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Audition CS6 Essential Training
Illustration by John Hersey

Making selections


From:

Audition CS6 Essential Training

with Garrick Chow

Video: Making selections

In order to do the majority of the most common types of edits you'll be making in Audition, you'll first have to select a portion of the audio file that you want to edit. Much like in a word-processing application where you click and drag across the letters, words or paragraphs you want to edit, you make selections in Audition simply by clicking and dragging across the portion of the waveform you want to change. Now, I should say that this requires you to have the Time Selection tool selected, but as you can see, it's the only tool available when working in the Waveform Editor. If you have the Spectral Frequency Display open, or if you're working in a multitrack session, you'll have access to some of these other tools. When I'm just looking at the waveform, I have one default tool.
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  1. 1m 7s
    1. What is Audition?
      1m 7s
  2. 1m 55s
    1. Welcome
      54s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 1s
  3. 21m 6s
    1. Understanding the Audition interface
      8m 49s
    2. Setting up input and output
      4m 7s
    3. Setting essential preferences
      8m 10s
  4. 25m 3s
    1. Importing audio files
      6m 39s
    2. Extracting audio from a CD
      4m 6s
    3. Importing video files
      2m 21s
    4. Recording audio
      4m 50s
    5. Creating a multitrack session
      7m 7s
  5. 8m 8s
    1. Understanding frequency
      1m 50s
    2. Understanding amplitude
      1m 40s
    3. Understanding sample rate
      2m 34s
    4. Understanding bit depth
      2m 4s
  6. 37m 59s
    1. Understanding the Waveform Editor interface
      6m 2s
    2. Making selections
      6m 5s
    3. Adjusting the clip amplitude
      2m 49s
    4. Fading clips
      4m 5s
    5. Normalizing
      5m 17s
    6. Copying, cutting, and pasting
      7m 40s
    7. Undoing, redoing, and using the History panel
      4m 5s
    8. Generating silence
      1m 56s
  7. 24m 1s
    1. Using the Spectral Frequency Display
      2m 53s
    2. Using the selection tools
      7m 18s
    3. Using the Spot Healing Brush
      6m 34s
    4. Removing background noises
      7m 16s
  8. 46m 31s
    1. Understanding destructive vs. nondestructive effects
      12m 35s
    2. Applying compression
      9m 20s
    3. Understanding reverb vs. delay
      4m 44s
    4. Working with filters and EQ effects
      6m 46s
    5. Using special effects
      4m 26s
    6. Isolating vocals in a stereo track
      4m 27s
    7. Working with time and pitch effects
      4m 13s
  9. 1h 18m
    1. Creating a multitrack session
      6m 1s
    2. Recording and importing audio
      9m 42s
    3. Understanding the multitrack interface
      5m 20s
    4. Understanding the Mixer panel
      6m 13s
    5. Editing clips in Multitrack View
      9m 49s
    6. Grouping clips together
      2m 43s
    7. Creating bus groups
      7m 42s
    8. Routing and working with sends
      4m 7s
    9. Using automation
      12m 25s
    10. Pre-rendering tracks
      2m 19s
    11. Exporting the mix
      4m 13s
    12. Exporting the session
      3m 22s
    13. Burning the mix to a CD
      4m 45s
  10. 25m 17s
    1. Working with audio from video
      6m 23s
    2. Importing a sequence from Premiere Pro
      3m 59s
    3. Adding a soundtrack to a video
      3m 45s
    4. Exporting a session back to Premiere Pro
      3m 32s
    5. Using Automatic Speech Alignment
      7m 38s
  11. 9m 46s
    1. Understanding the interface
      6m 17s
    2. Using pan envelopes
      2m 44s
    3. Exporting a multichannel mix
      45s
  12. 52s
    1. Next steps
      52s

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Audition CS6 Essential Training
4h 40m Beginner May 06, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

Audition CS6 Essential Training demonstrates all of the major features of Adobe Audition and prepares sound editors to start enhancing and correcting audio—whether it's music, dialogue, or other sound effects. Author and musician Garrick Chow begins by covering how to import, record, and manage media files, from extracting audio and importing video, to creating a new multitrack session from scratch. The course then dives deep into editing, repairing, and cleaning up audio files, using the Waveform and Multitrack Editors, and the Spectral Frequency Display. It also covers how to use built-in effects, how to mix both stereo and surround audio tracks, and how to work with video projects from Premiere Pro.

Topics include:
  • Setting up the interface
  • Setting up inputs and outputs
  • Importing audio and video
  • Understanding audio terminology, such as frequency and amplitude
  • Adjusting clips in the Waveform Editor
  • Cleaning and repairing audio
  • Applying effects
  • Working with tracks in the Multitrack Editor and Mixer panel
  • Editing the soundtrack of video
  • Performing surround mixing
Subjects:
Audio + Music DAWs Mixing Video Audio for Video Music Editing Post Production
Software:
Audition
Author:
Garrick Chow

Making selections

In order to do the majority of the most common types of edits you'll be making in Audition, you'll first have to select a portion of the audio file that you want to edit. Much like in a word-processing application where you click and drag across the letters, words or paragraphs you want to edit, you make selections in Audition simply by clicking and dragging across the portion of the waveform you want to change. Now, I should say that this requires you to have the Time Selection tool selected, but as you can see, it's the only tool available when working in the Waveform Editor. If you have the Spectral Frequency Display open, or if you're working in a multitrack session, you'll have access to some of these other tools. When I'm just looking at the waveform, I have one default tool.

So you can drag in either direction, you can drag left to right or right to left. Notice in the Stereo file that both the right and left channels are selected simultaneously and identically. That's the default behavior you want in most cases, but if you ever want the edit to only affect one channel, first make your selection and then mute the channel you don't want to affect. For example, I've made my selection here, I'll mute the left channel, and then I'll press Delete on my keyboard. Notice I've only removed the audio in the selection on the right channel. The audio here in the left channel, it's still there. I'm just going to undo that.

To deselect anything you have selected, simply click anywhere in the waveform, whether it's in the selection or outside the selection. Another way to make a selection is to click to place the playhead where you want the selection to begin. Then hold Shift and click in the waveform where you want the selection to end. Everything in between those two points gets selected. I sometimes find it easier to do that than to click and drag the selection, especially if I'm zoomed in, and I need to make a long selection. For example, I'll just zoom in a bit here, and I'll click to place to playhead where I want my selection to begin, and then I'll use the navigator to scroll to the right, and then I'll Shift-click where I want the selection to end.

And you can do this front to back or back to front. It doesn't really matter in which direction you make your selection. Now, while I'm zoomed in here, I'll mention that another way to make a selection is to double-click in the Waveform Editor. That selects everything that's currently visible within the editor. Notice in the navigator that everything in here is selected. I can actually move this out of the way, and you can see that that area is the only area that was selected. Now, if you want to select the entire waveform, just triple-click. Now you can see the entire waveform is selected. Now, another way to make a selection is with Markers. Markers are used when you want to note a certain point in the recording that you may need to review or edit or just get back to it at some point.

You can add Markers by opening the Markers panel. If you don't see it, you can go to the Window menu and choose Markers from here. And here, you just click the Marker button each time you want to note a point on your waveform. So you can see that clicking it puts this marker or one marker here. I'll get this playhead out of the way, but it places it right where the playhead was. It also places this dotted line through the waveform so I can see precisely where it falls, and I can see the details here in the Marker panel. Now, you can also use a shortcut of pressing M on your keyboard to add another marker. I prefer this method because then it's very easy to add a marker as you're reviewing your audio.

Every time you hear something you want to check out later during playback, just press M. (male speaker: --tools. Then we're gonna put all those tools together to create a basic rig for your character. Then we're gonna get a little bit more advanced and--) So each time I press M, I add another marker there. You can also use your markers to make selections. For example, you might want to use markers to highlight an area you want to remove. Just select the marker in the Markers panel that represents the beginning or ending of the selection you want to make, then hold Shift and select the other marker.

That makes the Merge selected markers button available, and clicking it connects the two markers. Then just double-click the merged marker and everything within it will become selected. And to clear markers, you can select them and just click the Trash icon. Now, there's one last but very important thing that I want to show you about selections. Let's say I wanted to select a phrase in my recording in order to delete it or edit in some way. I'm just going to make a rough selection, something like that. Now, oftentimes, especially when you're deleting part of a waveform, you're going to end up hearing a click where the edit occurred. To see why this happens, I'm going to zoom way into the beginning of my selection.

Now, you can do this by clicking the Zoom In at In Point button down here, and that keeps the beginning of my selection centered in the Waveform Editor as I zoom in. Alternately, I can use my mouse's scroll wheel by keeping the mouse pointer directly over the area I want to zoom into. And I'm zooming way in here. Now, as I mentioned earlier, the center line here, this red line represents absolute silence. Generally, anytime you're making an edit, you want your selection to start and end where the waveform is crossing that red line rather than above it or below it.

And you can see that my selection right now is hitting this waveform where it's above the red line. It's better to do it where it's crossing the red line because that's the moment of silence. In making your edit there, it should eliminate any clicking or other unwanted sounds you may hear if you were to make your edit where the waveform is above or below the center line. Now, I could hold my Shift key to try to add or remove a bit of the selection and get it closer to the center line, but Audition can do this for you much more precisely. Now, the point at which the waveform crosses that center line is called the Zero Crossing.

Under the Edit menu, you'll find Zero Crossing, and the options here are fairly self-explanatory. You can either move both the start and the end points, adjust the entire selection inward or outward, or you can move just the start and end points either inward or outward. You might have to experiment with which one of these works best. But I'll select Adjust Selection Inward to move both ends of my selection to the nearest Zero Crossing, and that will very slightly shorten my selection. But as you can see now, the selection is right on that intersection point. Even if I zoom way in, you can see it's right there where it crosses the center point.

So that's really how all your selections should be made. Now, for the sake of brevity, you won't see me doing this every time I make a selection here in these tutorials, but when you're working on your own work and when it's important, you want to make sure that you understand the center crossing concept and use it. And that's why it's important to learn the keyboard shortcuts for setting the zero point. I'm going to zoom all the way back out here. So when you know the keyboard shortcuts, you can make your selection. In this case, I'll hit Shift+I to automatically set both my start and end points to the Zero Crossing. Now, it's imperceptible at this level of zoom, but Audition has made the change. So remember, that's found under Edit > Zero Crossings, and again, try to learn the keyboard commands here.

Okay, so just bear that in mind as you make your selections in Audition.

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