Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

CINEMA 4D Essentials 4: Materials, Texturing, and Lights
Illustration by Richard Downs

Painting on objects and textures with brushes


From:

CINEMA 4D Essentials 4: Materials, Texturing, and Lights

with Rob Garrott

Video: Painting on objects and textures with brushes

BodyPaint is a complete image painting program, and it's got a great set of brushes and controls for painting on the surface of your object, and that's just what we're going to do right now. I've got the Painting Start File open, and this is where we left off in the last movie. Let's take a look at the layers. If I go to Materials palette and select the material and go back to the layers, you can see that we've got several different layers here based on the elements that we're going to be painting in our scene. And right now these layers are all empty, but we're going to start filling them up with paint.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
CINEMA 4D Essentials 4: Materials, Texturing, and Lights
2h 24m Beginner Sep 20, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

CINEMA 4D Essentials with Rob Garrott is a graduated introduction to this complex 3D modeling, rendering, and animation program, which breaks down into installments that can be completed within 2 hours. This course shows how to lend 3D objects color, transparency, and life with materials, textures, and lights. Author Rob Garrott explains how to create a variety of surface textures, from smooth and reflective to bumpy and flat, and how to add dramatic depth and shadows to your scenes with the different light types in CINEMA 4D. The final chapter discusses texturing in 3D with the BodyPaint module, which can also help hide UV seams.

Topics include:
  • Understanding material channels
  • Applying materials via projection
  • Limiting materials with selection tags
  • Texturing type
  • Using Falloff to limit the effects of lights
  • Working with visible or volumetric light
  • Painting on objects and textures with brushes in BodyPaint
  • Hiding seams with projection painting
Subjects:
3D + Animation Rendering Textures Materials Visual Effects
Software:
CINEMA 4D
Author:
Rob Garrott

Painting on objects and textures with brushes

BodyPaint is a complete image painting program, and it's got a great set of brushes and controls for painting on the surface of your object, and that's just what we're going to do right now. I've got the Painting Start File open, and this is where we left off in the last movie. Let's take a look at the layers. If I go to Materials palette and select the material and go back to the layers, you can see that we've got several different layers here based on the elements that we're going to be painting in our scene. And right now these layers are all empty, but we're going to start filling them up with paint.

Let's go to the Accents layer. Make sure you highlight that right now. And there's a couple different ways to paint in BodyPaint. I'm going to select the brush. And then I'm going to choose a brush. Under the Brushes palette, there are a bunch of presets. If I twirl open the BodyPaint 3D folder, there's a BodyPaint Presets folder and a Brushes folder and then a whole bunch of subfolders underneath. All these brushes are there for you to use. The hardest part is choosing which one. Our hero is going to have flat blocks of color on his arms and torso and legs that blend into his base color with a little bit of a chalk-brush pattern.

So, to start off by painting, we're going to paint the accents in with a large block of color so, we just need a really basic brush. Underneath the standard tools, I can get just the regular Airbrush and I can go the Airbrush Properties and adjust them. Let's bring that window open here. I'm going to enlarge that up just a bit as well. I'm going to change the Hardness and bring that up, Intensity. I'm also going to adjust the Spacing. You may have noticed that these controls are very similar to what you'd see inside of Photoshop. I'm going to bring the Spacing down to 1 so that I have a nice smooth brush.

Now, I can go in and start painting. Now, I could paint right on the surface of my object. You can see that my brush is a little bit small. There's a great keyboard shortcut for adjusting the size of your brush, and that's the middle mouse button. If you click and hold the middle mouse button and drag to the left or right, you'll be adjusting the size. Up and down adjusts the pressure. But for now, I'm going to drag to the right and enlarge my brush quite a bit. Next, I want to choose a color to paint with, and the accents on our hero are going to be yellow, so let's go to the Colors palette and just raise that up a bit.

And let's choose a nice yellow that has a little bit of red in it. That's pretty good and a very fully saturated. Pull some of that red out there. There we go. And now I'm ready to start painting. If I paint on my object in this window, watch what happens. You notice that there's some lines happening, and it stopped right there in the thumb. You can see as I was painting across that I've got this hard edge right here. That hard edge is caused by the seams in the UV mesh. Let's click over to the Texture window and see what happened when we paint it. Now, you notice, even though I painted in one spot on my model, the paintbrush painted in three spots over here in the Texture window. That's because all of these polygons that I have represented here were in the view that I painted on, and so it re-created those brush strokes here.

That hard edge that I spoke about is actually right here on my model. There's that spot on his hand that created that hard edge. You notice there are no adjoining polygons out here, and so it didn't know what to do, how to display them, so it doesn't display anything. One of the problems with using the UV Paint Wizard is that it doesn't always give you a super-clean mesh to work with when you're done with the UV Layout. You can do a lot of great things with this UV Layout, but it does create some problems when you're painting directly on the model. Now, you can solve a lot of that with something called Projection Painting, and we'll talk about that later. We'll use that to clean up our seams.

But for now, instead of painting on the model, we're going to paint here inside the Texture window and then check our work on the model. So, I'm going to undo, Command+Z or Ctrl+Z to get rid of those brushstrokes. And then what I'm going to do is start to paint my blocks of color. I know that my hero is going to have some shorts on, so let's go in here and zoom in on the texture. I'm using the 1 and 2 keys to navigate in. And I'm going to paint something on his torso here. So, let's go ahead and paint right across here and then give him some shorts. Let's check our work in the texture view.

You can see that I've got a good start on his short right there. Rather than having to click back and forth between the texture view and the View panel, what I can do is undock the View panel and dock it next to the texture view. The way I'm going to do that is by right- clicking on this little gray grid and going Undock. That undocks my view panel. And now I can take it and park it next to this window. I'll take the same little grid of dots and drag to the right of the texture view. When I let go, I now have both of these views side by side.

Now, I can paint here and see the result here in the Editor window. So, now I can see that these polygons represent the side of my guy. And you notice that there's a series of lines here. Those lines correspond to the lines that wrap around my object, and I'm going to paint right about here. That's going to line up with that guy. And I'm not going to worry about that I've got an offset here. You notice if I zoom in, you'll see I've got that little offset right there. That's because there's a difference in the height between the polygons here and over here. And that's okay.

I'm going to go down and paint just a little bit on his leg too, and go down. That's pretty good. I'll do the same thing over here, and paint down about the same distance on this leg. And that's on the outside. Now, I can do the inside of the leg, which is this area here, and I'll paint down on the inside of his leg and paint there. Not bad! I'm not going to worry too much about whether or not to get the areas even or not. This is going to be a very organic sort of costume, and they don't have to be super precise. Then I'll paint on his leg this way.

Here's another one right there. Let's get that one right there. That's on the backside of one of his legs. Be careful that you don't accidentally paint into an area right there. I'm going to undo that, Command+Z or Ctrl+Z, and paint just in that area right there. Let's back out a little bit and see if there are any other parts of his leg that we missed. And I think that I've got them all here, but now you can see that if I orbit around, underneath, in his crotch area, that I don't have anything painted there. So, what I'm going to do is paint right in this area.

Let's zoom in and I'm going to use my middle mouse button to get a smaller brush. And now I can paint right here on his crotch. And let's go ahead and fill in all this detail. There we go. You can orbit around a bit. Yeah, that's pretty good right there. And we can paint these polygons here. I want to be careful about where I paint. Now when I paint something here, let's paint something right on his bottom, and see where it made that mark.

And so you can see, there are the polygons that are associated with both the crotch and the butt area, and so let's zoom in on that. And now I can paint this block of color as well, and I'll be filling that in nicely. There we go. Let's see where this area is. I'm going to put a dot right there. Boom! Let's back out and see where that dot is. There it is, over there. So, you can see that this area here goes right up from his bottom all the way up his back. I want to be careful about where I paint, so let's paint right across his back right here.

That's a little too high. Let's go down a level--there we go-- and then fill in all that color right there. Nice! And you can see I am missing some polygons right there, so let's go in and paint right on that. There we go, nice! Let's back out a bit and see what's next. Next up is the legs, and before we go any further, let's do a quick Save As. I'm going to do a File > Save As, and we're going to call this one painting-working.

Now, when we do this, it's going to overwrite the Spacedude_Color tiff file that's already in our folder. Don't forget that you can go back to the previous movie's exercise files to get the starting point for this file, in case you mess this up. So let's type in WORKING here. It's going to ask me, Do you want to save the changes to the textures? Yes, I do. Now, I can go in and start painting again. Let's figure out his legs next, and let's go in and grab the blocks of color on his leg.

And I'm going to paint a little bit low. Let's go right here and see where that showed up at. That's probably on the inside of that leg, and that's pretty good. I'm going to paint across his leg that way. That's probably on the backside of that same leg. And now I can fill in those blocks of color right there. Let's just go in and paint and then get that going. I want to be very careful about accidentally painting on other areas. And let's do the same thing right here. Let's go there. I could use the Selection tool and do a rectangular selection around that area too, but painting works just fine.

Now, I'm going to go on this leg and paint down up a little bit lower and fill in that block of color. Let's grab that. In fact, I think I will use my Selection tool. Let's go back to the Rectangular Selection tool and grab a rectangular selection there and then we'll do a fill layer. So, go to the Texture View Edit menu and do Fill Layer and that's going to fill it. And we will do the same thing over here. Let's draw a rectangular selection around that right there. And then let's move that down just a bit and over. There we go! And do Edit > Fill Layer again, and you can see that's working just fine.

Don't worry that they're offset a little bit. I'm going to do the same thing over here and grab those polygons right there and do an Edit > Fill Layer. Nice! Let's see what that did. That should have done on the front, and it did. And now I can go over and find those polygons on his leg. There they are, over there. I'll draw a rectangle on that one. And then I'll hold down the Shift key and draw another rectangle that right about there, on that one. Let's grab it a little bit more, holding down the Shift key to add to the selection.

Let's go to Edit > Fill Layer one more time. I got that going. Now, I need to figure out where these polygons are, so let's get the Brush tool again and put a dot right there. Now, when I painted, nothing happened, and that's because I still have my Selection going. I can't paint anyplace except inside the marching ants. Let's go to do the Select menu and Deselect All. And then let's paint a little dot there and see where that dot is, and you can see it showed up right there, so I can get my Selection tool again. And let's also paint a dot on this one right here, and then a dot right there, and then a dot right there.

Okay, we're good to go with those. So let's make a selection. We'll fill all of that with color. And then go to the Edit > Fill Layer. I think that's pretty good. Last up are the hands. The hands are going to be a little bit tricky, because they're much more broken up than the rest of the object. So, what we'll do is start off by grabbing blocks of color for these parts of the hands. We know these are the hands here.

So, let's grab those. Let's grab this one right here. And I'm going just with the second line, just about there. And let's do another one for that right there. Pretty good, and then let's do another one for that one right there. And notice as I make my selections here, I get selections on my object here in the Editor window as well. And I'm going to draw a selection around this part of his hand as well. That's going to be on his other hand, probably.

Oh no, it is on that hand. And I can draw a rectangle around that area right there. I know that's part of it. And I'll do the same thing right here. And every place I draw, I can see that it's filling those in with marching ants as well. Now, I'm not sure where these other polygons are. Now, I'm going to accidentally screw this up on purpose. You want to be really careful. If I try and draw a rectangular selection here inside the viewport, you'll notice it's going to completely screw up my marching ants.

And if I try and undo that selection, then it really doesn't redo the selection correctly, so be very careful. Now what I need to do is go back in and fill those marching ants in over here. And I know that these are all hands over here, so I can just hold down the Shift key and grab all those polygons. Let's undo that. Command+Z or Ctrl+Z. I want to grab just these guys. And so, I'm going to hold the Shift key down and grab those polygons right there. Very good! And then grab those polygons right there and then these polygons here.

Let's arrow over, grab those guys, since they're missing. And then I think we're good. I think also I need to have those polygons right there. And before I go on any further, I think that's good. Let's go ahead and fill this section. So, I'll go Edit menu, Fill Layer, and now I've got that color blocked in. Now, I can figure out where these polygons are on his hand. And actually, the easier thing to do is just to go zoom in on this area and then grab the Brush tool and just start painting.

Let's deselect, so go to the Select menu in the texture view and Deselect All and then just paint in that texture. There we go. Nice! That fills in nicely. You want to be very careful, when you're painting in a viewport like this. I don't want to accidentally paint on his head. So, I'll just go here and paint like that, and then let's orbit over to his other hand. Oh, it looks like I missed a spot right there.

I can see that, most likely, these polygons are with his hand, and you can see, as I hover my brush over, I can see that they are in fact part of his hands, so I'll just go ahead and paint those guys right there. And I think those are his hand as well. Yup, they are, so I can paint right in there as well. And let's get the last little bit. It's probably that area right there. I think that last little bit is some other place on his body. In fact, let's fill that with yellow and see where that shows up at.

You can see there, that's the tip of his shoulder right there, so let's Undo. Command+Z or Ctrl+Z on that one. Looks like also I accidentally bled over on his shoulder a little bit. Oh, no I didn't. I'm good to go. There we go! As you can see, this process is a lot like working in Photoshop, with the added benefit of being able to see a real-time representation of what's happening on your model. Now that we've got our blocks of color in place, we can go back and fine-tune with Projection Painting.

There are currently no FAQs about CINEMA 4D Essentials 4: Materials, Texturing, and Lights.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed CINEMA 4D Essentials 4: Materials, Texturing, and Lights.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked