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Design Aesthetics for Web Design
Illustration by John Hersey

Using border styles to add rhythm and repetition


From:

Design Aesthetics for Web Design

with Sue Jenkins

Video: Using border styles to add rhythm and repetition

The next principle of design we will explore is rhythm and repetition, which has to do with how objects are placed within a web layout and the overall flow of your design. Rhythm and repetition occurs when one or more elements in a design are repeated often enough to create a visual rhythm. When considering this principle, it might be helpful to think of it in terms of music. For instance, you might have a base line and a melody, each having its own distinct beat and flow.
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  1. 2m 8s
    1. Welcome
      38s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 30s
  2. 9m 10s
    1. Understanding aesthetics
      4m 41s
    2. Examples from art and design
      4m 29s
  3. 35m 44s
    1. Understanding the elements of design
      1m 47s
    2. Using color to set the site's mood
      5m 50s
    3. Tweaking color values to add contrast
      3m 30s
    4. Using texture to add depth
      4m 53s
    5. Repeating shapes to unify your design
      2m 43s
    6. Structuring your layout with form
      3m 50s
    7. Using space to organize your design
      4m 38s
    8. Setting boundaries with line
      4m 36s
    9. Communicating with the right fonts
      3m 57s
  4. 38m 26s
    1. Understanding the principles of design
      1m 45s
    2. Using contrast to set areas of interest
      3m 8s
    3. Applying font styles to show emphasis
      5m 23s
    4. Aligning objects to achieve balance
      4m 40s
    5. Using hyperlink styles to create a sense of unity
      4m 10s
    6. Applying background patterns to create harmony
      3m 14s
    7. Adding movement with scrolling and animation
      3m 31s
    8. Using border styles to add rhythm and repetition
      2m 57s
    9. Achieving proportion by scaling objects and text
      2m 43s
    10. Simplifying by removing the unnecessary
      3m 21s
    11. Using gradation to create perspective
      3m 34s
  5. 37m 45s
    1. Responsive web: Creating CSS for different devices
      3m 2s
    2. Composition: Using the grid to organize space
      4m 45s
    3. Typography: Choosing and using web fonts
      5m 15s
    4. Color theory: Picking harmonious colors
      4m 16s
    5. Communication: Leading viewers through a design
      6m 30s
    6. Accessibility: Using size and color effectively
      6m 10s
    7. Originality: Stepping out of the box
      7m 47s
  6. 1m 57s
    1. Next steps
      1m 57s

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Design Aesthetics for Web Design
2h 5m Beginner Aug 29, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

A basic understanding of the principles of good design (such as contrast, unity, and balance) is the foundation for creating beautiful websites. In this course, Sue Jenkins explains design aesthetics in simple terms, and shows how to incorporate the principles of design in specific ways that improve your site. Learn how to adjust adjacent colors to add contrast, create depth with texture, incorporate movement, and use repeating shapes, patterns, and borders to unify your design. Then, in the final chapter, learn about special issues designers should address in their web layouts, such as responsive design for mobile devices, accessibility, and originality.

Topics include:
  • Understanding aesthetics
  • Picking harmonious colors
  • Structuring your layout
  • Using space to organize your design
  • Communicating with the right fonts
  • Aligning objects to achieve balance
  • Adding movement with scrolling and animation
  • Achieving proportion by scaling objects and text
  • Creating CSS for different devices
Subjects:
Design Web Design Techniques Web Design
Author:
Sue Jenkins

Using border styles to add rhythm and repetition

The next principle of design we will explore is rhythm and repetition, which has to do with how objects are placed within a web layout and the overall flow of your design. Rhythm and repetition occurs when one or more elements in a design are repeated often enough to create a visual rhythm. When considering this principle, it might be helpful to think of it in terms of music. For instance, you might have a base line and a melody, each having its own distinct beat and flow.

Similarly in design, there can be an underlying structure paired with free flowing design elements. At its core, rhythm and repetition helps to establish visual interest in a design. And it often happens naturally when you repeat similar elements, either regularly or irregularly within your layout. Rhythm can be regular with even intervals flowing like a series of geometric or organic shapes. Or it can be progressive, where the elements grow or shrink in some way, such as size, position, or color.

In fact, some degree of variation of repetition often works best as repetition without variety can become really monotonous. You can introduce variation to a design in several ways. For instance, think of navigation buttons on a menu bar. The button size might be the same even though the text on top of it is different, or the buttons might be different widths but the design of them is consistent. Similarly, you could make all of the thumbnails images in a gallery the same size and shape.

Or with CSS3, you could vary the shapes a little to add variety. Likewise, when working with your web layouts, you can build rhythm and repetition into the design by alternating the number of columns appearing in each row. Another simple way to add a sense of rhythm and repetition is by applying border styles in your design. Border styles can be any size and color and can be applied to any one, two, three, or four sides of an element with CSS. They can also be solid, double, dotted, dashed, groove, ridge, inset, or outset.

Border styles are great for helping to create structure and define areas, such as vertical dividers between sections in the footer, or even divisions between items in a navigation list. Border styles create a simple rhythm when applied to tables. You can also use border styles to anchor a heading or subsections within an article. In addition, you can use borders to anchor floating block quotes within a relatively blank space within a design, as shown here in this center region. Whether you add rhythm and repetition to your web layouts using a set of repeating elements or playing with border styles, remember to think of music when composing the flow of your visual designs.

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