Seasonal Savings: 20% off selected memberships for a limited time. Give now

Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Recovering in Aperture

From: Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

Video: Recovering in Aperture

I am going to talk a little bit about preserving your work when you are using Aperture digital asset manager. Now there's two aspects to this; one is setting it up so that you save your work, and then the other, of course, is if disaster happens to your computer, how to restore based on your backups. So Aperture uses something called the Vault, and let's take a look at it down here. There is our Vault. Now you get to it right here. This is -- this little icon down here, turns it off and on. You notice that we have a little red circle there.

Recovering in Aperture

I am going to talk a little bit about preserving your work when you are using Aperture digital asset manager. Now there's two aspects to this; one is setting it up so that you save your work, and then the other, of course, is if disaster happens to your computer, how to restore based on your backups. So Aperture uses something called the Vault, and let's take a look at it down here. There is our Vault. Now you get to it right here. This is -- this little icon down here, turns it off and on. You notice that we have a little red circle there.

Well, that is because I have added some photos since the last time I ran the Vault; I have added these hot air balloon images. Now if everything is up to date, this little circle will be black. And if you've just changed some metadata, let's say, added some keywords, since the last back up to the Vault, it will be yellow. Red means that there are masters and metadata both. And the way that you update the Vault is that you simply click on this arrow here, it will ask me about updating, I say yes, and it goes to work.

Now the arrow is black. So what just happened there? Well, we have a referenced library set up here in Aperture. There are two types; referenced and managed. I'll talk about managed in just a minute. Aperture backed up my work, and if you watched the Lightroom version of this movie, it works very much the same way. The work is backed up, but the masters are separate. Let's take a look at where the masters are. The masters are located on an external hard drive, and if I open this up right here, you'll see that the masters are right here in Balloon Festival.

So I am responsible for backing those up myself. What Aperture did was when I ran the Vault, which is right here on another hard drive -- so this is one hard drive where the Vault lives, and here is another hard drive where my masters live. The reason why I have my masters on this particular drive, this is that Western Digital drive that actually has two hard drives in it. So when I copy my masters to this drive, it actually mirrors them on to the second drive, and that helps protect me from mechanical failure.

All right, so at any rate, here's my work in the Vault, and here are my masters. So every time I run the Vault in Aperture, it backs up my work. Making sure that my masters are safe and sound; that is my responsibility. And that is why I have them on an external drive, and that's why I have them on a drive that backs itself up, because the whole idea here is, of course, that if your Macintosh crashes, then you want to make sure that you can restore your work.

Now restoration is actually quite easy; let me show you how that works. I am going to switch to a brand new clean library. Go up here to File>New, switch to what I call Aperture Library Fresh. Doesn't that sound pleasant? So here we are; fresh library. So let's play out the scenario. Let's say that your Mac totally crashed, or a piano fell on it and you had to buy a new Mac. You reinstall Aperture, and you are here with a blank Aperture, but you want your work back; you want all the work that you did, and you have been backing up your images, and you have been running the Vault. How do you get your stuff back? Just go down here to the Gear menu, go to Restore Library; you have to pick the Vault.

So the hard drive that has the Vault on it needs to be connected to your computer. Here's our Aperture 3 Vault right here, and then also the hard drive that has the masters on it has to be connected too. Because what the Vault is going to do is it is going to restore all that information, and then it's going to look for those masters to point to. So you have to have the drives connected that have all of your information. We do. So I am going to put Select here. Now I am just going to click Restore.

I always love this: Are you sure you want to restore your library? Yes, I am positive. And we just wait, well, not too long. Keep in mind that this is a smaller library. If you have a really humongous library, you'll click Restore, and then you go have lunch. And there we go. Our entire library is back. Here are the new images, and you'll notice, not only did it restore the library, not only did it bring back my images, and my metadata, but it is in the same state that I left it.

This is the way I left the Hot Air Balloons: with the rating sorted, and the three stars on the top, and all that stuff. So it brings it back very nicely. Now, there is another option in Aperture. This option here is restoring from a reference library; that means your masters live outside the Aperture container. There is another option called the managed library, and that is where your work and your masters live inside this container.

It is very convenient in the sense that you don't have to worry about backing these up separately anymore. They are all in the Vault. Now, the reason why I am not going to show it to you right now, how to set that up, is because there are a number of steps that actually began at import. The import movie that I showed you in this training is for referenced, because we are talking about organizing your library, kind of by hand, really. But if you want to know the steps involved for setting up the managed library, we have all of that for you, waiting for you, by me, in Aperture 3 Essential Training.

It's not difficult at all once you see the steps; it does take a few minutes, and even if you started your library one way: referenced, and you want to have it managed, you can switch. The people that I think managed libraries work great for; they don't accumulate a whole lot of RAW files. People that are shooting JPEGs, managed works fantastic. If you are shooting a ton of RAW files, that's going to fill up a hard drive quickly, and you need to separate your RAW files over many hard drives, then this approach that we've been talking about I think works well, because Aperture can read those masters from all those different hard drives.

So something to keep in mind; you have two approaches in Aperture. In Lightroom, you basically have one approach: the referenced approach. Pick the one that works best for you, but the main thing is to back up, and to be consistent, and to protect both your pictures and your work.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos
Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos

49 video lessons · 15536 viewers

Derrick Story
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 37s
    1. Welcome
      1m 5s
    2. Why photo organization matters
      1m 32s
  2. 3m 21s
    1. Using media readers
      59s
    2. Using hard drives for storage and backup
      2m 22s
  3. 12m 26s
    1. Making sure your camera is set up correctly
      3m 22s
    2. Understanding how your camera stores photos and movies
      3m 29s
    3. Removing pictures from your card
      1m 33s
    4. Taking advantage of dual card slots on DSLRs
      31s
    5. Taking care of your memory cards
      1m 18s
    6. Creating a set of folders on your hard drive
      2m 13s
  4. 11m 39s
    1. Dealing with your legacy collection
      2m 11s
    2. Transferring photos to a Windows computer
      2m 35s
    3. Transferring photos to a Mac
      2m 22s
    4. Doing a software-assisted photo transfer
      4m 31s
  5. 8m 27s
    1. Viewing photos on a Windows computer
      2m 21s
    2. Viewing photos on a Mac
      2m 53s
    3. Viewing photos using file browsers
      3m 13s
  6. 15m 42s
    1. Understanding digital asset managers
      2m 39s
    2. Transferring images with Lightroom on a Windows computer
      5m 56s
    3. Transferring images with Aperture on a Mac
      5m 11s
    4. Transferring photos with iPhoto
      1m 56s
  7. 15m 46s
    1. Understanding keywords
      3m 49s
    2. Setting strategies for using keywords
      4m 17s
    3. Lightroom keyword tips
      2m 42s
    4. Aperture keyword tips
      4m 58s
  8. 16m 51s
    1. Assigning ratings to photos
      4m 39s
    2. Flagging your favorites
      3m 58s
    3. Organizing in Lightroom
      1m 50s
    4. Using filters in Aperture
      2m 49s
    5. Organizing in iPhoto
      3m 35s
  9. 9m 52s
    1. Understanding albums and collections
      2m 27s
    2. Creating Smart Albums in Aperture
      2m 41s
    3. Working with collections in Lightroom
      2m 45s
    4. Setting up albums in iPhoto
      1m 59s
  10. 13m 32s
    1. Managing photos that you edit in Photoshop
      5m 24s
    2. Managing derivative versions in Lightroom
      4m 17s
    3. Managing derivative versions in Aperture
      3m 51s
  11. 16m 13s
    1. Choosing file formats
      4m 39s
    2. Backing up to hard drives
      3m 31s
    3. Deciding photos to archive
      1m 34s
    4. Backing up to your local area network
      2m 3s
    5. Backing up to the cloud
      2m 49s
    6. Working with multiple hard drives
      1m 37s
  12. 19m 40s
    1. Recovering in Lightroom
      5m 20s
    2. Recovering in Aperture
      6m 52s
    3. Recovering in iPhoto
      2m 46s
    4. Recovering from a file-system-managed backup
      1m 28s
    5. Making prints of your best work
      3m 14s
  13. 1m 54s
    1. Next steps
      1m 54s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ .

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Organizing and Archiving Digital Photos.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member ?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferences from the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Learn more, save more. Upgrade today!

Get our Annual Premium Membership at our best savings yet.

Upgrade to our Annual Premium Membership today and get even more value from your lynda.com subscription:

“In a way, I feel like you are rooting for me. Like you are really invested in my experience, and want me to get as much out of these courses as possible this is the best place to start on your journey to learning new material.”— Nadine H.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.