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Setting up a project file for the cameramatic

From: CINEMA 4D: Designing a Promo

Video: Setting up a project file for the cameramatic

Our goal is to create a scene that is the same length as our shot one from the animatic. It should use a correctly formatted camera and the dummy shark that we created in a previous chapter. We'll be creating about 10-15 copies of this shark and then moving them around in the scene, along with an animated camera. Now, this process is a little bit time consuming, so we're going to break this into some smaller movies here to make the process more manageable. The first step is going to be to import the camera file that we're going to be using for that movie. So, let's go to the File menu and do an Open and load in the 16x9 camera with 4x3 safe file.

Setting up a project file for the cameramatic

Our goal is to create a scene that is the same length as our shot one from the animatic. It should use a correctly formatted camera and the dummy shark that we created in a previous chapter. We'll be creating about 10-15 copies of this shark and then moving them around in the scene, along with an animated camera. Now, this process is a little bit time consuming, so we're going to break this into some smaller movies here to make the process more manageable. The first step is going to be to import the camera file that we're going to be using for that movie. So, let's go to the File menu and do an Open and load in the 16x9 camera with 4x3 safe file.

What this is, is a project file with a camera in it and that's the only thing in the file, and that camera has a set of splines on it and those splines represent the 4x3 title action and frame safe regions. Now, when you do HD, you normally have to take into account the fact that some people out there don't have HD televisions and you need to frame up your shots accordingly. When a person at home watches a movie that is on an HD television, if they have their HD set up correctly, then they'll see the entire frame. When a person watches that same movie on 4x3 television, an old television, that has a square picture area, then they'll see an image that's framed up with this white line.

Now, you have to keep in mind the bezel area on the TV, which is the little frame that's on the TV. Any title information that you put in the frame has to stay within this region. Any action that you have in the frame has to stay inside this region here and then this is the absolute edge of the frame. So anything outside this region will for sure get cut off and there's a good chance it'll get cut off in here. So you want to make sure that all of your actions, in this case all of our sharks, are going to be staying swimming inside of this center region. Now that we have our camera open, let's save this file as shot 1, so we go to File > Save As and let's call this one shot-001.c4d.

Now that we have our camera and we have this file saved, let's load in our shark that we created in a previous chapter. I'm going to just merge that shark with the previous scene. Let's go to the Object Manager File menu and do a Merge Objects, and then go to 04_01_start and load that in. What that is, is the shark spline and shark wrap and Spline Wrap that we created in the previous chapter. Right now we're looking through our camera file. Let's uncheck the Look through camera icon right here.

If I turn that off, I now can see my camera body and as I zoom out in the scene, I can orbit around and see my spline and my camera file. Now, when we create copies of the shark, I want to make sure that the shark spline and the shark Spline Wrap and all of the other pieces stay together with the copies. So I need to group this shark spline and the shark wrap objects together. I'm going to use a Null object to do that. So, in the modeling objects, I'll add a Null object to the scene and I'll call this one, shark 001, and then I'll take the shark spline and the shark wrap objects and then parent them to the shark 001 Null object.

Now when I grab the shark 001 Null object, everything moves together and that makes it really easy to reposition the shark in frame. Now, we have our scene file elements in position, but we don't know how long our shot is supposed to be. So let's go back to the animatic that we created in the previous chapter to check how long shot 1 is supposed to be. I'm going to move over to After Effects and under the File menu, do an Open Project and in the Chapter 4 folder, I'm going to select the 04_01_AEstart file and open that up and in here in the animatic composition, I can see my shot timecode for shot 1 is right here.

If I look at the shot 1 timecode, you can see it starts at time 0 and if I hit the letter O on the keyboard, the time marker will jump to the end of that layer and I can see that my shot ends at Frame 160. So from 0 to 160 equals 161 frames. So that's how long shot 1 needs to be. So let's move back to CINEMA 4D and here in CINEMA 4D, we need to change the render settings for our file. If I click on the Render Settings icon right here, that brings up the Render Settings options. Under the Output options, that's where I control what resolution my frame is going to be, what aspect ratio my frame is going to be, and also how many frames I'm going to be rendering.

So, let's start off with the frame resolution. Now our finished project is going to be 640x360 and I want to lock it to a 16x9 aspect ratio and right now I have a setting in here for 1920x1080 and I know that that's a 16x9 aspect ratio. So I'm going to lock down that ratio and change the Width to 640 and when I do that and I hit the Tab key, that's going to change that height automatically to 360. You can see the Film Aspect is 1.778, which is the mathematical way of expressing 16x9.

Now, the Frame Range needs to match our shot in the animatic, so we know that's going to be from 0 to Frame 160 and CINEMA 4D automatically calculates the number of frames for you as 161. The only other thing we need to change is the frame rate. Normally, when you're working in video, you use a 29.97 frame rate and CINEMA 4D can actually work at that frame rate, as long as you're working in version 11.5. If you have an earlier version, you're going to need to leave this frame rate at 30, but since I'm working in CINEMA 4D 11.5, I'm going to change that to 29.97 and hit the Tab key to get out of there.

Now, the last thing we need to do for our project file is set the preview range and the preview range needs to match our shot as well and if I change the start frame is going to 0, the end frame should be 160. Hit the Tab key. Now, this little slider bar here controls how many frames we see in the actual time slider. We want to see all our frames and now we're ready to go. So now that we have all of our elements in position, we've got our shark, we have our render settings done correctly, we're ready to start the animation process for shot 1.

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This video is part of

Image for CINEMA 4D: Designing a Promo
CINEMA 4D: Designing a Promo

70 video lessons · 13493 viewers

Rob Garrott
Author

 
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  1. 5m 8s
    1. Welcome
      1m 7s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 24s
    3. Overview of the project template
      2m 37s
  2. 11m 12s
    1. Creative brief
      1m 57s
    2. Sketches and script
      3m 8s
    3. Understanding the graphic animation process
      6m 7s
  3. 25m 5s
    1. Understanding the animatic process
      2m 15s
    2. Importing sketches into After Effects
      6m 20s
    3. Timing out the animation
      10m 4s
    4. Adding onscreen timecode for reference
      6m 26s
  4. 40m 2s
    1. Creating text and logo elements in Adobe Illustrator
      6m 44s
    2. Importing Illustrator elements into Cinema 4D
      8m 24s
    3. Creating guide planes for modeling a rough shark
      6m 13s
    4. Creating a rough shark model
      12m 14s
    5. Preparing a dummy rig using a Spline Wrap object
      6m 27s
  5. 53m 17s
    1. Setting up a project file for the cameramatic
      6m 15s
    2. Animating the rough shark using the Spline Wrap object
      5m 14s
    3. Animating the camera
      6m 8s
    4. Duplicating an animated rough model to create a school of sharks
      11m 4s
    5. Creating a preview movie and importing it into After Effects
      5m 45s
    6. Assembling the cameramatic
      8m 34s
    7. Fine-tuning the cameramatic timing
      10m 17s
  6. 1h 9m
    1. Preparing for the modeling process
      6m 7s
    2. Outlining the shapes using the Knife tool
      9m 50s
    3. Creating the mouth using the Extrude tool
      10m 40s
    4. Adding eyes using the Symmetry object
      9m 57s
    5. Creating fins using the Extrude tool
      7m 11s
    6. Creating the tail and dorsal fins using the Extrude tool
      10m 38s
    7. Creating gums using the Symmetry object
      6m 45s
    8. Creating teeth and finalizing the model
      8m 6s
  7. 15m 5s
    1. Understanding the rigging process
      2m 0s
    2. Opening the shark mouth using the Morph tag
      5m 9s
    3. Using XPresso to link the jaw to the Morph animation
      7m 56s
  8. 33m 25s
    1. Using BodyPaint to prepare the model for texturing
      8m 22s
    2. Applying color to the shark using BodyPaint
      6m 45s
    3. Giving the shark character by painting in the diffusion channel
      5m 29s
    4. Roughing the surface using the bump channel
      4m 34s
    5. Texturing the eyes
      3m 51s
    6. Texturing the teeth and gums
      4m 24s
  9. 21m 24s
    1. Replacing the rough shark model in the intro shot with the finished model
      6m 47s
    2. Replacing the rough shark model in the transition shot
      3m 43s
    3. Replacing the rough shark model in the hero shot
      4m 28s
    4. Replacing the rough shark model in the end page shot
      3m 42s
    5. Updating the cameramatic with the final animation
      2m 44s
  10. 50m 27s
    1. Creating an underwater look using Global Illumination and atmosphere
      9m 47s
    2. Lighting the objects and creating shadows
      6m 54s
    3. Shading the text using materials
      6m 28s
    4. Creating a reflective floor for the underwater scene
      3m 58s
    5. Lighting shot 1: Copying and pasting a lighting setup from another project
      5m 49s
    6. Lighting shot 2: Pasting a lighting setup and making adjustments
      3m 57s
    7. Lighting shot 4: Separate elements in a shot (the shark)
      3m 13s
    8. Lighting shot 4: Separate elements in a shot (the text)
      10m 21s
  11. 22m 7s
    1. Preparing shot 1 for rendering to After Effects
      6m 20s
    2. Preparing shot 2 for rendering by saving and using render presets
      4m 45s
    3. Preparing shot 3 for rendering
      2m 37s
    4. Setting up shot 4 to render in two passes
      4m 4s
    5. Performing a preflight check to ensure clips are ready to render
      2m 9s
    6. Batch-rendering
      2m 12s
  12. 1h 13m
    1. Importing assets and setting up the After Effects project for final compositing
      6m 5s
    2. The intro shot: Using Photoshop elements and noise effects to add atmosphere
      8m 38s
    3. The intro shot: Compositing in stock video footage to add character
      4m 51s
    4. The intro shot: Adding text elements to the composite
      8m 32s
    5. The hero shot: Controlling the look using precomps
      7m 59s
    6. The hero shot: Using stock video footage to add character
      7m 19s
    7. The end page shot: Combining multiple passes to form a final composite shot
      2m 41s
    8. The end page shot: Adding text elements to the composite
      7m 44s
    9. Compositing the transition shots
      3m 47s
    10. Assembling the final composition
      9m 2s
    11. Adding the final audio to the composition and rendering
      7m 10s
  13. 21s
    1. Goodbye
      21s

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