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Dynamic Dreamweaver Websites: Creating Login Areas
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Planning the login process


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Dynamic Dreamweaver Websites: Creating Login Areas

with Candyce Mairs

Video: Planning the login process

We are now ready to create our log in area for our website. Dreamweaver understands where our database is located, in order to work with the log in table. That log in table is where we store user information. We need a table and a database in order to authenticate against it. So, we can make sure users should actually be using the website. There are other ways you can authenticate for in log in area, but the database is a standard method, so that's what we're using here.
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  1. 1m 32s
    1. Welcome
      1m 32s
  2. 2m 57s
    1. Course overview
      1m 16s
    2. The course environment
      1m 41s
  3. 26m 58s
    1. Static vs. dynamic requests
      4m 8s
    2. Installing XAMPP on a Windows system
      8m 54s
    3. Installing MAMP on a Mac system
      4m 29s
    4. Using admin consoles
      3m 54s
    5. Installing the course files
      5m 33s
  4. 18m 36s
    1. Overview of the Dreamweaver interface
      6m 22s
    2. Setting up the course site
      6m 20s
    3. Previewing pages
      5m 54s
  5. 33m 38s
    1. Creating PHP pages
      5m 45s
    2. Adding PHP code
      5m 44s
    3. Displaying variables
      4m 45s
    4. Commenting your code
      5m 30s
    5. Working with includes
      5m 58s
    6. Building the course templates
      5m 56s
  6. 35m 13s
    1. What is a database?
      5m 2s
    2. Adding database tables
      7m 34s
    3. Connecting to the database
      8m 28s
    4. Getting data from a database: Part one
      8m 25s
    5. Getting data from a database: Part two
      5m 44s
  7. 1h 16m
    1. Planning the login process
      7m 25s
    2. Creating a login form
      7m 45s
    3. Adding form validation: Part one
      9m 22s
    4. Adding form validation: Part two
      1m 37s
    5. Exploring the registration page
      7m 17s
    6. Correcting table fields
      6m 1s
    7. Setting up the login landing page
      4m 1s
    8. Using server behaviors
      3m 36s
    9. Inserting new members
      8m 48s
    10. User authentication
      10m 3s
    11. Restricting access to pages
      5m 17s
    12. Testing the login
      4m 53s
  8. 1h 6m
    1. Admin area overview
      5m 9s
    2. Adding new users
      5m 19s
    3. Restricting access
      12m 25s
    4. Planning the admin update area
      5m 19s
    5. Building the members table listing
      6m 55s
    6. Building the querystring
      9m 14s
    7. Populating the update form
      6m 33s
    8. Updating the database data
      11m 28s
    9. Testing the admin update process
      3m 47s

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Dynamic Dreamweaver Websites: Creating Login Areas
4h 21m Intermediate Jun 06, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

An important but little-understood concept in dynamic web development is that of role-based logins, which allow different types of users to access different parts of the site. In this course Adobe Certified Expert Candyce Mairs shows how to use Dreamweaver's features to create role-based logins, restrict page access, build an administrator area, and test everything to make sure it works. Plus, see how to set up a development environment and work with a database from within Dreamweaver. Along the way, build your skills in areas like working with PHP, adding form validation, using server behaviors, and much more.

Topics include:
  • Installing XAMPP on a Windows system
  • Installing MAMP on a Mac system
  • Using admin consoles
  • Previewing pages
  • Working in PHP
  • Adding database tables
  • Getting data from a database
  • Building the login area
  • Planning the admin update area
  • Testing the admin update process
Subjects:
Developer Web Web Design Web Development video2brain
Software:
Dreamweaver
Author:
Candyce Mairs

Planning the login process

We are now ready to create our log in area for our website. Dreamweaver understands where our database is located, in order to work with the log in table. That log in table is where we store user information. We need a table and a database in order to authenticate against it. So, we can make sure users should actually be using the website. There are other ways you can authenticate for in log in area, but the database is a standard method, so that's what we're using here.

I want to discuss planning this log in area before we begin actually, doing it. I tend to find this is a tricky setup with regards to the clients I have worked with. So, I have an example of this within my resources area that I want to talk about first. So, within resources, the yellow bubbles here, on my website, in the design area, I'm going to go ahead to the flow chart example for planning a website.

And within this area I have an example flow chart that I have used for clients. I tend to have them asking me for a log in area. And they don't really understand the process of what is needed in order to do this, especially if it's a static website at the time. They don't have a database setup. So, we need to incorporate all of those pieces for them and I give them a price and they cannot understand why it's such a big deal. They figure, you just create a form, the user clicks the button, and they're logged in.

So, please make sure you plan your log in process. And that's what this flow chart assist me to be able to do. Walk through the different scripts with a client, so we could plan this all out. If I don't plan correctly, I can't give them the proper pricing, and we also, more importantly, can't decide on a proper deadline for the project. When can this go live on their website? So, if we start from the beginning within this flow chart. And I created this in VIZIO, it's a product I really like, but you can create this in any type of graphic editor.

What's nice about VIZIO is the arrows all stay connected, so when you move these boxes around, it just makes it a little bit easier. But users will start here at a log in page. So then, I ask the client, should there be a link to the log in form from every page on the website? Or what parts of the website should be able to access this? Also, what web pages lead to that particular process? Now, with regards to a log in, are we going to allow them to register on the website? In other words, anybody can come to their site.

Register to become a member. And once they're registered, they create a log in, user name and password, and we can use that. Or, are we within our company, Scuba2u, going to assign users to this log in area and we will handle it from our side. So, they won't be registering themselves through a form on the website. If they do a registration form, then we need a script once the user clicks that button to add them to the database.

What database are we going to use and what table are we going to populate with their information? Also, what information needs to go on that form? It's amazing to me. In order to create a form, we need to know what information the client wants to gather for the form. In other words, what data do they need from a user? And I generally have to ask that question of people. Because they don't necessarily think through all of those details. Once the user is registered, if we're allowing them to do that, the script will send them a link and an email to the log in page. This will authenticate that it's a correct email address and it assigns them a default user name and password.

In the email, they can click on that link, go out to the log-in page and change their password. Is that how we want to do it? Or do we want to let them choose their username and password when they register in the form? Now that we have gathered data from the user in some form or another. Either we added it to the database or they registered themselves through this process, they are going to log in. On the log in page, there will be a test script that runs to see if they can log in or not. So, this form will have a user name and password field on it. If they do not pass that script, in other words, if the log in fails, what do we want to do with them? Also, how are we going to handle forgotten passwords? Within our database, are we going to store those passwords as encrypted passwords? Which is what you should be doing for data.

If we do that, then we need to assign them a new temporary password, if they forgot theirs. Because once it's encrypted in the database, we cannot decrypt it. If the log in passes, they're taken to the log in homepage. Let's say this a member's area of the website, this would be the homepage for once you've logged in. From that page, you can access whatever information is needed once you log in. Change password link, once logged in. Is that something we're going to allow them to do, to change their password? And what are we going to do about logging out? Where are we going to send them once they log out? So, you can see, there's a lot of decisions to be made prior to actually creating any type of log in process. Now, I've made all those decisions for you for this course. But if you are going to create your own, these are things to think about. So, feel free to come out and use this as a base to modify. But at least it gives you an idea of some of the things you need to think about before you create a log in area for your website.

The plan for Scuba2u is users will be able to register from our website. They will register as a guest, if that's the case. For anybody being assigned an admin role within our website, they will be allowed to get into the admin area of the site to administer the database. But we will have to change them internally within our company. We will log into the admin area ourselves, as an admin, in order to add anybody else as an admin. So, that is the plan for the Scuba2u website and the log in area.

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