Start your free trial now, and begin learning software, business and creative skills—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

Start Your Free Trial Now

Understanding body movement and prop handling


From:

On Camera: Develop Your Video Presence

with Rick Allen Lippert

Video: Understanding body movement and prop handling

Quite often, on-camera presenters have to walk and handle props. By props, I mean anything that you hold in your hands. Or you may be interviewed on-camera where you have to demonstrate something that involves walking and handling objects. As I mentioned earlier in the movie about posture and stance, you want to avoid rapid body movements. So what should you do, and how do you handle those props or objects like a pro? When it comes to movement, one thing to always try to do is to walk with a purpose from one place to another.
please wait ...
Watch the Online Video Course On Camera: Develop Your Video Presence
41m 58s Appropriate for all Dec 04, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Join Rick Allen Lippert as he shows you how to conduct yourself on camera and make a positive impression in front of the lens. This course covers basic issues like posture, eye contact, vocal tone, and choosing the right clothing and makeup. Rick also explains how to move across the stage fluidly and handle props, as well as what to do when you make the inevitable mistake.

Subjects:
Business Video Education + Elearning
Author:
Rick Allen Lippert

Understanding body movement and prop handling

Quite often, on-camera presenters have to walk and handle props. By props, I mean anything that you hold in your hands. Or you may be interviewed on-camera where you have to demonstrate something that involves walking and handling objects. As I mentioned earlier in the movie about posture and stance, you want to avoid rapid body movements. So what should you do, and how do you handle those props or objects like a pro? When it comes to movement, one thing to always try to do is to walk with a purpose from one place to another.

This looks better than the walk to nowhere, just to be moving. Any movement should be motivated. You also want to always rehearse with the camera crew any blocking. That's movie speak for movement. This way they know in advance where you will go and what you will do. They will also tell you where you may need to turn, stop or do something. They may also put down pieces of tape on the floor called marks to indicate to you where you should be at any given point.

Your starting mark is always called one. Subsequent marks will be numbered mark two, mark three, and so on, so that everyone knows the plan. Video crews generally don't like surprises when it comes to the talent doing something unplanned. But whether the talent blew a take or the camera operator shook the camera, or the sound person detected a noise, the phrase you'll hear that tells everyone to get ready for another take is 'back to one.' When it comes to what to do with your hands, again, remember the audience.

If the topic is fun, you can use your hands and gesture more than if the topic is somber. How much hand gesturing should you do? Again, any hand movement should be motivated. You want it to be natural to you. Don't feel as if you have to gesture. Some folks just don't talk with their hands. Others can't say three words without having to draw their emotions in the air. Here's a great tip for making sure your gestures don't get too wild. Keep your elbows tucked in and your upper arms touching your body.

That way your hands and arms won't flail all over the place like some kind of cartoon character. Sometimes we have to work with props, or you may be interviewed about your job or hobby that involves doing something with objects. The first thing you always want to do is make friends with your props. Pick them up, handle them, get familiar with them. What you don't want to happen is to pick up a prop for the first time while you're on camera and have it come apart because you weren't holding it correctly.

It's generally okay to look or glance at a prop that's on the table, especially if the audience can see it. This is where having a camera rehearsal comes in handy. You should pick it up only if that's the plan. And when you do pick up a prop or an object, keep in mind that the camera needs to see it. Keep the prop close to your body or up by your face, this is especially helpful if you're promoting something. The camera can get a tighter shot of your face and this fabulous thing that the viewer is definitely going to want after seeing you smiling while you talk about it and admire it.

Walking and talking and handling props is not as easy as it looks. In fact, it's rather difficult. But here are a couple of tips to make the job easier. You maybe able to set the props face down, so you can just pick them straight up without having to turn them over or around. Then while you're walking and picking up the props, bring each one up close to your body and hold it still, long enough for the audience to see it before setting it back down. I call this letting the prop land with a definite stop. Don't just pick it up and wave it around.

If the audience can't see it, they won't want it, or they won't know what it is. So hold it still, even for just a moment. Have you ever watched a television game show that had a gorgeous model in a sparkling gown wave her hands over an object of desire? Anyway, if you look closely, you will notice that the model rarely touches the object, she merely waves her hand over it. And if she does touch it, it's a very light touch. This is called romancing the prop. And men, you can do it too. In fact, it's a great excuse for a manicure.

The more natural you make your movements, the better you will look on camera, whether you're a presenter or an interviewee. Remember, the audience can see only what you show them, and what the camera can get. If you handle a prop the way you would if you were showing it to a person standing next to you, the viewer probably won't get a good look at it. So rehearse your blocking, know your marks, and don't fret when you hear 'back to one.'

There are currently no FAQs about On Camera: Develop Your Video Presence.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ .

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

* Estimated file size

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed On Camera: Develop Your Video Presence.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK

Upgrade to View Courses Offline

login

With our new Desktop App, Annual Premium Members can download courses for Internet-free viewing.

Upgrade Now

After upgrading, download Desktop App Here.

Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member ?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Learn more, save more. Upgrade today!

Get our Annual Premium Membership at our best savings yet.

Upgrade to our Annual Premium Membership today and get even more value from your lynda.com subscription:

“In a way, I feel like you are rooting for me. Like you are really invested in my experience, and want me to get as much out of these courses as possible this is the best place to start on your journey to learning new material.”— Nadine H.

Start your FREE 10-day trial

Begin learning software, business, and creative skills—anytime,
anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
lynda.com provides
Unlimited access to over 4,000 courses—more than 100,000 video tutorials
Expert-led instruction
On-the-go learning. Watch from your computer, tablet, or mobile device. Switch back and forth as you choose.
Start Your FREE Trial Now
 

A trusted source for knowledge.

 

We provide training to more than 4 million people, and our members tell us that lynda.com helps them stay ahead of software updates, pick up brand-new skills, switch careers, land promotions, and explore new hobbies. What can we help you do?

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.