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Creating a First Web Site with Dreamweaver CS6

Creating an HTML5 layout


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Creating a First Web Site with Dreamweaver CS6

with Paul Trani

Video: Creating an HTML5 layout

Before diving into all of the HTML code, quite frankly, Dreamweaver writes most of it for us. We need to understand what's being written sort of behind-the-scenes and enable us to write some of it if we want to as well. Well, it's all written with HTML, which happens to be a language for describing web pages, luckily, it's consists of really just plain text, and that text is surrounded by markup tags in angle brackets, as you can see here, the title of the page is called My web Page. Luckily, there are plenty of different HTML tags available, going beyond title we have section headings that we can implement one through six.

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Creating a First Web Site with Dreamweaver CS6
2h 48m Beginner Aug 30, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Join author Paul Trani as he shows how to create a web site step by step with Adobe Dreamweaver CS6, one of the industry's leading web authoring tools. But not just any web site. A responsive HTML5 web site that works across multiple browsers and devices, complete with rich imagery and text, a robust portfolio, video content, and even a contact form. This course covers how to use web standards such as HTML5 for structure and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control colors, fonts, navigation, and more. The course also demonstrates how to test across multiple browsers and devices and upload your new site to the web.

Topics include:
  • Understanding basic web principles
  • Adding content to a web page
  • Linking to web sites and email addresses
  • Styling content with CSS
  • Creating a layout that fits multiple browsers and devices
  • Building an HTML5 layout
  • Inserting images and video
  • Adding a menu bar
  • Creating a contact form
  • Integrating a Twitter feed
  • Uploading and testing a web site
Subjects:
Web Web Design
Software:
Dreamweaver
Author:
Paul Trani

Creating an HTML5 layout

Before diving into all of the HTML code, quite frankly, Dreamweaver writes most of it for us. We need to understand what's being written sort of behind-the-scenes and enable us to write some of it if we want to as well. Well, it's all written with HTML, which happens to be a language for describing web pages, luckily, it's consists of really just plain text, and that text is surrounded by markup tags in angle brackets, as you can see here, the title of the page is called My web Page. Luckily, there are plenty of different HTML tags available, going beyond title we have section headings that we can implement one through six.

We have paragraph text, so any time you've a lot of content, often times its paragraph text. Even within that paragraph text, you might have some text that has a link, and that's your h and a ref, which will link to something. You also have your image source in case you wanted to insert an image, so these are just common tags you may or may not be aware of. Going on from that we also have HTML5 tags. HTML5 tags are great, I love them because they're just a lot more descriptive.

And instead of having some generic divs with some IDs associated with them, you can actually just have some tags that say header, nav, section, footer, video, audio. Well, hey, I know what most that means and so do browsers. So it makes it really efficient, easy for me to develop HTML pages and the browsers can read them fine as well. All of those HTML tags are usually on an HTML document that's really just structured into three parts, you have up at the top the HTML version the document conforms to, so if it just says HTML, it means HTML5.

Then there is the head tag and between those two head tags exist all of the, mostly non-visual contents, you might have some JavaScript in there, some links to some CSS pages, which are cascading style sheet pages, things like that. But really most of the content you are going to be working with is going to be between the two body tags, the visual content, anything visual will be between those two tags. And all of those tags can be styled using cascading style sheets, which consist of selectors and declarations.

So here we have that paragraph tag, here's the CSS associated with that paragraph tag. Notice how it does contain a selector and declarations as well, so it might initially look something like this, but with the CSS applied, it will actually make the text red and the font Arial in this case. So that's the foundation for programming in HTML, as well as a little CSS. Now let's dive into Dreamweaver and start applying some of this knowledge.

Here I am in Dreamweaver, notice I've the index.html page open, and I have these various divs created, absolute positioned divs with certain IDs, okay. So you have this apDiv 4, okay, you have this you know Div2, and really they don't have a lot of meaning. What people would do is they start to define meaning to these various AP Divs or divs in general, they'd give them a specific ID name, like I can do here. And watch as I go into Split view I can just rename this to logo, for instance, hitting Enter, it changes it right here, div id.

The id = logo, and it changes that appropriately. Not only does it change that id to logo, it changes the selector. So let me go into CSS Styles, selecting All of the CSS Styles, you can see them all right here, and change that to logo, okay. But what people are actually doing is they are actually starting to name all of these divs with nav, with section, with header, pretty common stuff, so those have been standardized with HTML5.

So what we can do now is say for instance, for this one right here, this long bar right here, which is actually known as apDiv2, I can actually change that to an HTML5 tag known as nav, because that's what it is it's nav, okay. So let's make it even more descriptive. I can type that in here, but check this out, I can have that selected, going down here, right-clicking on this tag, I can use the Quick Tag Editor to edit that.

So right in here, deleting what I have there, type in--oh, look. I have code hinting for HTML5. Right there, I can select nav, do that less than sign and watch what happens. It's going to change the div id as well the closing tag right there, hitting Enter or Return, nav, nav, it's all good to go, but let's take a look. What happened in the styling? Well, the styling is in apDiv2, and that's not what this is referencing, this is referencing nav, so I just changed that name to nav just like that.

Much more meaning, really straightforward, and again, a standard works great! Coming down to this next one, as I select it, this is the apDiv3, again, changing it the same way by right-clicking, changing that div id and calling this header, why not, H-E-A-D-E--oh there it is header--selecting that, less than sign, hitting Enter, reapplying that style, changing this to header as well, that now has lot more meaning, it's just, much more helpful.

Lastly I can select this section of all this text, selecting that there, right-clicking, editing that, using the Quick Tag Editor. Again, I can just type it in there if I want to, but I like how this Quick Tag Editor edits not only the open tag, but also the closing tag like I did for header, header. So again, section--oh, look it highlights it--selecting that, less then sign, Enter or the Return key, and you can see right over here I need to change this to section as well.

That is much better, as I go back into Design view, everything looks just great, not only that, when I'm working with the code, the CSS, the tags, everything makes sense. And that's also going to make sense to the browsers. Okay, browser is going to be able to know how to render these different items, but here it's just going to make it much more easier for me to work in, now that I've added some HTML5 tags.

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