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Making CSS more flexible

From: Creating a First Web Site with Dreamweaver CS6

Video: Making CSS more flexible

Just like you want your web page to be flexible and fit different screens, different sizes, you also need your CSS, or your cascading style sheets, to be as flexible as possible. And luckily, CSS does just that because it enables the separation of the content from the design. And the CSS styles can be internal or external, so this is great. You can have that separation be, say, at the top of an HTML page--still internal to that HTML page--or it can actually be a separate page entirely and they're just linked together.

Making CSS more flexible

Just like you want your web page to be flexible and fit different screens, different sizes, you also need your CSS, or your cascading style sheets, to be as flexible as possible. And luckily, CSS does just that because it enables the separation of the content from the design. And the CSS styles can be internal or external, so this is great. You can have that separation be, say, at the top of an HTML page--still internal to that HTML page--or it can actually be a separate page entirely and they're just linked together.

So, this is obviously great because you can have multiple pages that use that one style sheet, and that CSS will affect all of those pages. Makes it easy to update, everything will be consistent, the file size will be smaller since you're just referring to that one file. So, let's take a look at how we do that, even moving some CSS from one web page out of it to a separate CSS file. Here I am in Dreamweaver, and I want my CSS and quite frankly all of my code to be as flexible as the layout.

And currently, if I take a look at my CSS, well, I'm wondering where does this CSS live? How is it set up? Well, if I right-click and go to code, I can see the CSS right in here. Well, where is it? It's actually inside of my HTML page. It's all embedded. So, if I happen to need to make multiple pages, they're all going to have those same CSS styles in each and every HTML page.

When really what I need to do is take all the CSS and put it in an external style sheet, and that happens to be what's going on here is there's an external style sheet from when I used a web font. So, that's what this is right here, that stylesheet.css is this style sheet. So what I can do is I can take all of these CSS styles just Shift-select them, do a right-click, and I can move the CSS Rules.

When I do that, note that it's automatically selected that CSS style sheet right here, and note if you didn't import any sort of web font, you can create a new style sheet from scratch. But in this case, since I already have one, I'll just point to it and select OK. Oh! What just happened? Oh! It indented everything. Says, hey! You know, I am part of this CSS now. So I can open that up. In fact, if I take a look at my code, I can see it's all moved. It's no longer in my HTML.

In fact, it's inside of this CSS. And check this out, it's linkable right here. So, I can click on stylesheet.css. This is nice! As I go into Code View, I can see all of my code nice and neat just like that. So, that looks pretty good. I'm going to save this document, and that's one thing you'll have to be aware of is you're going to want to start saving all your related files, because as you make changes in here, you want to make sure that it reflected in the source code.

But one thing I've noticed in here is, well, to be honest with you, I'm not crazy about where this stylesheet exists. It's within this Font folder. That's where the stylesheet.css is. And a good practice is to have it in a separate CSS folder. So, if I take a look at this specific folder, I can go ahead and move it, in fact, rename that folder. So, let me do that now. Here I am, here is my Font folder, and I'm going to just rename this to CSS just like that.

It doesn't bother me that there are some web fonts in here. It's perfectly fine. I just want to be really clear that these are my CSS files--will all exist right in the CSS folder. So I've changed it there. Well, what's going to happen if I go back into Dreamweaver and go to Design View? If I take a look at it, turn off this Live View, even turn it back on, you can see that I don't see it initially, and that's because I need to change this to CSS just like that. All right! There we have it.

I'm going to save all, or I can save all related files. But I'm saving everything. My style sheet is now in a CSS folder. If I go to Design View, everything looks good in Design View, and everything looks good in Live View. Another thing I want to point out as I take a peek at this CSS is that Dreamweaver was aware of the fact that there were images that were linked. So, when I moved all these styles into the style sheet, it knew to change the path to that JPEG.

So it actually has to go out a folder and then back into that Images folder. Let me show you what that looks like. It will go out a folder--so that's what those two dots are--go out a folder and then go into that Images folder to find that Background Home, okay? So that's how that works. I like how Dreamweaver is intelligent on knowing where items are, we can see that everything looks seamless and works seamless, and now what I can do is I can reuse this CSS across multiple pages.

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Creating a First Web Site with Dreamweaver CS6

30 video lessons · 39654 viewers

Paul Trani
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