New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Pitching Projects and Products to Executives
Illustration by Neil Webb

Dealing with naysayers


From:

Pitching Projects and Products to Executives

with Dane Howard and Richard Koci Hernandez

Video: Dealing with naysayers

(Music playing.) Dane Howard: There are many obstacles to getting an idea or project off the ground. Naysayers may feel like an obstacle--don't take the bait. Your emotional control and ability to bring them along will give you insight to build better arguments and plan to move the idea effectively forward. Rob Girling: Yeah, the bane of our lives are the people who--status quo is great.

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Pitching Projects and Products to Executives
44m 59s Appropriate for all Dec 16, 2010

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In Pitching Projects and Products to Executives, author Dane Howard interviews executives and product managers from renowned design firms and corporations like Google, Apple, and Adobe, who share their insider take on how to effectively move projects and product ideas forward. Video and multimedia producer Richard Koci Hernandez weaves the interviews together into a captivating visual narrative. The soft skills course shows the practical techniques, processes, and communication styles employed to sell to executives more effectively, and to bring ideas to life.

Topics include:
  • Getting and incorporating feedback before the pitch
  • Creating a list of key stakeholders
  • Deciding on the format of the meeting
  • Effective prototyping
  • Providing an intimate setting
  • Being succinct and staying on-track
  • Making the presentation
  • Closing the deal
Subjects:
Business Presentations Business Skills Leadership Management
Authors:
Dane Howard Richard Koci Hernandez

Dealing with naysayers

(Music playing.) Dane Howard: There are many obstacles to getting an idea or project off the ground. Naysayers may feel like an obstacle--don't take the bait. Your emotional control and ability to bring them along will give you insight to build better arguments and plan to move the idea effectively forward. Rob Girling: Yeah, the bane of our lives are the people who--status quo is great.

The naysayers are sort of the like very much the bait for me. So I have to really control myself sometimes, emotionally, to not take the bait. Ryan Tandy: More than anything, anybody who has an objection to your idea, you should listen to him. You should always hear to what they have to say because probably you are going to learn something. Diana Williams: A lot of times naysayers actually have a perspective and a point of view, and it's really important to understand what that perspective is, where are they coming from, trying to address to that need. A lot of times I try to get that feedback ahead of time, even before meeting with them, talking to their friends, their acquaintances, their colleagues, to understand what is the crust of the issue.

So then you can formulate your point of view and your perspective. Charles Warren: Ask questions, like "I am not sure I have the whole picture here, and I know you know about this--like, does this make sense?" Bring them into the design process. Ryan: It's weird because it can be political. It can be driven by marketing, by cost, performance; there are all these variables that may get in the way of a good design. So you may have to sacrifice for one of those many, many things.

This past year I have learned that over and over and over. There are so many times where I have something presented or something ready, and we go to look at it, talking about how it can it be built. "You can't build that." I said, "Really?" It's like, okay. You learn, over time, how to pick your battles. Albert Tan: The other thing also is just to confront people directly. If they say, "Oh, I don't like your idea," just kind of make a mental note of that and then rather than in a public situation sort of challenge them, take them out to lunch or meet them afterwards for dinner or for drinks or something.

You may find that they turn out to be your biggest ally. Diana: Now there are times where a naysayer doesn't change their mind. But if you have enough consensus with other team members, sometimes that naysayer will actually go, "You might agree to disagree," but still move forward anyway. Other times, they will just go along for the ride, and hopefully it will be the right decision. There have been probably several projects and a naysayer actually came up and said, "If we actually broaden it out or took a different perspective, we could actually hit a larger group and a larger audience." So just going back and then reinvestigating that, we actually expanded out the project, and it wasn't that they were trying to actually fully crush the initiative; they are just trying to say "take a different angle, so we can actually even get more return on that investment." Albert: There was a time when one of our executives had first purchased an iPhone and was very enamored by the packaging and how it was presented.

At the same time, we were also starting to think about, what is the impression that we want our product to have on consumers? For a long time, they didn't quite understand that importance because, as a company, we were very technology focused than engineering focused. So, at the moment though, he was not in his engineering moment; he was very much in a consumer moment. So, taking advantage of that time and going in while he was in that moment made him much more open.

Diana: Sometimes if you know people have very different opinions, you might actually choose to have two different meetings rather than bringing everyone into one. If it's going to be a highly controversial topic, sometimes if it's a very big project, I might have ten different meetings independently with individual people to kind of talk about their issues, kind of get them bought in on the idea, and the concept, make sure that I can lead them down kind of on a certain path, that I can enter their key questions before getting into the larger group.

Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about Pitching Projects and Products to Executives.


Expand all | Collapse all
please wait ...
Q: Where can I learn more about communication skills?
A: Discover more on this topic by visiting communication skills on lynda.com.
 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Pitching Projects and Products to Executives.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.