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Color Correction in Final Cut Pro X
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Comparing color correction in Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X


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Color Correction in Final Cut Pro X

with Robbie Carman

Video: Comparing color correction in Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X

Chances are if you're watching this title on Color Correction of Final Cut Pro X, you've probably used Final Cut Pro 7 before and have probably used the color correction and gradient tools in that version of the app. In this movie, I want to quickly compare the color correction tools in Final Cut Pro 7 to those found in Final Cut Pro X so you can better understand how they compare. First, the video scopes in Final Cut Pro X are actually useful. Now don't get me wrong, the scopes in Final Cut Pro 7 were pretty good but lacked resolution and detail.

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Color Correction in Final Cut Pro X
2h 40m Beginner Dec 21, 2011

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In this course, author Robbie Carman details the principles of color grading in Final Cut Pro X, while explaining how to enhance and stylize footage. The course spells out the differences between primary and secondary corrections and demonstrates fixing problematic footage with contrast corrections and neutralizing color casts. The course also discusses secondary corrections with shape and color masks and explains how to make projects broadcast safe. Additional topics include evaluating clips using the video scopes, and how to create stylized looks.

Topics include:
  • Understanding the video scopes
  • Using Balance Color and Match Color
  • Fixing under- and overexposed clips
  • Expanding contrast
  • Controlling saturation
  • Using color and shape masks
  • Creating looks with primary and secondary corrections
Subjects:
Video Color Correction
Software:
Color Final Cut Pro
Author:
Robbie Carman

Comparing color correction in Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X

Chances are if you're watching this title on Color Correction of Final Cut Pro X, you've probably used Final Cut Pro 7 before and have probably used the color correction and gradient tools in that version of the app. In this movie, I want to quickly compare the color correction tools in Final Cut Pro 7 to those found in Final Cut Pro X so you can better understand how they compare. First, the video scopes in Final Cut Pro X are actually useful. Now don't get me wrong, the scopes in Final Cut Pro 7 were pretty good but lacked resolution and detail.

The scopes in Final Cut Pro X, on the other hand, are nice and sharp and provide a great amount of info to base your corrections on. The only downside? Well, currently you can't display more than one scope at a time. We will talk more about the scopes, of course, throughout this title as we make corrections. Next, the Color Correction effects bin that was a single category of effects in Final Cut Pro 7 is gone. While there are some filters or effects spread across the Basics, Light, and Stylize categories that pertain to color correction, a category that's pretty exciting is the Looks category.

This category has effects that create overall looks to your footage. Of course, these effects can be augmented by other effects, and depending on the look effect itself you can change different attributes of the look. We will talk about some of these effects that can color correct footage in a movie later in this title. The other thing about Effects in Color Corrections is that of course they need to be rendered. But now in Final Cut Pro X, that rendering can happen in the background, which can drastically speed up workflow if you've enabled it in your Final Cut Pro X Preferences.

So, I know what you're thinking--no Color Corrector, no Color Corrector 3-Way. Well that is the major paradigm shift between Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X. Instead of the three traditional color wheels in contrast sliders for the three parts of the tonal range--shadows, mid tones, and highlights--Final Cut Pro X introduces a new tool called the Color Board. We will go into depth about the Color Board later in this title, but put simply, in Final Cut Pro X you have no color wheels in Contrast sliders like you do with the Color Collector and Color Collector 3-Way effects in Final Cut Pro 7.

Instead, the Color Board takes the three major tasks of color correction-- adjusting color, saturation, and exposure--and puts them all into one place, but on three separate tabs or panes. Furthermore, the Color Board flattens out the color wheels, saturation controls, and contrast sliders in Final Cut Pro 7 into a board for each type of correction. Also, Final Cut Pro 7's Color Correction tools operate in what was called YCbCr, or generically, YUV color space, while Final Cut Pro X operates in RGB color space, which is really more how we see the world.

Here's another difference. In Final Cut Pro 7, you are always able to make secondary corrections, that is, corrections that affect only part of the picture. But in that version of the app, those corrections were mainly done with an HSL key or Hue Saturation and Lightness or Luma keys. This technique still exists in Final Cut Pro X and it is called Color Mask, but a new feature in Final Cut Pro X is called a Shape Mask. This feature lets you use a geometric shape often called a vignette or a window to isolate part of a clip for color correction.

We will talk about both Color masks and Shape masks later in this title. Final Cut Pro X also offers several Color Correction technologies to make your life easier, especially if you're an editor who doesn't have time for hours and hours of manual color correction. The first feature allows you to balance or to correct a shot automatically. This is generally a two-step process and we will explore in more detail in a later movie in this title. But it basically entails analyzing the clip for contrast and color and then having Final Cut Pro X use that data to make a correction for you automatically.

The other feature that I just love and that can make quick work out of the sometimes detailed and trying process of making shots in a scene or across a whole project flow together is a new feature called Match Color. If you like the look of one shot and want another shot in a scene or even in your project to have the same look and feel, you can use Match Color to match those shots. Is it perfect? Well no, but it can really help speed along matching shots and of course, you can manually refine a match after using the Match Color feature.

We will talk about Match Color in a later movie in this title. All in all, while different, I think that you will see over the course of this title that Color Correction between Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X is not all that different. What I mean is that the concepts of making a correction are the same. The capabilities are pretty much the same, if not better, and I think over the course of this title, you'll find Final Cut Pro X to have many of the tools you need to color correct your footage and projects.

There are currently no FAQs about Color Correction in Final Cut Pro X.

 
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