Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Insights from a Project Manager

On a project vs. business as usual


From:

Insights from a Project Manager

with Bob McGannon

Video: On a project vs. business as usual

A project, by definition, has a distinct beginning, and an end. You create a product that does not exist. And when that product is created, you stop the project. It is a contained Piece of work. It's not ongoing. So let's take a real big, fun, wild example, okay? you create a new commercial airplane.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Insights from a Project Manager
1h 11m Appropriate for all Sep 23, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this Insights interview, Bob McGannon, PMP, will share the secrets he's cultivated in years of international project management for companies such as IBM and Boeing. Discover key skills for project managers, the ins and outs of certification options, and best ways to build and manage successful projects.

Topics include:
  • Advice for new project managers
  • Why choose PMP certification?
  • Tracking project hours
  • What is a triple-threat leader?
  • Agile vs. waterfall project management
  • Preventing scope creep
  • Learning to say no
Subjects:
Business Project Management Business Skills Career Development
Author:
Bob McGannon

On a project vs. business as usual

A project, by definition, has a distinct beginning, and an end. You create a product that does not exist. And when that product is created, you stop the project. It is a contained Piece of work. It's not ongoing. So let's take a real big, fun, wild example, okay? you create a new commercial airplane.

That is a massive project. But it starts with the idea of are we going to create a big commercial airplane? Are we going to create a fuel efficient airplane? Are we going to create a military aircraft? Wh, wh, whatever it is. And it ultimately ends up in the first product that you're going to You know, manufacture and sell, at some point in time, you go from that and just make 27 or 87 or 507 of them in a manufacturing line there after. The project is to create that product and the capability to build it, then the project ends.

Business as usual, this is a pretty big business as usual. But business as usual is then the ongoing manufacture of the product that you create. I might in a different example. I might create a set of tools, and scripts, and questions, and responses that people on a help desk ultimately have to manage. To support a product for the marketplace. That's a project, but once I'm done with that and the help desk is merrily getting requests, getting questions, answering questions, satisfying customers needs and going through that 800, 700, 22,000 times a day, whatever the case may be, that's ongoing business as usual.

So that's the primary difference. But I want to say, there's even nuances in that. Let's take a third example. Let's take, I am a construction company and I'm building out a whole new subdivision, so a new small neighborhood. I may have semi-custom homes. Alright I may be using five or six different designs, or eight or ten, whatever the case may be, to build these houses. I maybe be building the third instance of design six for this house now you may say well wait a minute this ain't the unique product we've built this house atleast three other times before or six other times before whatever the case may be.

And I say yeah I say, but this is on a different plot of land. The utility placement, relative to where the house sits, is probably different. The person that buys the house may have different ways they want to appoint it, they may have different cabinetry, they may want an additional bathroom. But whatever the case may be It's a unique product, even though it uses the same base design. It's a unique product, that's a project. You haven't asked this but the concept of a program is managing a bunch of projects in a coordinated way so that the building of this subdivision.

Would be a program. And that I'm probably going to want to hire the plumbers to work on multiple houses. I'm going to want to buy the timber not to build one house at a time but I'm going to get a volume discount by building a, by buying a lot of timber for all of the houses, et cetera. So that's the difference. Something is on an ongoing, repeatable basis. Where the project is something with a beginning and an end and the product in the end is unique.

There are currently no FAQs about Insights from a Project Manager.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Insights from a Project Manager.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked