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Vanishing Point Exchange in Photoshop Extended

From: After Effects Apprentice 11: 3D Space

Video: Vanishing Point Exchange in Photoshop Extended

There are several ways to use Adobe Photoshop to create 3D objects that can then be imported into After Effects. The first one we're going to explore is called Vanishing Point Exchange. It's a way of turning a flat photograph into literally a 3D house of cards. Go to File>Open, navigate to inside your Exercise Files for CS5.5, open up the Sources folder, open up the 3D folder, then select building*starter.jpg.

Vanishing Point Exchange in Photoshop Extended

There are several ways to use Adobe Photoshop to create 3D objects that can then be imported into After Effects. The first one we're going to explore is called Vanishing Point Exchange. It's a way of turning a flat photograph into literally a 3D house of cards. Go to File>Open, navigate to inside your Exercise Files for CS5.5, open up the Sources folder, open up the 3D folder, then select building*starter.jpg.

This sort of image is a good candidate for Vanishing Point Exchange. Vanishing Point Exchange relies on you having a number of flat surfaces that connect at nice clean angles, that it can then convert into a series of flat surfaces that are folded together to create a three-dimensional outline of this building. Once you've selected your image, go to Filter>Vanishing Point and you'll open up the special Vanishing Point dialog. Make sure you have the Create Plane tool selected; it's the default, zoom in on your image; you can hold Command on Mac or Ctrl on Windows and press the plus key.

Then use the spacebar to pan around and look for a good cleanly represented first rectangle to use to define as your starting point. Now, these walls are nice clean rectangles, but unfortunately, I cannot see the ends of these walls because this photo was cut off. However, I do get to see all of this nice rectangular window. So I'm going to use that as my starting point and build out from here. With my Create Plane tool selected, I need to first click and select four corners of this rectangle.

Be very careful how you place these, because this is going to be the starting point for the rest of the entire image. Now, I'm carefully placing these points, clicking, then releasing at the four corners of the window, and Photoshop is going to use that information to decide what angle this window is at. If you click at some place that's clearly not a rectangle, like here, Photoshop will turn the outline red, indicating it doesn't really think that's a rectangle, and you should try again. So I'll undo and start again. I'll click once up in this corner, and again, don't be afraid to zoom in even more to see things with higher precision.

You will get an opportunity to change things a little bit after the fact, but get as close as you can on this first guess. You can see I'm being very careful, looking at my blue lines to make sure they go down the middle of my antialiased edge in that window and lining things up the best I can. I'll click, and then Photoshop will create a blue grid for me. Blue means it's happy; red means it's not. Now that I have my first rectangle, I need to expand that out to cover this entire wall. All you need to do is hover your cursor over one of these floor handles along the sides of your rectangle and then just drag.

Photoshop will keep the perspective until you get to the edge of your wall. Now, you notice I'm a little bit off here. That's okay. I'm going to get a chance to fix that. Let's go ahead and drag it up here, define the top edge of that wall, right around there. Again, if necessary, hold down the spacebar and drag to move your display around. I'm going to go off the bottom here, and you'll notice that it won't let you drag all the way off the bottom of the image. I'm going to hold Command or Ctrl, press minus to zoom down, and drag this plane down below the edge of my image.

And finally, I'm going to drag it out to this left side of that wall. So I've completely covered this flat rectangular wall. Now let's go ahead and clean up the perspective on this first rectangle. I'll Command+Plus or Ctrl+Plus to zoom back in, click on this point, Photoshop will let me drag it into that corner to make it right. I can see that it's falling a little bit off the edge of the building along here, so I'll click and drag to get it close. There is a slight difference between the straight lines that Photoshop draws and the real metal edge of this building.

That's probably an indication that there might be a little bit of lens distortion with this photo. If you're doing this for a client, you do want to spend some time taking a few trial passes, seeing if it works; if necessary, doing some processing in Photoshop, so just removing lens distortion to get nice clean lines. But in this lesson, I just want to give you an idea of the workflow, so we're going to forgive little errors like this. Press spacebar, drag down to the bottom, Command+Minus or Ctrl+Minus to zoom down, and grab this point down here and position it.

The other thing I'm going to be looking at is how these blue lines line up with these metal tiles and other details in this image. Go ahead and try to create as accurate of a first rectangle as I can. I'm falling pretty close in there, but I think if I drag down a little bit, I'll get a little bit better perspective. I'm going to zoom in and look. I think I'm doing pretty well. Yup, we're going to use this as our starting point.

After you've created your first plane, you will now start to drag out sides of that plane to cover your other sides of the building and define other rectangles. I'm going to zoom down a little bit, hover the cursor over this nubbin again, and this time I'm going to hold down Command on Mac or Ctrl on Windows, and that tells Photoshop change tools and define a new plane. So rather than extending the current plane, it starts drawing a new plane for me.

I'll make sure that whole wall is covered. Again, there's a little bit of distortion here, so I'm going to grab this point and drag it until things seem to line up. You notice that both walls are moving at this point. So I'm going to click in my other surface to make sure things still look pretty good for it. Now, that's a very good line actually, so I'm happy with this. Now that I've got these two walls defined, I can start defining these overhangs. Now, how far you go here depends how ambitious you are. If you are feeling a bit lazy, if you're a bit pressed for time, you could just hold Command or Ctrl, drag out to here, and just say, oh, that's the entire roof overhang.

In reality, this roof is in a couple of pieces. It comes out flat here, then goes upwards again here. So I'm going to go an extra mile here and define all of these edges. But you can be forgiven for just saying, let's just treat this as a flat roof for now and just go out to this point. I'm going to back up to this edging, right around this white area here. You'll notice that I'm not getting the entire overhang, because it extended the rectangle out from the dimensions of this rectangle underneath. That's okay. I can go ahead and grab an edge, I'm not holding any modifier key, and drag it out to get that edge.

Again, I might zoom in here, use the hand and drag and make sure I'm holding pretty close to these edges. There we go. There is a little bit of lens distortion, but again, we're going to forgive ourselves since this is just a test. Later on we'll talk about how to clean these up later anyway. Okay. Now, if I want to get this upward edges overhang, again, Command or Ctrl, drag straight up to make sure I've got it all covered. I'm going to zoom down to look at this from another perspective. And I see that I do have a choice here of what not to extend up and capture to the sky or to crop off part of the building.

Zoom back in here, pan around. I think I'm going to go ahead and capture as much of this as metal as I can for now. I will end up capturing some of the sky accidentally as well. Again, this is a problem with lens distortion; I'm not exactly getting this building right. But I can paint or clone that edge later on and we'll talk about how to do that. Okay. Now that I have that, I'll select this surface, Command or Ctrl and drag it upward as well, and make sure it joins nicely right up here with my other edge.

I'll zoom in again, get as close as I can, because if I don't do this right, my model pieces in After Effects won't line up either. All right. One overhang left. Select it, Command or Ctrl to start a new surface going off at a perpendicular angle, zoom in to get a better idea of what I'm doing. I'll need to make sure it joins up with the other line, which it does, and then finally, Command or Ctrl and drag upward to finish that overhang.

And again, I will repeat, you can be forgiven if you just simplify this roofline. I'm just doing this to show you what is possible and to get you thinking about steps for when you're doing a real photo for yourself. Obviously, this building has some interesting details, like these beams, that make it hard to exactly represent with nice flat planes. It's an imperfect process. You're going to have to make some compromises and make some decisions. Anyway, there's our building with all of our various planes defined for Photoshop to build into a 3D model.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for After Effects Apprentice 11: 3D Space
After Effects Apprentice 11: 3D Space

54 video lessons · 13974 viewers

Chris Meyer and Trish Meyer
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 4m 47s
    1. Welcome
      2m 47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      2m 0s
  2. 15m 12s
    1. Comparing 2D and 3D
      5m 30s
    2. Rotation in 3D
      4m 47s
    3. Keyframing in 3D
      4m 55s
  3. 15m 9s
    1. Multi-planing workaround in 2D
      3m 21s
    2. Using 3D views
      6m 45s
    3. Natural multi-planing in 3D
      5m 3s
  4. 13m 9s
    1. Keyframing a fly-in
      5m 24s
    2. Editing 3D motion paths
      5m 43s
    3. Auto-orienting a layer along its path
      2m 2s
  5. 1h 4m
    1. Adding a camera to a composition
      9m 0s
    2. Comparing camera presets
      2m 48s
    3. Using the camera tools with the active camera
      4m 48s
    4. Using the camera tools in the alternate views
      4m 50s
    5. 3D view options
      1m 58s
    6. Animating a 3D camera
      6m 20s
    7. Creating an orbit camera rig
      5m 42s
    8. Extending your camera rig
      4m 31s
    9. Auto-orientation with 3D cameras
      7m 33s
    10. Depth of field blur in CS5.5 and later
      5m 47s
    11. Controlling the focal plane in CS5.5 and later
      5m 12s
    12. Iris properties in CS5.5 and later
      6m 16s
  6. 29m 15s
    1. Creating a 3D light
      6m 35s
    2. Working with Point lights
      3m 20s
    3. Working with Spot lights
      3m 48s
    4. Creating shadows
      10m 13s
    5. The Light Falloff feature in After Effects CS5.5 and later
      5m 19s
  7. 48m 6s
    1. Enabling ray-traced 3D in CS6
      3m 26s
    2. Extrusions in CS6
      3m 39s
    3. Bevels in CS6
      5m 39s
    4. Bending layers in CS6
      5m 35s
    5. Transparency in CS6
      4m 20s
    6. Refraction in CS6
      4m 6s
    7. Targeting Surfaces in CS6
      3m 23s
    8. Reflections in CS6
      7m 35s
    9. Environment layers in CS6
      5m 40s
    10. Quality vs. speed in CS6
      4m 43s
  8. 11m 33s
    1. Quizzler challenge for CS6
      1m 42s
    2. Quizzler solution for CS6
      9m 51s
  9. 41m 6s
    1. Vanishing Point Exchange in Photoshop Extended
      9m 18s
    2. Vanishing Point Exchange in After Effects
      4m 38s
    3. Importing a 3D model into Photoshop Extended in CS5.5 and earlier
      9m 7s
    4. Creating 3D objects using Repoussé in CS5.5 and earlier
      9m 46s
    5. Live Photoshop 3D inside After Effects in CS5.5 and earlier
      8m 17s
  10. 20m 58s
    1. Introduction to dimensional stills
      3m 41s
    2. Cutting up the source image
      2m 25s
    3. Repairing the layers in Photoshop
      8m 26s
    4. Animating the resulting layers in After Effects
      6m 26s
  11. 25m 27s
    1. Rotation vs. orientation
      3m 15s
    2. Understanding the axis modes
      4m 4s
    3. Scaling issues in 3D
      4m 57s
    4. OpenGL acceleration in CS5 and earlier
      6m 23s
    5. Fast previews in CS6 and later
      6m 48s

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