 17s
    2. Setting site linking preferences
      2m 19s
    3. Creating links in Dreamweaver
      9m 17s
    4. Using absolute links
      3m 43s
    5. Using named anchors
      6m 41s
    6. Creating an email link
      5m 25s
    7. Creating CSS-based rollovers
      5m 41s
  11. 44m 30s
    1. Reviewing table structure
      5m 20s
    2. Importing tabular data
      6m 46s
    3. Creating accessible tables
      6m 11s
    4. Exploring basic table styling
      9m 42s
    5. Styling alternate rows
      8m 57s
    6. Creating custom table borders
      7m 34s
  12. 59m 15s
    1. Understanding how forms work
      2m 45s
    2. Reviewing form design
      3m 44s
    3. Creating accessible forms
      5m 16s
    4. Setting form properties
      2m 39s
    5. Using the fieldset and legend tags
      2m 52s
    6. Inserting text fields
      6m 56s
    7. Inserting list menu items
      7m 54s
    8. Inserting checkboxes
      4m 14s
    9. Inserting radio button groups
      3m 52s
    10. Inserting submit buttons
      2m 25s
    11. Exploring basic form styling
      8m 2s
    12. Exploring form element styling
      8m 36s
  13. 33m 25s
    1. Adding CSS3 transitions
      8m 29s
    2. Spry overview
      2m 44s
    3. Using Spry widgets
      3m 57s
    4. Adding Spry effects
      8m 1s
    5. Using the Widget Browser
      7m 4s
    6. Extending Dreamweaver
      3m 10s
  14. 1m 2s
    1. Additional resources
      1m 2s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.