New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Design Aesthetics for Web Design
Illustration by John Hersey

Color theory: Picking harmonious colors


From:

Design Aesthetics for Web Design

with Sue Jenkins

Video: Color theory: Picking harmonious colors

The fourth concept on foundational topics and web design is Color Theory and picking harmonious colors for the web. Color theory explores the nature, history, and role of color in art and design as well as color combinations and color mixings based on the color wheel. Using the color wheel you can easily choose harmonious colors to set the right mood or meaning for the content in your web design. You can create different kinds of harmonous color combinations depending on the number of colors you plan to use in your design.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 8s
    1. Welcome
      38s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 30s
  2. 9m 10s
    1. Understanding aesthetics
      4m 41s
    2. Examples from art and design
      4m 29s
  3. 35m 44s
    1. Understanding the elements of design
      1m 47s
    2. Using color to set the site's mood
      5m 50s
    3. Tweaking color values to add contrast
      3m 30s
    4. Using texture to add depth
      4m 53s
    5. Repeating shapes to unify your design
      2m 43s
    6. Structuring your layout with form
      3m 50s
    7. Using space to organize your design
      4m 38s
    8. Setting boundaries with line
      4m 36s
    9. Communicating with the right fonts
      3m 57s
  4. 38m 26s
    1. Understanding the principles of design
      1m 45s
    2. Using contrast to set areas of interest
      3m 8s
    3. Applying font styles to show emphasis
      5m 23s
    4. Aligning objects to achieve balance
      4m 40s
    5. Using hyperlink styles to create a sense of unity
      4m 10s
    6. Applying background patterns to create harmony
      3m 14s
    7. Adding movement with scrolling and animation
      3m 31s
    8. Using border styles to add rhythm and repetition
      2m 57s
    9. Achieving proportion by scaling objects and text
      2m 43s
    10. Simplifying by removing the unnecessary
      3m 21s
    11. Using gradation to create perspective
      3m 34s
  5. 37m 45s
    1. Responsive web: Creating CSS for different devices
      3m 2s
    2. Composition: Using the grid to organize space
      4m 45s
    3. Typography: Choosing and using web fonts
      5m 15s
    4. Color theory: Picking harmonious colors
      4m 16s
    5. Communication: Leading viewers through a design
      6m 30s
    6. Accessibility: Using size and color effectively
      6m 10s
    7. Originality: Stepping out of the box
      7m 47s
  6. 1m 57s
    1. Next steps
      1m 57s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Design Aesthetics for Web Design
2h 5m Beginner Aug 29, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

A basic understanding of the principles of good design (such as contrast, unity, and balance) is the foundation for creating beautiful websites. In this course, Sue Jenkins explains design aesthetics in simple terms, and shows how to incorporate the principles of design in specific ways that improve your site. Learn how to adjust adjacent colors to add contrast, create depth with texture, incorporate movement, and use repeating shapes, patterns, and borders to unify your design. Then, in the final chapter, learn about special issues designers should address in their web layouts, such as responsive design for mobile devices, accessibility, and originality.

Topics include:
  • Understanding aesthetics
  • Picking harmonious colors
  • Structuring your layout
  • Using space to organize your design
  • Communicating with the right fonts
  • Aligning objects to achieve balance
  • Adding movement with scrolling and animation
  • Achieving proportion by scaling objects and text
  • Creating CSS for different devices
Subjects:
Design Web Design Techniques Web Design
Author:
Sue Jenkins

Color theory: Picking harmonious colors

The fourth concept on foundational topics and web design is Color Theory and picking harmonious colors for the web. Color theory explores the nature, history, and role of color in art and design as well as color combinations and color mixings based on the color wheel. Using the color wheel you can easily choose harmonious colors to set the right mood or meaning for the content in your web design. You can create different kinds of harmonous color combinations depending on the number of colors you plan to use in your design.

The most popular color combinations are monochrome, or monochromatic, complementary, split complementary, analogous, and triad. When choosing colors for your own projects, consider both the business and the target audience so that you select colors that will be appealing and harmonious. You might also want to consider the medium, history, fads and competitors.

Let's talk more about these four factors. Medium first. On the web, colors are RGB, which tend to be more vibrant than color in print. This means you might not want to rely on a printed color book when choosing colors for a web layout. Instead, open up one of your graphics programs, and play around with squares in different colors there. Secondly, history. Every decade, or even every year or two, seems to have its own distinct color theme.

For instance, color blocking is currently on trend in web design. You'll also see a lot of monochrome, pastels, rainbow hues, and nature-inspired bright colors. Third is fads. Color harmonies will tend to shift with the seasons. In fact, professional color consultants select new colors several times each year. Web trends often follow fashion. So if you're seeking color inspiration look no further than the runway. You can also check out websites like Color Solutions International for their fashion color predictions. Last, let's talk about the competition.

As much as you admire what your competitors have done or your customers competitors have done It's probably a good idea to not use the same exact colors though it has been done. Instead, create your own palette to make your site distinctive. Color inspiration can come from just about anywhere if you keep your eyes open. You can scan anything including your own photos, magazine tear outs, paint swatches and fabrics and then digitally sample those colors. >> You can also comb through websites like Flickr, tumblr, and Pinterest to find new and interesting color combinations.

There are also some really wonderful color resources available online that I encourage you to explore. For instance, you can download a free standing color picker software or eye dropper software for your computer, or use an online version like the simple one at colorpicker.com In addition, you can install color browser extensions, plugins and color apps for your various devices. If you use Firefox, there's an extension called PixelZoomer that you might be interested in. Likewise, Chrome users can check out an extension called Eyedropper.

There's also a really nice list of color tools for designers at the HongKiat website. If you Google search for useful eyedroppers for designers, you'll find the article. And if you like to create your own palettes and share them with others, check out Adobe's Kuler Website at kuler.adobe.com. That's spelled Kuler and if you're using Adobe programs version CS5 and up, you can even integrate your saved color palettes with your designs through the kuler panel. Wherever you find your color inspiration, be sure to choose a palette that compliments your project.

Most design projects use two to four colors, with a main color, a secondary color, and one or two accents. If you choose a main color for your project that matches the mood of the product or service, you can then use the color wheel to help choose a harmonious secondary and accent colors.

There are currently no FAQs about Design Aesthetics for Web Design.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Design Aesthetics for Web Design.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.