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Looking at how using a handwritten font affects the look and feel of a web page

From: Choosing and Using Web Fonts

Video: Looking at how using a handwritten font affects the look and feel of a web page

We didn't choose a Handwritten Font to work with because none of them are appropriate for our site. They are too casual, too personal or too old and traditional-looking. But I went ahead and made pages on my own using the three different handwritten fonts, so you can see how they affect the look and feel of our Web page. Let's start with Myndraine. It's the most systematic of the fonts; it's the least like handwriting even though there is a casual personal feeling to the text. To emphasize how casual Myndraine feels, let's compare it three other Humanist fonts we've used thus far in the course.

Looking at how using a handwritten font affects the look and feel of a web page

We didn't choose a Handwritten Font to work with because none of them are appropriate for our site. They are too casual, too personal or too old and traditional-looking. But I went ahead and made pages on my own using the three different handwritten fonts, so you can see how they affect the look and feel of our Web page. Let's start with Myndraine. It's the most systematic of the fonts; it's the least like handwriting even though there is a casual personal feeling to the text. To emphasize how casual Myndraine feels, let's compare it three other Humanist fonts we've used thus far in the course.

This is Merriweather which has a Humanist structure but the Slab Serifs keep it grounded and make it feel more systematic than Myndraine. This is Open Sans, which doesn't have the extreme shoulders that Myndraine does, so it feels more even on the page. And this is Crimson Text, it has the pen-formed terminals and Serifs so while it might feel handwritten, it's certainly doesn't feel casual. Myndraine looks like someone with really good handwriting could have printed it by hand.

Now it doesn't have a bold or italic so I want to show you how I managed to get around that. I haven't talked a lot about creating hierarchy in this course. I talk much more about it and go over it in detail in my other course, Typography for Web Designers. But here, without a bold or italic, I needed to figure out how to create hierarchy between the h2, h3, h4, the sentence about the Bay Road businesses, the quote and the text. So I used a couple of tricks I've been using all along. I primarily used size to create hierarchy in the headings, but size wasn't enough to make the article heading standout, especially for the Events, people tend to scan down the page looking for the next event.

So what I did is I set all the text and the h3s to a very dark gray. They are set at 333 instead of 000 and then the h4s are set to black. This helps them feel slightly stronger, slightly bolder than they are. I also took a tip from an earlier page, our Merriweather page, and I set the quote in that nice dark brown, so it pops out as a different voice but it does so in a light way, not a strong way and it doesn't compete with the headings. I also added a red to the Bay Road businesses.

I was more concerned about this sentence because it's important for the businesses that people know that they're still open. So I wanted to set this as a different color. I avoided blue because I didn't want it to look like a link, and I also avoided using really bright red. Instead what I did was I try to draw from a color already in our palette, that it feels like it still belongs with the page. The last place we had had some emphasis was in the word Union here, the name, it had been italicized. I decided to let that go, because, well it's not a book title or a movie title so it didn't have to be italicized.

And when I tried to set it a little differently, there were just so many things going on, on the page, it was just becoming a little bit busy. So looking at the overall texture of the page in the finished hierarchy, it's a casual personal feeling font that can do its job even without a bold or an italic. Again, I don't think it's appropriate for this site but I'd recommend it for the right content, a reminder that the tops of the letters do get cut off if you set Myndraine at 16 pixels or 11 pixels so you need to plan accordingly and avoid those sizes. I have provided the final files in the Exercise Files if you want to see how I set the text.

A warning though, Myndraine does use @font-face and the fonts were downloaded from Font Squirrel. So due to licensing issues, I haven't provided the fonts, you'd need to go get them from Font Squirrel yourself to make the page work on your system. So now let's take a look at the page set in Ruluko. We can see immediately that it's softer and it feels more handwritten. Again, Ruluko doesn't have an italic or a bold so I had to work a little bit harder to create the hierarchy. Ruluko is a lighter weight font, so even with the black article headings and the dark gray text, it wasn't enough to create the hierarchy that I wanted, and I really wanted people to be able to scan down and find an event.

So I ended up using all caps for the h4s. Now usually I add a pixel of space when I use all caps, because an all caps setting tends to feel a little squished, but I didn't have to do that here because Ruluko's letter spacing is very generous. And again, you can see I used similar approaches to creating hierarchy, we have that brick red Bay Road businesses sentence and the gray brown quote. I love this font and recommend it. I do have to point out one small problem which could be a make or break problem for other people but it's not for me, and that's the apostrophes.

They look like they're straight. Let me zoom in here using a Command++ on the Mac and you can see that they're not curly. I'm going to keep zooming in as far as I can because the apostrophe is very small and you can see that it's not a very curly apostrophe. And if I come back to Myndraine, again, I'm going to zoom in as far as I can. You can see that the apostrophe in Myndraine has a bit more curve to it. Ruluko's apostrophe looks more like what we would call a dumb quote, it's a prime symbol that's used to represent foot.

But, if you look very closely, you can see that it actually has been designed by the designer. It has a very slight curve to it and it relates to the comma in the text so it's just that this designer has chosen to create a straighter apostrophe. Let's go back out and so you can see, it's just sort of loses some of the curve that we maybe like to see with a font that has so many delicate curves in it. So again, some people might chose not to use this font because of the apostrophe but I would still use it. If I had a site where I had a lot of quotation marks then maybe I wouldn't but it's perfect for this site in terms of the number of apostrophes that are being used.

There's only a few of them so it would be okay. Now let's see, I also wanted to show you Sanvito. Sanvito looks like it would be appropriate if the town were a very old town somewhere near Venice. Sanvito has four weights; I used the Light, the Regular and the Semi-bold. I found the bold was way too heavy and dark for the article headings, it started to fill in. So that's the semi-bold we're looking at. And I usually use the light weight for both the h1 and h3 headings. But I found that the light didn't quite work for the h3 headings, it was starting to lose the sort of inky feeling of the font.

They were getting a little bit too thin. So instead, I kept them at the regular weight and I also made them dark gray similar to the text so they didn't become too overpowering. I feel a bit like a broken record but I want to be clear that I think that all three of these fonts are lovely and they hold up cross-browser and I would use them elsewhere. They're just aren't appropriate for an official government site, even one that seems to focus on community. In the next lesson, we're going to look at how to pair fonts. I can't promise but we might find a way to include one of these fonts if we can pair them with a font that is more appropriate for the content.

I'll keep an eye on that option as we move forward.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Choosing and Using Web Fonts
Choosing and Using Web Fonts

89 video lessons · 6942 viewers

Laura Franz
Author

 
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  1. 4m 41s
    1. Welcome
      1m 2s
    2. What you should know before watching this course
      1m 52s
    3. Using the exercise files
      1m 47s
  2. 14m 55s
    1. Recognizing the anatomy of letters
      4m 17s
    2. Understanding font classification
      4m 38s
    3. Finding and testing web fonts
      3m 41s
    4. Identifying common problems in fonts
      2m 19s
  3. 43m 43s
    1. Understanding Venetian fonts
      4m 0s
    2. Identifying a Venetian font
      4m 46s
    3. Understanding handwritten letters
      3m 22s
    4. Choosing a Venetian font
      3m 47s
    5. Creating a Typekit account and building a kit
      3m 43s
    6. Adding a Venetian font (Calluna) to your kit
      2m 51s
    7. Applying Calluna to your web site
      5m 54s
    8. Troubleshooting Typekit fonts that don't load
      2m 2s
    9. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      4m 25s
    10. Working with more than four styles in Typekit
      5m 22s
    11. Looking at how using a Venetian font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 31s
  4. 32m 53s
    1. Identifying an Old Style font
      6m 26s
    2. Choosing an Old Style font
      4m 30s
    3. Applying Crimson Text to a web site using Google web fonts
      3m 8s
    4. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      9m 20s
    5. Making various weights and styles work correctly across different browsers
      5m 16s
    6. Looking at how using an Old Style font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 13s
  5. 21m 12s
    1. Identifying a Transitional font
      5m 10s
    2. Choosing a Transitional font
      6m 36s
    3. Applying PT Sans to a site via Typekit
      2m 57s
    4. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      2m 59s
    5. Looking at how using a Transitional font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 30s
  6. 16m 58s
    1. Identifying a Modern font
      7m 50s
    2. Choosing a Modern font
      4m 0s
    3. Using Typekit to find and test web fonts
      5m 8s
  7. 26m 52s
    1. Identifying a Slab Serif font
      4m 30s
    2. Choosing a Slab Serif font
      3m 58s
    3. Deleting a font from your Typekit
      3m 1s
    4. Exploring a font with multiple weights and styles
      9m 41s
    5. Looking at how using a Slab Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      5m 42s
  8. 26m 52s
    1. Identifying "Other" Serif fonts
      5m 28s
    2. Choosing "Other" Serif fonts
      10m 12s
    3. Using a font without an italic
      7m 6s
    4. Looking at how using an "Other" Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 6s
  9. 20m 34s
    1. Identifying a Transitional Sans Serif font
      4m 29s
    2. Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font
      5m 14s
    3. Changing styling to improve the readability of text
      6m 31s
    4. Looking at how using a Transitional Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 20s
  10. 31m 23s
    1. Identifying a Geometric Sans Serif font
      2m 51s
    2. Choosing a Geometric Sans Serif font
      4m 33s
    3. Downloading a free font licensed for use on the web
      3m 53s
    4. Using Font Squirrel to create an @font-face kit
      5m 12s
    5. Adding the @font-face syntax to the CSS
      2m 57s
    6. Implementing the font family in the CSS
      5m 29s
    7. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      3m 56s
    8. Looking at how using a Geometric Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      2m 32s
  11. 21m 3s
    1. Identifying a Humanist Sans Serif font
      4m 18s
    2. Choosing a Humanist Sans Serif font
      7m 23s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      5m 32s
    4. Looking at how using a Humanist Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 50s
  12. 18m 28s
    1. Understanding handwritten fonts
      3m 4s
    2. Choosing a handwritten font
      8m 17s
    3. Looking at how using a handwritten font affects the look and feel of a web page
      7m 7s
  13. 33m 2s
    1. Understanding what to look for when pairing fonts
      6m 58s
    2. Using one font for headings and another for text
      6m 6s
    3. Using different fonts for different kinds of information on the page
      8m 38s
    4. Mixing and matching fonts within text
      3m 48s
    5. Looking at how using two fonts affects the look and feel of a web page
      7m 32s
  14. 23m 34s
    1. Understanding Script fonts
      2m 19s
    2. Choosing a Script font for display use
      8m 12s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      3m 33s
    4. Choosing a second font to pair with the Script Display font
      3m 42s
    5. Incorporating a second font with the Script Display font
      2m 53s
    6. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 55s
  15. 26m 38s
    1. Understanding Wood Type fonts
      3m 25s
    2. Choosing a Wood Type font for display use
      8m 35s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      4m 57s
    4. Choosing a second font to pair with the Wood Type font
      2m 28s
    5. Incorporating a second font with the Wood Type display font
      4m 42s
    6. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 31s
  16. 14m 58s
    1. Choosing an Art Deco font for display use
      2m 45s
    2. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      3m 51s
    3. Choosing a second font to pair with the Art Deco font
      2m 37s
    4. Incorporating a second font with the Art Deco display font
      2m 57s
    5. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 48s
  17. 27m 38s
    1. Choosing a Futuristic font for display use
      5m 33s
    2. Applying the Futuristic font and changing the styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      6m 40s
    3. Choosing a second font to pair with the Futuristic font
      2m 48s
    4. Incorporating a second font with the Futuristic display font
      4m 21s
    5. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 22s
    6. Looking at the set of four ads
      5m 54s
  18. 7m 29s
    1. Exploring resources and goodbye
      7m 29s

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