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Choosing and Using Web Fonts

Incorporating a second font with the Wood Type display font


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Choosing and Using Web Fonts

with Laura Franz

Video: Incorporating a second font with the Wood Type display font

We have our main heading set as Holtwood One Small Caps and we've picked Museo Slab as our text font. Right now, the text is still set in Georgia, so we need to fix that. Let's look at it in the text editor. I've already added the Typekit code for the Museo Slab from my Typekit. You need to add Museo Slab 500 and 700 to your kit, publish it, and add your embed code to this document so it will work on your system.
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  1. 4m 41s
    1. Welcome
      1m 2s
    2. What you should know before watching this course
      1m 52s
    3. Using the exercise files
      1m 47s
  2. 14m 55s
    1. Recognizing the anatomy of letters
      4m 17s
    2. Understanding font classification
      4m 38s
    3. Finding and testing web fonts
      3m 41s
    4. Identifying common problems in fonts
      2m 19s
  3. 43m 43s
    1. Understanding Venetian fonts
      4m 0s
    2. Identifying a Venetian font
      4m 46s
    3. Understanding handwritten letters
      3m 22s
    4. Choosing a Venetian font
      3m 47s
    5. Creating a Typekit account and building a kit
      3m 43s
    6. Adding a Venetian font (Calluna) to your kit
      2m 51s
    7. Applying Calluna to your web site
      5m 54s
    8. Troubleshooting Typekit fonts that don't load
      2m 2s
    9. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      4m 25s
    10. Working with more than four styles in Typekit
      5m 22s
    11. Looking at how using a Venetian font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 31s
  4. 32m 53s
    1. Identifying an Old Style font
      6m 26s
    2. Choosing an Old Style font
      4m 30s
    3. Applying Crimson Text to a web site using Google web fonts
      3m 8s
    4. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      9m 20s
    5. Making various weights and styles work correctly across different browsers
      5m 16s
    6. Looking at how using an Old Style font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 13s
  5. 21m 12s
    1. Identifying a Transitional font
      5m 10s
    2. Choosing a Transitional font
      6m 36s
    3. Applying PT Sans to a site via Typekit
      2m 57s
    4. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      2m 59s
    5. Looking at how using a Transitional font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 30s
  6. 16m 58s
    1. Identifying a Modern font
      7m 50s
    2. Choosing a Modern font
      4m 0s
    3. Using Typekit to find and test web fonts
      5m 8s
  7. 26m 52s
    1. Identifying a Slab Serif font
      4m 30s
    2. Choosing a Slab Serif font
      3m 58s
    3. Deleting a font from your Typekit
      3m 1s
    4. Exploring a font with multiple weights and styles
      9m 41s
    5. Looking at how using a Slab Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      5m 42s
  8. 26m 52s
    1. Identifying "Other" Serif fonts
      5m 28s
    2. Choosing "Other" Serif fonts
      10m 12s
    3. Using a font without an italic
      7m 6s
    4. Looking at how using an "Other" Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 6s
  9. 20m 34s
    1. Identifying a Transitional Sans Serif font
      4m 29s
    2. Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font
      5m 14s
    3. Changing styling to improve the readability of text
      6m 31s
    4. Looking at how using a Transitional Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      4m 20s
  10. 31m 23s
    1. Identifying a Geometric Sans Serif font
      2m 51s
    2. Choosing a Geometric Sans Serif font
      4m 33s
    3. Downloading a free font licensed for use on the web
      3m 53s
    4. Using Font Squirrel to create an @font-face kit
      5m 12s
    5. Adding the @font-face syntax to the CSS
      2m 57s
    6. Implementing the font family in the CSS
      5m 29s
    7. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      3m 56s
    8. Looking at how using a Geometric Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      2m 32s
  11. 21m 3s
    1. Identifying a Humanist Sans Serif font
      4m 18s
    2. Choosing a Humanist Sans Serif font
      7m 23s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the readability of the text
      5m 32s
    4. Looking at how using a Humanist Sans Serif font affects the look and feel of a web page
      3m 50s
  12. 18m 28s
    1. Understanding handwritten fonts
      3m 4s
    2. Choosing a handwritten font
      8m 17s
    3. Looking at how using a handwritten font affects the look and feel of a web page
      7m 7s
  13. 33m 2s
    1. Understanding what to look for when pairing fonts
      6m 58s
    2. Using one font for headings and another for text
      6m 6s
    3. Using different fonts for different kinds of information on the page
      8m 38s
    4. Mixing and matching fonts within text
      3m 48s
    5. Looking at how using two fonts affects the look and feel of a web page
      7m 32s
  14. 23m 34s
    1. Understanding Script fonts
      2m 19s
    2. Choosing a Script font for display use
      8m 12s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      3m 33s
    4. Choosing a second font to pair with the Script Display font
      3m 42s
    5. Incorporating a second font with the Script Display font
      2m 53s
    6. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 55s
  15. 26m 38s
    1. Understanding Wood Type fonts
      3m 25s
    2. Choosing a Wood Type font for display use
      8m 35s
    3. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      4m 57s
    4. Choosing a second font to pair with the Wood Type font
      2m 28s
    5. Incorporating a second font with the Wood Type display font
      4m 42s
    6. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 31s
  16. 14m 58s
    1. Choosing an Art Deco font for display use
      2m 45s
    2. Changing styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      3m 51s
    3. Choosing a second font to pair with the Art Deco font
      2m 37s
    4. Incorporating a second font with the Art Deco display font
      2m 57s
    5. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 48s
  17. 27m 38s
    1. Choosing a Futuristic font for display use
      5m 33s
    2. Applying the Futuristic font and changing the styling as necessary to improve the form and placement of letters on the page
      6m 40s
    3. Choosing a second font to pair with the Futuristic font
      2m 48s
    4. Incorporating a second font with the Futuristic display font
      4m 21s
    5. Setting fallback fonts
      2m 22s
    6. Looking at the set of four ads
      5m 54s
  18. 7m 29s
    1. Exploring resources and goodbye
      7m 29s

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Choosing and Using Web Fonts
6h 52m Appropriate for all Jun 27, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course focuses on the theories behind web fonts: what makes a good font, why different fonts look the way they do, and how fonts affect the look of a web page. Author Laura Franz covers common tasks, including downloading a font from an online source such as Typekit or Font Squirrel, implementing the font in HTML and CSS, and changing the size and line-height to improve the readability of text. The course also covers different periods of type design and explores the history behind handwritten fonts, text fonts (used for large amounts of text), and display fonts (used for headlines).

Topics include:
  • Explaining the history of text fonts, from Old Style, Transitional, and Modern to Slab Serif and Sans Serif
  • Understanding font classifications
  • Setting up a Typekit account
  • Choosing a quality font based on forms, spacing, and weights and styles
  • Accessing fonts from various sources
  • Implementing fonts with the @font-face syntax
  • Looking at how fonts affect the look and feel of a web page
  • Changing font styling to improve readability
  • Making various font weights and styles work correctly across multiple browsers
  • Pairing fonts (headline and text, two fonts in text, and so on)
  • Setting fallback fonts
Subjects:
Design Typography Web Web Design Web Fonts
Author:
Laura Franz

Incorporating a second font with the Wood Type display font

We have our main heading set as Holtwood One Small Caps and we've picked Museo Slab as our text font. Right now, the text is still set in Georgia, so we need to fix that. Let's look at it in the text editor. I've already added the Typekit code for the Museo Slab from my Typekit. You need to add Museo Slab 500 and 700 to your kit, publish it, and add your embed code to this document so it will work on your system.

I don't usually use fonts from both Google Web Fonts and Typekit, but when I do, I paste the Typekit code after the Google Web Font code. So now that your Typekit has been set up and the correct embed code is in the document, we need to apply the font family as usual. We need to add Museo Slab as our font family in our universal selector. Let's go ahead and do that now, museo-slab.

We also need to change the font-weight to 500; Museo Slab uses a 500 and 700 for regular and bold. And then down here in the h2, let's change our bold to 700. We can save that. Now in order for us to see this font in action, we need to upload it to our servers, so let's go ahead and do that. And then back in the browser, take a look at it from your server. Mine is at goodwebfonts.com/lynda and I can pick mine up here and that looks good.

It's now using the Museo Slab. Unfortunately, the Museo Slab is looking a little bit too big down here in the bottom line and I wish there was a little bit more contrast between the h2 and the text. So I think what I'm going to do is bring the text size down a little but keep the h2 as is. So back in the TextWrangler or whatever text editor you're using, I'll go ahead and change my font-size to 17 and 27, I'll save that, and I need to re-upload it, and then back to the browser, refresh it, I'm using Command+R on the Mac.

It's looking a little bit better, but I think that the text can get even a little bit smaller. So I'll go back and into the TextWrangler, change that to 16 and 26. Again, I'll keep the h2 as is, I like that little extra contrast. Upload, back to my browser and I will refresh again. And that looks pretty good. The Georgia font would have been fine, but I think the Museo Slab makes the ad feel more finished.

It was worth the extra effort to find and apply a second font. Now before we finish up this lesson, I wanted to show you one last thing. I've been thinking about the more complex headline fonts that I decided not to use for this project. I said they need to be set big in order to show off their detail, but we wouldn't have enough room to do them justice. Well, I decided to go ahead and try one of them. We didn't make this page in the course. I did it on my own, and I provide the file with the final files in the exercise folder, so you can take a look at it.

I set a page in Ewert which has a lot more detail than Holtwood One Small Caps. I set the font big like it deserves and it's quite beautiful. It works better centered at the size as you can see, and as I scroll down, you can see that Museo Slab still works well as a second font. Now the ad gets long, so my client might not like it. But when a font calls out to me, I'll often try a second version just to see if I can get it to work. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, and you never know, the client might love the unique experience created by such a long page.

It definitely draws out the quote and it creates suspense. Of course, when I do something like this, I need to be prepared for our client to try and merge the ideas. And I need to have the vocabulary and confidence to explain why Ewert can't be used smaller like we were able to do with the Holtwood One. I need to be able to explain to them and point out that Ewert was designed to be used big and that we'd lose all the detail we love if it's set small. I just wanted to show you that like most projects, there are multiple successful solutions to our Wood Type page and that changing a font can completely change the outcome of the project.

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